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 Collection: Virtual Music Rare Book Room
Atys : tragedie mise en musique
Atys, which premiered on 10 January 1676, is the first of the tragédies lyriques of Jean-Baptiste Lully and Philippe Quinault to have a tragic ending. As the Prologue indicates, the tragedie itself is a divertissement to ease the king's mind of his impending duties. Joyce Newman, in Jean-Baptiste de Lully and his Tragédie Lyriques, summarizes the message of the story in this way: "In [Atys], Quinault shows how actions which are not in accord with the noble ideal will bring defeat and punishment. Not only is love in opposition to glory in this opera, but also it is shown that if love is place more highly than honor, it will bring unhappiness even to one of the immortals." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57/
Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Volume 3
This is a copy of the third volume of "Dictionary of Music and Musicians," edited by Sir George Grove. This volume, published in 1883, is an encyclopedic work that contains the biographies of well-known composers as well as articles contributed by various authors on music topics, concepts and definitions starting alphabetically from: "P" (Planché, James Robinson) to "S" (the title of the Medieval rota, "Sume is icumen in"). The names of contributing authors appear in a list on pp.[v]-vii, signed "29 Bedford Street, Covent Garden, July, 1883." The titles of volumes I and II, indicate that the dictionary was issued in three volumes. However, the titles of the third and fourth volumes changed that statement to indicate that the publication of the dictionary was in four volumes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31506/
Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Volume 4
This is a copy of the fourth volume of "Dictionary of Music and Musicians," edited by Sir George Grove. This volume, published in 1890, is an encyclopedic work that contains the biographies of well-known composers as well as articles contributed by various authors on music topics, concepts and definitions starting alphabetically from: "S" (continuation of the article about the Medieval rota, "Sume is icumen in" that appears on vol. 3) to "Z" (starting with the singer, Zur Mühlen, Raimund von). The names of contributing authors appear in a list on pp.[vi]-xi. The titles of volumes I and II, indicate that the dictionary was issued in three volumes. However, the titles of the third and fourth volumes changed that statement to indicate that the publication of the dictionary was in four volumes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31507/
Storia della musica
This is a copy of the second of three volumes of "Storia della musica" (Music History) by Giovanni Batista Martini. Each volume bears a different dedicatee: v.1: alla Sacra reale cattolica Maestà Maria Barbara; v.2: All'Altezza serenissima elettorale di Carlo Teodoro; v.3: a sua Altezza reale Don Ferdinando di Borbone. The t.p. of this volume is printed in red and black ink and decorated with a border that depicts various musical instruments. It also features an illustration of a minotaur and a young boy (presumably, the god Apollo) holding a lyre. This volume is divided in nine chapters and three dissertations. The start of each chapter and each dissertation features, within an ornamented oval-shaped frame, the notated music of a canon in a five-line staff with underlaid text taken from works by Hesiod, Homer, Anacreon, and Sophocles. The book contains maps of Greece and Asia Minor, as well as a table that summarizes the divisions of the breve and prolations translated to 18th century musical notation practice. Chapter 1 discusses the origins of music according to precepts passed down from antiquity and Greece as well as the theory of musical intervals. Chapter 2 discusses several Greek mythological figures and a history of the invention of the lyre per Homer. It also mentions Greek authors and use of instruments in Greek festivities. Chapter 3 presents stories of Greek gods and demigods by Ovid and Homer, among others. Chapter 4 includes Virgil's story of Orpheus (the son of Apollo) and his attempted rescue of his dead wife Eurydice from Hades. The chapter contains references to the role of music in that story. Chapter 5 is about the role of music in the cult of Cybele (in Greek mythology, the mother of all gods). It also mentions names of people mentioned by Plutarch in connection with several musical instruments--e.g., the flute by Janus. The chapter includes a musical staff that explains the Greek chromatic, enharmonic, and diatonic genres. Chapter 6 continues the stories of Greek mythological and heroic characters mentioned in the previous chapters and their involvement with music. Chapter 7 discusses Greek poets (e.g., Homer, Hesiod and Plato) and includes some of their verses alluding music. Chapter 8 discusses the function of music in Greek sacrifices, festivities, weddings and funerals. Chapter 9 discusses the function of music in the celebration of games and competitions. The first dissertation, argues about the influence of Greek music and discusses theoretical concepts such as Pythagoras tuning and the theory of music proportions taken from treatises such as "Armonia" by Quintilian. The second dissertation argues about the unique properties of Greek music and treatment of music according to rules of rhetoric. It contains a table of rhythmical division of notes, and discusses the principles of singing syllables properly. The third and last dissertation argues about the wonderful effects produced in humans by Greek music and the "Theory of Affects." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31511/
Thetis et Pelée; tragédie en musique
Pascal Collasse was one of the few opera composers able to secure successful performances in the years following Lully’s death. Collasse then went on to supply the music for the entire opera, Thétis et Pélée, which was premiered at the Paris Opéra on 11 January 1689. Thétis remained popular throughout Collasse’s lifetime, in spite of its rather weak plot. Owing to its success is primarily the music, including a significant storm scene in Act II. This departure from the Lullian tradition is perhaps Collasse’s most significant contribution to the tradition of French opera. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4/
Atys : tragédie lyrique en trois actes
The story of Atys was first known operatically through Lully’s opera that premiered in 1676 at the court of St Germain-en-Laye. Marmontel adapted Quinault’s libretto and modified it by removing the prologue and divertissements. He also altered the plot; in lieu of Ovid’s metamorphic ending (to which Quinault had adhered), Atys commits suicide. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31/
Recueil d'opera
Collection of opera excerpts in manuscript (in an unidentified hand). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1690/
Iphigenie en Aulide; tragédie. Opera en trois actes
Although he did not have a production planned, Gluck composed the music for Iphigénie en Aulide for Paris, with the intention (along with Roullet) of establishing himself at the Opéra. He initially had difficulties convincing the Academy of Music to arrange for the production, but with the support of Marie Antoinette, the opera was finally realized in 1773. Gluck revised Iphigénie for performances in 1775. The most significant change was the addition of Diana as a character, whose appearance serves as the deus ex machina of the plot. He also altered and expanded the divertissements. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc15/
Colonie : opéra comique en deux actes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc41/
Barbe bleue : comédie en prose et en trois actes
Although the story of Bluebeard was familiar to French readers from Charles Perrault’s 1698 collection of children’s tales, transferring it to the operatic stage was problematic due in large part to the gruesome nature of the plot. Other violent works had appeared in Paris, but in this instance, the drama was to be performed at the Comédie-Italienne, which typically featured lighter plots than that of Raoul and Isaure. Nevertheless, the opera had a successful run, receiving over a hundred performances in the decade after its premiere. After its initial popularity, Raoul Bluebeard was staged less frequently, but it still made an impression on nineteenth-century composers, particularly Weber. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc17/
Echo et Narcisse, drame lyrique en trois actes
After the resounding success of Iphigénie en Tauride (1779), Gluck set out to compose his last of the seven Paris operas, which turned out to be his final opera. Whereas Iphigénie en Tauride is often considered Gluck’s best opera, its immediate successor, Echo et Narcisse (1779) was ill-fated and quickly disappeared from the repertoire. Echo was premiered a mere four months after Tauride, and the Parisian audience was not prepared for the differences between these two operas. Although the music resembles that of his other French operas, the pastoral story lacks the dramatic intensity that viewers expected in a Gluck opera. Thus, the serene music—though it is at times quite beautiful— lacks dramatic impulse. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13/
Le trompeur trompe, ou, La rencontre imprevue. Opera-comique en un acte. Represente pour la premiere fois sur le Theatre de la Foire S. Germain, le 18 fevrier 1754.
In the mid-eighteenth century, comic opera librettos served a dual purpose, as evinced by the libretto to Vadé ’s Trompeur trompé (1754). Although the primary function of the publication was to allow audience members to follow along with the text of the opera, solo airs were printed in the back of the book. Not all the melodies are included, but those printed in the libretto enhance our understanding of an opera the music of which was never published as a comprehensive musical score. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc81/
Orphée et Euridice; tragédie; opéra en trois actes
The Viennese premiere of Orfeo was extremely well received, and Gluck decided to revise the opera as Orphée et Eurydice for Paris in 1774, with the French adaptation and additions provided by Pierre Louis Moline. The role of Orpheus was lowered slightly for an haute-contre singer (a male operatic voice type more in line with an alto range), adhering to French preferences. The opera was lengthened, to create a more magnificent spectacle, with extra arias, ensembles, and instrumental numbers. Gluck also modified the orchestration to accommodate the orchestra at the Académie Royale de Musique. This version, Orphée et Eurydice, became one of the most popular operas in France. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc16/
Pigmalion
This is the 1773 edition of the libretto to the comic opera and vaudeville, "Pigmalion" by Charles-François Panard and Thomas Laffichard. The opera premiered at the Paris Opéra Comique in 1735 . The plot is an adaptation of Ovid's story of Pygmalion, a sculptor who fell in love with a statue that he carved. Operatic and ballet representation of the subject of Pigmalion (or Pygmalion) became famous after Antoine Houdar de la Motte's entrée "La sculpture" for the ballet "Le triomphe des arts," which staged in 1700 at Académie Royale de Musique with music by Michel de la Barre. Page 16 of this edition was incorrectly numbered as number 10. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31513/
Tractatus de musica
The present volume is a 1875 compendium of various Latin music treatises by Johannes Tinctoris gathered from manuscript sources from Brussels, Bologna and Gand. The present edition, edited by Charles Coussemaker, comprises ten of the twelve surviving manuscripts of Tinctoris's theoretical works. According to Oxford Music, these were written in the first few years of his employment at Ferrante's court and demonstrate Tinctoris's intellectual and pedagogical mastery of music theory. They also demonstrate his acquaintance with contemporaneous composers of the early Renaissance Burgundian composers like Antoine Busnoys, as well as with the music of Franco-Flemish composers such as Johannes Ockeghem. Below is a table of content listing the titles of each treatise and a brief description of the concepts they treat. Treatises and Description: "Expositio manus" - this treatise is divided in 10 chapters consisting of: definitions, places, clefs, voicing, properties, deductions, mutations, conjunctions, conclusion; "Liber de natura et proprietate tonorum" - this treatise is divided in 51 chapters containing: definitions and name of tones, concerning the species diatessaron and diapente, formation of first throughout the eighth tone, authentic and plagal modes, ascending and descending perfect/imperfect tones; "Tractatius de notis et pausi" - this treatise is divided in two books. Book one contains a prologue and 14 chapters devoted to definitions of note values (e.g., long, breve, semi-breve, minim) and the use of ligatures. Book 2 explains the notation of note rests; "Tractatus de regulari valore notarum" - this treatise is this treatise includes a prologue and 32 chapters devoted to explanations of the musical notation of tempi and modes and the use of prolation (i.e., symbols used to indicate perfect and imperfect subdivisions of the breve; "Liber imperfectionum musicalium notarum" - this treatise is divided in two Books and a prologue. These are concerned with the notation of perfection and imperfection in major mode; "Tractatus alterationum" - note alterations; "De punctis musicalibus" - this treatise is divided in three books. The first book contains 19 chapters concerned with the use of the point to alter note values and tempi. Book two, divided in 34 chapters, discusses the use of semitones, tritone, tuning considerations, and counterpoint rules. The third book, divided in 9 chapters, discusses counterpoint rules; "Proportionale musices" - this treatise is divided in three books. The first book, divided in 9 chapters, defines and discusses the rules of music proportions. The second book, in 6 chapters, discusses major and minor relations. The third book, divided in 8 chapters, discusses the qualities of various prolations; "Diffinitorium Musices" - this treatise contains a prologue and 20 chapters all of which define musical terms; "Complexus effectuum musices" - this part contains two treatises found in two sources: the manuscript codex of Brussels (9 chapters) and the codex of Gand (20 sections). Both codices are devoted to the physical, emotional and spiritual effects of music. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31512/
Colinette à la cour ou La double épreuve : comédie lyrique en trois actes
A comparison of the scores for Colinette à la cour and Barbe-bleue illustrates the primary distinguishing factor between the genres of comédie lyrique and opera comique: the method of dialogue delivery. In Paris, the issue of genre was tied to the performance venue of a particular opera, due to government regulations. Although comic opera was traditionally presented with spoken dialogue, as in opera comique, when Grétry composed for the Opéra, where recitative was expected, he merged comic subject matter with the sung dialogue heard in serious opera. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc18/
Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Volume 2
This is a copy of the second volume of "Dictionary of Music and Musicians," edited by Sir George Grove. This volume, published in 1880, is an encyclopedic work that contains the biographies of well-known composers as well as articles contributed by various authors on music topics, concepts and definitions starting alphabetically from: "I" (improperia) to "P" (plain song). The names of contributing authors appear in a list on pp.[v]-vii, signed "Bedford Street, Covent Garden, October 1, 1880." The titles of volumes I and II, indicate that the dictionary was issued in three volumes. However, the titles of the third and fourth volumes changed that statement to indicate that the publication of the dictionary was in four volumes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31505/
Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Volume 1
This is a copy of the first volume of "Dictionary of Music and Musicians," edited by Sir George Grove. This volume, published in 1879, is an encyclopedic work that contains the biographies of well-known composers as well as articles contributed by various authors on music topics, concepts and definitions starting alphabetically from: "A" (i.e., the sixth note in the scale of C major) to "I" (impromptu). The names of contributing authors appear in a list on pp.[vii]-viii), signed "Bedford Street, Covent Garden, April 1, 1879." The titles of volumes I and II, indicate that the dictionary was issued in three volumes. However, the titles of the third and fourth volumes changed that statement to indicate that the publication of the dictionary was in four volumes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31504/
Storia della musica
This is a copy of the first of three volumes of "Storia della musica" (Music History) by Giovanni Batista Martini. Each volume bears a different dedicatee: v.1: alla Sacra reale cattolica Maestà Maria Barbara; v.2: All'Altezza serenissima elettorale di Carlo Teodoro; v.3: a sua Altezza reale Don Ferdinando di Borbone. The t.p. of this volume is printed in red and black ink and decorated with a border that depicts various musical instruments and includes a pastoral scene depicting Euterpe, the muse of music, holding a lyre and a horn as allegory of a scepter, and accompanied by various putti singing or playing musical instruments. Each page of the book is decorated with an ornamented border. The volume is divided in eleven chapters and three dissertations. The start of each chapter and each dissertation features, within an ornamented oval-shaped frame, the notated music of a canon in a five-line staff with underlaid text taken from passages in the book of Psalms and other books of the Old Testament. This volume includes an engraved portrait of Martini by an unknown engraver and one illustration by Nicolaus Valleta depicting Queen Maria Barbara of Portugal in the company of several mythology figures, such as Apollo and Minerva, among others. At the center top appears a crown and a banner with the Latin inscription, "Hoc offer Regina, Tibi Lectum undique manus. Et vult esse tuum Musica quid quid Habet." At the bottom appears the coat of arms of the Spanish crown. The first chapter explains the purpose of the volume and defines three classifications of music as defined by Boethius in the medieval ages: mundana (produced by the motion of planets and celestial bodies), humana (loosely translated as music of the body and soul), and instrumentalis (this kind produced by the human voice and musical instruments). Chapters 2-11 are devoted to some aspect of music covering various biblical ages starting with the story of the creation, as told in the Book of Genesis, throughout the lives of the Jewish patriarchs (Moses, David, and Solomon), and the encounter of the Hebrews with other eastern peoples. The first dissertations argues about human natural singing and discusses theoretical concepts such as Greek music theory, scales and division of tetrachords. The second dissertation argues about the ancient manner of singing in harmony as taught by Zarlino and other music theoreticians. This part discussed the evolution of music notation from heightened neumes to the invention of four-line staff and square notation, to the five-line staff and Renaissance music notation. The third dissertation discusses the influence of Hebrew vocal and instrumental church music. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31509/
Forza del sangue, e della pietà; drama per musica
1686 libretto for Giuseppe Fabrini's opera La forza del sangue, e della pietà. The music for all of Giuseppe Fabrini’s operas, including La forza del sangue e della pietà, is lost. However, the libretti by Gerolamo Gigli, have been preserved for these dramas that were performed at the Collegio Tolomei in Siena. La forza del sangue e della pietà translates as “The Force of Blood and Pity.” digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9/
Omphale, tragedie en musique
Omphale (1701) is one of Destouches’s contributions to the Lullian genre of the five-act tragédie en musique. Half a century after the premiere, Friedrich Melchior Grimm targeted the opera in his pamphlet “Lettre sur Omphale” (1752), which continued the earlier debate between advocates of Lully and Rameau. This written attack also precipitated the famous guerre des bouffons, which was sparked by a performance of Pergolesi’s La serva padrona (1733) in 1752. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc6/
Songs in the new opera call'd Arsinoe, queen of Cyprus
Thomas Clayton’s first opera, Arsinoe, Queen of Cyprus, premiered at Drury Lane in London on 16 January 1705. The opera initially enjoyed success, but two years later, Clayton’s second opera was not well-received. Part of Arsinoe’s popularity may have been due to Catherine Tofts' portrayal of the title character; Toft would later become a star of the English stage. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3/
Épreuve villageoise : opéra bouffon en deux actes en vers
L’épreuve villageoise started out as Théodore et Paulin before Grétry convinced Desforges to rewrite the libretto. The original three-act opera was reduced to two acts, and the improbabilities of the original plot were reworked. Théodore et Paulin received one performance at Versailles on 5 March 1784, but it was never published. L’épreuve villageoise appeared at the Comédie-Italienne on 24 June 1784. This revision remained one of the most popular of Grétry’s opéra-comiques, receiving performances throughout the nineteenth century. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc19/
La fede ne' tradimenti
This is a 1689 copy of Girolamo Gigli's three-act libretto for the opera "La Fede ne' tradimenti," set to music by Giuseppe Fabbrini for the 1689 Carnival season at the Collegio Tolomei in Siena, Italy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25954/
Nouvelles parodies bachiques, mélées de vaudevilles ou ronde de table
This a copy of vol. 2 of an anthology of French songs compiled by Christophe Ballad, music publisher of King Louis XIV. The work consists mainly of unaccompanied melodies with underlaid text for selected acts of the following tragedies: Proserpine (pp. 1-19); Le triomphe de l'amour (pp. 20-60); Persée (pp. 61-81); Phaeton (pp. 62-94); Amadis (pp. 95-125); Roland (pp. 126-155); Armide (pp. 169-176); Acis et Galatée (pp. 177-192). It contains also melodies for "Ballet du temple de la Paix" (pp. 156-168), and Vaudevilles on rondes de table (pp. 193-264). Two previous editions, compiled by Monsieur Ribon, published under title: Parodies bachiques. Cf. RISM, v. B I, 1 1695(4) and 1696(1), present ed. listed as 1700(3). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25959/
Le istitutioni harmoniche
This is a 1562 copy of "Le istitutioni harmoniche," one of the most influential music theory treatises written by Gioseffo Zarlino. The first edition appeared in Venice in 1558. The treatise, divided in four parts, includes theoretical and practical elements of music. The first two parts discuss philosophical, cosmological and mathematical aspects of music, Greek tonal system and tuning. The third and fourth parts cover the rules of counterpoint and modes, respectively. This copy bears a dedication to Vicenzo Diedo. It contains a table of contents per chapter and list of corrections. Several handwritten annotations appear on the t.p. ink: "coll: cochi nuoi soc: Jesù;" "exdono Joannis Jerary;" and "Inscriptet catalog." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25955/
Orfeo ed Euridice
This is the libretto of "Orfeo ed Euridice" by Ranieri de Calzabigi, published in vol 2 of "Raccolta di melodrammi serj scritti nel secolo XVIII." The original volume contains works by Apostolo Zeno, Giuseppe Parini, Marco Coltellini, Castone Rezzonico della Torre, Ranieri de Calsabigi, and F. Saverio de Rogati. On the back of the t.p. appears a quote in Virgil's "Georg.," iv, 465: "Te dulcis conjux, te solo in littore mecum, te veniente die, te discedente canebam." The libretto includes a prologue and list of characters. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25951/
Love in a Village: a Comic Opera As it is Performed at the Theatre Royal in Covent-Garden. For the Harpsicord, Voice, German Flute, or Violin.
Vocal score for Love in a Village is broken into four labeled sections ('books'), each of which has a separate title page, and includes the music from the comic opera which has figured bass. Some of the music includes underlaid lyrics and the names of the persons who performed the pieces. Table of contents for the entire work is on page [1]. According to Grove Music Online, the opera is the story of a heroine (Rosetta) who runs away from an unhappy marriage. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25957/
Amour au village : opera-comique, en un acte, et en vaudeviles
Libretto for Charles-Simon Favart's 1754 opera L'amour au village. Charles-Simon Favart gained prominence for his parodies of extant operas during the middle of the eighteenth century. His L’amour au village (1754), a typical example of the genre, was based on Carolet’s L’amour paysan (1737). The parody technique consisted of setting new texts to existing melodies and writing new dialogue based on a familiar plot. L’amour au village includes a typical vaudeville finale. In the Virtual Rare Book Room’s volume, the melody is included along with the first verse’s text. Because vaudeville finales are strophic (with one repeated melody), the subsequent verses are numbered to indicate each time the melody should begin again. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc10/
Armide: Drame héroique, mis en musique
Armide was premiered at the Paris Opéra on September 23, 1777, recalling the earlier success of Lully’s opera of the same name, which premiered nearly a century earlier on February 15, 1686. After collaborating on several reform operas with Calzabigi, Gluck revived the older dramatic tradition of Quinault (Lully's librettist) by setting the older text in the modern musical style. The seventeenth-century five act model requires more continuous music, with few distinct arias, as well as divertissements and spectacular effects. Gluck also respects the tragic conclusion endemic to the model, avoiding the modern practice of the lieto fine ("happy ending") in which misfortunes are reversed at the last possible moment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56/
Don Juan, oder, Der Steinerne Gast : komische Oper in zwey Aufzügen, volume 2
By the time of Mozart and Da Ponte’s collaboration on Don Giovanni, the Don Juan legend had been represented in musical entertainments and on the popular stage a number of times. Although it was an unusual topic for Viennese court opera, the retelling of the Don Juan story was immensely appealing for the Italian troupe in Prague. Don Giovanni did eventually make its way to Vienna, but the opera did not meet the same success it had received in Prague. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc85/
Richard Cœur de Lion : opéra comique en trois actes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc22/
Platée : comédie-ballet
Jacques Autreau’s play Platée, ou Junon jalouse was based on a story by a second-century Greek author named Pausanias who chronicled his travels (including rituals and traditions) in ten books that represent the different regions of Greece. At the time Le Valois d’Orville appropriated Autreau’s drama for a libretto, it was uncommon for French court operas to include comic features, and even Autreau’s spoken play lacked the comic tone of the opera. Yet, the humor extends beyond the plot; for instance, the sounds of frogs and birds are represented instrumentally. Platée was first performed at Versailles for the wedding of the dauphin and Princess Maria Theresa of Spain in 1745. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc38/
Bellérophon; tragedie mise en musique
Although not the first of the Jean-Baptiste Lully's tragédies lyriques, Bellérophon was the first of Lully's opera scores to appear in print. The Ballard first edition was printed in 1679 to accompany the premiere, on January 31 of that year, at the Palais Royale. Bellérophon was the second of two operas (the first was Psyché) created by Lully without librettist Philippe Quinault after the scandal associated with Isis that led to Quinault's temporary dismissal as royal librettist. After an extended illness during which he did not compose, Lully collaborated with Thomas Corneille and Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle for the second time to create one of his most unqualified successes. Following the first performance in January 1679, Bellérophon played for nine months at the Palais Royale. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58/
Oeuvres de M. Vade, ou recueil des opera-comiques, & parodies qu'il a donnes depuis quelques annees; avec les airs, rondes, & vaudevilles notes; & autres ouvrages du meme auteur.
Jean-Joseph Vadé’s popularity as a composer and librettist is evident in the publication of his collected works, which first appeared in 1755 but was expanded in 1758, a year after his death. Vadé’s œuvre consists of mostly opéras comiques, some with original music rather than preexisting tunes. The collected works editions include fictional correspondence and poetry. Vadé’s interest in capturing the bustling atmosphere of fish markets is evident in such works as Les quatre bouquets poissards and the poem La pipe cassée, which is classified as a “poëme epitragipoissardiheroicomique.” Melodies for operatic airs are also printed in this volume. Although Vadé claimed authorship of the music, some were familiar tunes that had existed before Vadé appropriated them. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc80/
Fileuse : parodie d'Omphale
When Vadé’s first opera comique, La fileuse, appeared at the Foire St Germain on 8 March 1752, the tragic opera that it parodied—Destouches’s Omphale (1701)—had recently been criticized by Friedrich Melchior Grimm in his “Lettre sur Omphale.” Soon after this attack on “bad taste” in French music, the Querelle des Bouffons heated up, with debates about the merits of Italian comic opera versus French serious opera. Many mid-eighteenth-century French comic parodies were based on familiar serious operas, but following the Querelle des Bouffons, lyrical Italianate melodies were incorporated into the opera comique genre. Vadé’s La fileuse follows the older model of reworking existing tunes to new texts, including a vaudeville finale; later in his career, he composed some original airs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc79/
Devil to pay: or, The wives metamorphos'd
English libretto to Charles Coffey's ballad opera The devil to pay or, The wives metamorphos'd. The Devil to Pay is an adaptation of Thomas Jevon’s play The Devil of a Wife (1686). Nearly fifty years later, the ballad opera appeared at Drury Lane with Charles Coffey and John Mottley each responsible for half of the three acts. However, a much shorter and more well-received one-act version, edited by Theophilus Cibber, is represented in the printed libretto. Today Coffey is generally the only name widely attached to The Devil to Pay. The opera’s popularity is attested by the frequent performances and a translation into German, which contributed to the development of the Singspiel. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2/
Armide: drame héroïque
Armide was premiered at the Paris Opéra on September 23, 1777, recalling the earlier success of Lully’s opera of the same name, which premiered nearly a century earlier on February 15, 1686. After collaborating on several reform operas with Calzabigi, Gluck revived the older dramatic tradition of Quinault (Lully's librettist) by setting the older text in the modern musical style. The seventeenth-century five act model requires more continuous music, with few distinct arias, as well as divertissements and spectacular effects. Gluck also respects the tragic conclusion endemic to the model, avoiding the modern practice of the lieto fine ("happy ending") in which misfortunes are reversed at the last possible moment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67/
Beggar's opera
This is a 1735 fourth ed. of the three-act ballad opera "The beggar's opera" by John Christopher Pepusch and John Gay. It includes the score for the overture (for violins (2), viola, and bass ensemble) and the melodies of each song. The inscription, "Nos haec novimus esse nihil" (transl. as, We know these to be nothing) that appears on the t.p. is an epigram by Marcus Valerius Martialis from his Books of Epigrams. On the back of the t.p. appears the advertisement of these works printed by John Watts: Fifty one new fables in verse; The tunes to the songs in the Beggar's Opera, transposed for the flute; and Gay's opera "Achilles." A table of songs shows the first lines of text for each act. The item includes a list of characters. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25946/
Storia della musica
This is a copy of the third of three volumes of "Storia della musica" (Music History) by Giovanni Batista Martini. The t.p. of this volume is printed in red and black ink and each page is decorated with an ornamented border. It contains numerous figures, musical examples demonstrating theoretical concepts of Greek music, and footnotes. Each one of the volume bears a different dedicatee: V.1: alla Sacra reale cattolica Maestà Maria Barbara; v.2: All'Altezza serenissima elettorale di Carlo Teodoro; v.3: a sua Altezza reale Don Ferdinando di Borbone. The present vol. 3 is divided as follows: ch.1 - Greek music (pp. 1-24); ch.2 - Poetics, music and drama (pp. 25-90); ch.3 Dramatic poetry (pp. 91-148); ch.4 - Medieval and new dramatic poetry (pp.149-169); ch.5 - Music in Greek tragedy and drama (pp. 170-197); ch. 6 - Illustrious Greek music teachers (pp.198-268); ch.7 Greek philosophers on music (pp.269-369); ch.8 - Greek music theory practice (pp.370-440); Dissertation on the prodigious effect produced by antique Greek music (pp.[419]-440); Index of people mentioned in the volume (pp.441-445); Index of authors with short biography, in alphabetical order (pp445-458); Errata (p. 459). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25966/
Prattica di musica, utile et necessaria si al compositore per comporre i canti suoi regolatamente, si anco al cantore per assicurarsi in tutte le cose cantabili
This book is the first part of Lodovico Zacconi's "Prattica di musica," published in 1596. The contents of this book are divided in four parts covering: the history of music, definition of musical terms, introduction to musical notation, modes, time and prolation, rules of counterpoint, musica ficta, classification of musical instruments, and proper manner of singing polyphonic works and musical ornaments. A second part, "Prattica di musica seconda parte," was published in Venice in 1622. The library's copy contains the following pagination errors: leaves 30, 67, 124, 130, 134, 188 were numbered incorrectly as 29, 140, 130, 122, 130, 194, respectively. There are two leaves numbered 50, each containing the parts for the alto, bass and tenor with underlaid text "Beatus author seculi" and "Residuo." Each leaf is preceded by another leaf that contains the singing parts for the cantus, quintus and tenor. These are two versions of a polyphonic setting, in duple time and triple mensuration, respectively. In the second example, the words Gloria tibi domine" appear under the cantus and quintus. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25960/
Rutzvanscad, il giovine
This is a copy of Cattuffio Panchianio's "Rutzvanscad, il Giovine," a parody of Greek tragedy. The library's copy is bound with the libretto of Giovanni Battista Casti's "Prima la musica e poi le parole." Clarification notes relating to terms and characters of the tragedy appear on the back of p.79 together with a list of printing errors. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc25965/
Tom Jones; comedie lyrique en trois actes
Philidor’s Tom Jones is representative of the continental interest in English literature. Henry Fielding’s homonymous novel served as the foundation for Philidor’s opera, but Philidor pared down the story quite a bit, especially downplaying Tom’s philandering ways. Many secondary characters and situations were also cut, a common technique that librettists employ when adapting prose writings to the stage. Thus, a central plot unfolds in a manner that the audience can follow, and the length remains manageable for an evening’s entertainment. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc36/
Messa à 4
This a manuscript copy of two Mass movements, Kyrie and Gloria, gathered from a "Messa à 4." The copyist, Vincenso Marchetti, attributed this mass to the composer Matteo Bisso. The texts of both movements of the Mass are divided in several sections and set musically for an ensemble of mixed choir (S.A.T.B), vocal soloists, strings and basso continuo. Each section reflects changes of tonality, tempo, and musical meter. The composer indicated dynamics, the use of muted strings (e.g., p.[84]) and performance indications such as unison and col parte (e.g., p. [76] and p.[79]). The last section for the Chirie [sic] is set musically as a slow fugue in triple meter. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc86519/
Issé
1724 score of André Cardinal Destouches' opera Issé. Destouches’s Issé premiered in 1697, just nine years after the death of Jean-Baptiste Lully. The tradition of featuring new operas at the court prior to a public premiere—common during Lully’s later years—was reinstated with this work. When Destouches revived the opera in 1708, he enlarged the original three-act work to five acts. This allowed for expanded divertissements, choruses, and more elaborate arias, which appealed to contemporary public preferences. The volume in the Virtual Rare Book Room is the five-act version. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5/
Plain and easy introduction to practical music
In 1597, while Morley was negotiating for the patent, he wrote his musical treatise, A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke. Although his preface contains the statement that he had “nothing better to do,” Morley probably knew publishing a treatise on the science of music would boost public interest in purchasing musical works. In addition, by publishing such a work, the English audience would view Morley as an authority in music (and he would become more likely to obtain the patent) (Smith, “Print Culture and the Elizabethan Composer,” 163). The work is practical, and is organized into three sections: teaching to sing simple song, teaching to sing two parts over a plainsong or ground, and teaching counterpoint. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc86/
Tancrède: tragédie
André Campra’s Tancrède, which premiered on 7 November 1702, is his best-known tragédie en musique, with a run of performances until 1764, and high praise by noteworthy music personalities such as Rameau. While the music critic La Cerf de la Viéville wrote positive comments about Tancrède, he was bothered by the opera’s use of low voices, which defied the tradition of employing castrati parts. Additionally, the role of Clorinda was written for a well-known contralto named Mademoiselle Maupin; although the range is that of a mezzo-soprano, the powerful quality of Maupin’s voice seemed to be a prime consideration for Campra. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc23/
Armide
Armide, which premiered at the Paris Opéra February 15, 1686, was the last tragédie lyrique on which Jean-Baptiste Lully collaborated with his favorite librettist, Philippe Quinault. Quinault retired from the stage after Armide, and Lully died a year later on March 22, 1687. From its first performance, Armide was considered their masterpiece. Armide is unusual among Lully and Quinault's tragédies lyriques in that it concentrates on the psychological development of a single character; the reflective style of this late work may be regarded as an early presentiment of trends toward individualism in art. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53/
Don Juan, oder, Der Steinerne Gast : komische Oper in zwey Aufzügen, volume 1
By the time of Mozart and Da Ponte’s collaboration on Don Giovanni, the Don Juan legend had been represented in musical entertainments and on the popular stage a number of times. Although it was an unusual topic for Viennese court opera, the retelling of the Don Juan story was immensely appealing for the Italian troupe in Prague. Don Giovanni did eventually make its way to Vienna, but the opera did not meet the same success it had received in Prague. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84/
Finta pazza, drama.
Although Sacrati’s La finta pazza (1641) was immensely popular and influential, the opera has received little discussion in modern scholarship, due in large part to the absence of the music (even the number of extant copies of librettos is very small). Since Lorenzo Bianconi discovery of a score that was used for traveling productions, the opera has received increasing attention. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc44/
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