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  Partner: UNT Music Library
 Collection: Virtual Music Rare Book Room
Devil to pay: or, The wives metamorphos'd

Devil to pay: or, The wives metamorphos'd

Date: 1732
Creator: Coffey, Charles, d. 1745
Description: English libretto to Charles Coffey's ballad opera The devil to pay or, The wives metamorphos'd. The Devil to Pay is an adaptation of Thomas Jevon’s play The Devil of a Wife (1686). Nearly fifty years later, the ballad opera appeared at Drury Lane with Charles Coffey and John Mottley each responsible for half of the three acts. However, a much shorter and more well-received one-act version, edited by Theophilus Cibber, is represented in the printed libretto. Today Coffey is generally the only name widely attached to The Devil to Pay. The opera’s popularity is attested by the frequent performances and a translation into German, which contributed to the development of the Singspiel.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Achille et Polixene, tragédie dont le prologue & les quatre derniers actes

Achille et Polixene, tragédie dont le prologue & les quatre derniers actes

Date: 1687
Creator: Collasse, Pascal, 1649-1709
Description: Achille et Polixene, Jean-Baptiste Lully's last opera, premiered on 7 November 1687, eight months after Lully's death on March 22 of that year. Since the composer had only finished the overture and first act, the score was completed by Pascal Colasse, Lully's secretary and student, to a text by Jean Galbert de Campistron based on events in Virgil's Aeneid.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Thetis et Pelée; tragédie en musique

Thetis et Pelée; tragédie en musique

Date: 1716
Creator: Collasse, Pascal, 1649-1709
Description: Pascal Collasse was one of the few opera composers able to secure successful performances in the years following Lully’s death. Collasse then went on to supply the music for the entire opera, Thétis et Pélée, which was premiered at the Paris Opéra on 11 January 1689. Thétis remained popular throughout Collasse’s lifetime, in spite of its rather weak plot. Owing to its success is primarily the music, including a significant storm scene in Act II. This departure from the Lullian tradition is perhaps Collasse’s most significant contribution to the tradition of French opera.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Elements of Musical Composition; comprehending the Rules of Thorough Bass, and the Theory of Tuning.

Elements of Musical Composition; comprehending the Rules of Thorough Bass, and the Theory of Tuning.

Date: 1812
Creator: Crotch, William, 1775-1847.
Description: Manual describing musical composition for beginners. The manual is divided in 9 chapters and includes 479 musical examples engraved in 59 pages at the end of the book, as well as four plates with figures (plate no. II appears at the beginning of the book. The musical examples cover the following subjects: scales, intervals (diatonic and chromatic) and their inversion, counterpoint rules, harmonic progressions, use of non-harmonic tones (suspensions, passing notes, appoggiaturas, and upper-lower neighbor. It also includes several examples taken from Handel's "Dettingen Te Deum," "Messiah," and from Haydn's oratorio "Creation," among others.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
1er quatuor, pour deux violons, alto et basse, oeuvre 5

1er quatuor, pour deux violons, alto et basse, oeuvre 5

Date: [182?]
Creator: Dancla, Charles, 1817-1907.
Description: This is a digital copy of the four parts of Charles Dancla's first string quartet, op.5 in F minor. Charles Dancla was the most prominent member of a family of musicians and a virtuoso violinist, composer and teacher. In 1828, he was admitted to the Paris Conservatory of Music, where he won the first prize in 1833. At the Conservatory, he studied violin with Paul Guérin and Pierre Baillot. Dancla played solo violin with the orchestra of the théâtre Royal de l'Opera Comique and with the Société des Concerts. In ca. 1860, he was appointed professor of violin at the Paris Conservatory and retired from that post in 1892. He wrote 14 string quartets intended for professional or amateur players (opp. 5, 7 ,18, 41, 48, 56, 80, 87, 101, 113, 125, 142, 160, and 195a) and three easy string quartets (op. 208). The library's copy includes a list of subscribers that names amateur and distinguished musicians such as: the composers [Hector] Berlioz, [Luigi] Cherubini, [Giacomo Meyerbeer], the violinist [Jean-Delphin] Alard, and pianist [Pierre] Zimmermann, among others.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
7e. quatuor, pour deux violons, alto et violoncelle, oeuv.80

7e. quatuor, pour deux violons, alto et violoncelle, oeuv.80

Date: [186?]
Creator: Dancla, Charles, 1817-1907.
Description: This is a digital copy of the four parts of Charles Dancla's seventh string quartet, op.80 in D minor. Charles Dancla was the most prominent member of a family of musicians and a virtuoso violinist, composer and teacher. In 1828, he was admitted to the Paris Conservatory of Music, where he won the first prize in 1833. At the Conservatory, he studied violin with Paul Guérin and Pierre Baillot. Dancla played solo violin with the orchestra of the théâtre Royal de l'Opera Comique and with the Société des Concerts. In ca. 1860, he was appointed professor of violin at the Paris Conservatory and retired from that post in 1892. He wrote 14 string quartets intended for professional or amateur players (opp. 5, 7 ,18, 41, 48, 56, 80, 87, 101, 113, 125, 142, 160, and 195a) and three easy string quartets (op. 208).
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune

Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune

Date: 1895
Creator: Debussy, Claude, 1862-1918
Description: This is the orchestral score of Debussy's Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune. The copy was presented to Edouard Colonne with the inscription by the composer on the title page, "à Monsieur E. Colonne en hommage d'infinie gratitude artistique, Claude Debussy, Oct. 1895." The score contains performance markings in pen, pencil and crayon; possibly by Colonne. In original green wrapper. Preserved in green cloth-and-marbled-paper chemise with matching slipcase.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Momie

Momie

Date: [1778?]
Creator: Despréaux, Jean Étienne, 1748-1820.
Description: This is a ca. 1778 libretto for the burlesque opera in three acts "Momie" by a Jean Étiennethat Despréaux. The opera is a parody based on Leblanc du Roullet's libretto of "Iphigénie en Aulide," an opera by Christoph Willibald Gluck. The libretto includes the titles of the tunes at the opening of each scene. Page 6 of the library's copy is incorrectly numbered as page 9.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Issé

Issé

Date: 1697
Creator: Destouches, M. (André Cardinal), 1672-1749
Description: 1724 score of André Cardinal Destouches' opera Issé. Destouches’s Issé premiered in 1697, just nine years after the death of Jean-Baptiste Lully. The tradition of featuring new operas at the court prior to a public premiere—common during Lully’s later years—was reinstated with this work. When Destouches revived the opera in 1708, he enlarged the original three-act work to five acts. This allowed for expanded divertissements, choruses, and more elaborate arias, which appealed to contemporary public preferences. The volume in the Virtual Rare Book Room is the five-act version.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library
Omphale, tragedie en musique

Omphale, tragedie en musique

Date: 1701
Creator: Destouches, M. (André Cardinal), 1672-1749
Description: Omphale (1701) is one of Destouches’s contributions to the Lullian genre of the five-act tragédie en musique. Half a century after the premiere, Friedrich Melchior Grimm targeted the opera in his pamphlet “Lettre sur Omphale” (1752), which continued the earlier debate between advocates of Lully and Rameau. This written attack also precipitated the famous guerre des bouffons, which was sparked by a performance of Pergolesi’s La serva padrona (1733) in 1752.
Contributing Partner: UNT Music Library