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  Access Rights: Public
 Department: Anthropology
 Collection: UNT Scholarly Works
Toward an Understanding of Contemporary Professional Culture

Toward an Understanding of Contemporary Professional Culture

Date: April 14, 2011
Creator: Giulietti, Michael & Jordan, Ann
Description: This presentation discusses research on understanding contemporary professional culture. In the summer of 2010, the author embarked on an applied anthropology project to study the American professional culture of shoe repair. The project was funded by UNT's McNair Program, with guidance by Dr. Ann Jordan of UNT's Anthropology department. This qualitative study utilized anthropological methods to investigate this rapidly diminishing group and the reasons for its precipitous decline. The project had two methods of participant recruitment: in-store encounters, and attendance at the Shoe Service Institute of America's 2010 convention in Oklahoma City. Twenty-one participants were gathered from shoe repair establishments in the Dallas-Fort Worth are and an additional twenty-eight participants were located at the convention. The research uncovered the adaptive strategies employed by the shoe repair industry to remain a viable business in a consumption-driven market economy. In a future guaranteed to have fewer resources, shoe repair may see a resurgence as the public begins to value the services of shoe repair experts once more.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
True Tolerance: Religion in a Global Society - A Work in Progress

True Tolerance: Religion in a Global Society - A Work in Progress

Date: April 2, 2009
Creator: Ferguson, Sarah & Wilkerson, Dale
Description: This presentation discusses research on religion in a global society. The authors investigate the movement of major religions towards secularization, the validity of a universal religious ideology, and the benefits of the aforementioned in creating understanding and supporting peaceful interaction between civilizations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
What Color Line? Discrimination and Ethnic Identity

What Color Line? Discrimination and Ethnic Identity

Date: March 30, 2006
Creator: Jones, Andrew & Nuñez-Janes, Mariela
Description: This presentation discusses research on discrimination and ethnic identity. The most important conclusion of this research is that people who do not experience a sense of feeling different based on their ethnicity are likely to accept a color-blind perspective of society. The paper briefly explores the political implications for people who support this model.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
What Color Line? Discrimination and Ethnic Identity

What Color Line? Discrimination and Ethnic Identity

Date: March 30, 2006
Creator: Jones, Andrew & Nuñez-Janes, Mariela
Description: This paper was written based on an interview with a Hispanic professor. The informant was interviewed about his life, schooling, experiences as a professor, and specifically about being a Hispanic professional in higher education. These experiences are discussed, as well as the question of how discrimination affected the professor's preference for an ethnic label. The most important conclusion of this research is that people who do not experience a sense of feeling different based on their ethnicity are likely to accept a color-blind perspective of society. The paper briefly explores the political implications for people who support this model.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Women and Wasta: The Connection Between Tribal Affiliation and Women's Opportunities for Success

Women and Wasta: The Connection Between Tribal Affiliation and Women's Opportunities for Success

Date: April 3, 2008
Creator: McCarty, Rebecca & Davenport, Beverly
Description: This presentation discusses research on the connection between tribal affiliation and women's opportunities for success. Women in Oman are achieving various leadership positions in government and business. However, the numbers of women in leadership positions are still markedly low compared to those of men. How are certain women achieving those positions, and how can others join their ranks? Is tribal affiliation a factor?
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
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