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 Decade: 2010-2019
 Collection: General Collection
Guidance Documents for Lifecycle Management of ETDs
In 2011, a research team led by the University of North Texas, the Educopia Institute/MetaArchive Cooperative, and the worldwide Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD), began studying the production, dissemination, and preservation of Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs). The original intent was to develop and disseminate documentation for academic libraries that would help curators better understand and address the preservation challenges presented by these new digital collections. As researchers from the libraries of University of North Texas, Virginia Tech, Rice University, Boston College, Indiana State University, Penn State, and the University of Arizona began to grapple with ETD lifecycle management issues, they quickly realized that librarians were but one of many academic stakeholder groups that work collaboratively to produce and maintain ETD collections. Studying the library role in isolation was neither feasible nor helpful. The scope of our work increased to encompass the roles and responsibilities of core stakeholders in the ETD lifecycle: students, faculty, administrators, technologists, commercial vendors, and librarians. The resulting Guidance Documents address areas of interest to ETD program planners, managers, and curators. They will help this extended set of stakeholders understand, document, and address the administrative, legal, and technical challenges presented by ETDs—from submission to long-term preservation. The authors have aimed to be comprehensive in their treatment of ETD programs, and encourage readers to review all of the Guidance Document to gain a holistic view. However, they have also highlighted the sections of each document relevant to 4 roles in ETD programs: institutional administrators, submission staff, access and repository staff, and IT staff. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc282598/
Guidelines for Digital Newspaper Preservation Readiness
The Guidelines for Digital Newspaper Preservation Readiness address a specific set of preservation challenges faced by libraries, archives, historical societies, and other organizations that curate substantial collections of digital newspaper content. The Guidelines are intended to inform curators and collection managers at libraries, archives, historical societies, and other such memory organizations about various practical readiness activities that they can take. They provide links to technical resources that curators can either implement themselves or work with their technical staff to implement. The Guidelines (Version 1.0) only deal with digital newspapers at this point, not broadcast or other forms of digital news. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc282586/
A Guide to the Best Revenue Models and Funding Sources for your Digital Resources
With the support of the Jisc-led Strategic Content Alliance (SCA), Ithaka S+R has developed this guide to support those who are actively managing digital projects and are seeking to develop funding models that will permit them to continue investing in their projects, for the benefit of their users, over time. This report updates Sustainability and Revenue Models for Online Academic Resources (2008) in two major ways: first, by expanding the list of revenue models covered in order to take into account emerging models, including highlighting those methods that are compatible with open access. Second, the report places the notion of ‘revenue generation’ in the context of the fuller range of funding activities we have observed in higher education and the cultural sector. In addition to practices more often seen in the commercial world like advertising and corporate sponsorships, the report devotes time to discussions of a range of philanthropic sources of support as well as support offered by host institutions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc282585/
Does Every Research Library Need a Digital Humanities Center?
The essay discusses specific concerns of digital humanists in hopes of bridging the gap between how library directors and digital humanities researchers think. It suggests many ways to respond to the needs of digital humanists, and creating a Digital Humanities center is appropriate in relatively few circumstances. The essay recommends that a “Digital Humanities-friendly” environment may be more effective than a Digital Humanities Center but that library culture may need to evolve in order for librarians to be seen as effective Digital Humanities partners. The authors conclude that what we call “The Digital Humanities” today will soon be considered “The Humanities.” Supporting Digital Humanities scholarship is not much different than supporting digital scholarship in any discipline. Increasingly, digital scholarship is simply scholarship. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc272207/
Participatory Design in Academic Libraries: New Reports and Findings
This report looks at how staff at eight academic institutions gained new insight about how students and faculty use their libraries, and how the staff are using these findings to improve library technologies, space, and services. Participatory design is a relatively recent approach to understanding library user behavior. It is based on techniques used in anthropological and ethnographic observation. The report is based on a series of presentations at the second CLIR Seminar on Participatory Design of Academic Libraries, held at the University of Rochester’s River Campus June 5-7, 2013. Chapters focus on projects at the University of Colorado, Boulder; Colby College; University of Connecticut; Columbia University; Rush University Medical Center; Purdue University; Northwestern University; and the University of Rochester. David Lindahl, of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, provided the keynote. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc282584/
The Internet's Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz
he Internet's Own Boy depicts the life of American computer programmer, writer, political organizer and Internet activist Aaron Swartz. It features interviews with his family and friends as well as the internet luminaries who worked with him. The film tells his story up to his eventual suicide after a legal battle, and explores the questions of access to information and civil liberties that drove his work. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc305466/
Research Data Management Principles, Practices, and Prospects
This report examines how research institutions are responding to data management requirements of the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and other federal agencies. It also considers what role, if any, academic libraries and the library and information science profession should have in supporting researchers’ data management needs. University of North Texas (UNT) Library Director Martin Halbert opens the report with an overview of the DataRes Project, a two-year investigation of data management practices conducted at UNT with colleagues Spencer D. C. Keralis, Shannon Stark, and William E. Moen. His introduction is followed by a series of papers that were presented at the DataRes Symposium that UNT organized in December 2012. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc234929/
Searching for Sustainability: Strategies from Eight Digitized Special Collections
This report aims to address one of the biggest challenges facing libraries and cultural heritage organizations: how to move their special collections into the 21st century through digitization while developing successful strategies to make sure those collections remain accessible and relevant over time. Through a cooperative agreement as part of the National Leadership Grants Program, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) funded the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), in partnership with Ithaka S+R, to undertake in-depth case studies of institutions that have worked to build the audience, infrastructure, and funding models necessary to maintain and grow their digital collections. The eight collections profiled provide useful models and examples of good practice for project leaders to consider when digitizing their own materials. We hope that these case studies will encourage greater discussion among individuals in the academic library and cultural heritage communities about the reasons why they invest so much time and energy in the creation and ongoing management of their digitized special collections, the goals they set for them, and the planning needed to realize those aims. These questions become even more pressing in an environment where the traditional sources of funding for digitization are beginning to wane. In the coming years, the ability to identify secure sources of support and to demonstrate impact over time will undoubtedly become increasingly important. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc234918/
Born Digital: Guidance for Donors, Dealers, and Archival Repositories
The report provides recommendations to help ensure the physical and intellectual well-being of materials created and managed in digital form ("born digital") that are transferred from donors to archival repositories. The report is presented in four sections, each of which provides an overview of a key area of concern: initial collection review, privacy and intellectual property, key stages in acquiring digital materials, and post-acquisition review by the repository. Each section concludes with two lists of recommendations: one for donors and dealers, and a second for repository staff. Appendixes provide more specific information about possible staffing activities, as well as a list of resources and ready-to-use checklists that incorporate recommendations from throughout the report. Ten archivists and curators from institutions in the United States and United Kingdom collaborated on the report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc234935/
Library Publishing Directory 2014
The first edition of the Library Publishing Directory provides a snapshot of the publishing activities of 115 academic and research libraries, including information about the number and types of publications they produce, the services they offer authors, how they are staffed and funded, and the future plans of institutions that are engaged in this emerging field. In documenting the breadth and depth of activities in this field, this resource aims to articulate the unique value of library publishing; establish it as a significant and growing community of practice; and to raise its visibility within a number of stakeholder communities, including administrators, funding agencies, other scholarly publishers, librarians, and content creators. Specifically it is hoped that this Directory will: • Introduce all readers to the emerging field of library publishing and help articulate its unique characteristics as a distinctive "publishing field." • Facilitate collaboration among library publishers and other publishing entities, especially the university presses and learned societies that share their values. • Alert authors of scholarly content to a range of potential publishing partners dedicated to supporting their experimentation with new forms of scholarly communication and open access business models. The Directory is also available Open Access in several electronic formats through www.librarypublishing.org. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc234934/
El Espejo, Volume 2, 2012
El Espejo literary journal contains writing by Spanish students at the University of North Texas including essays in Spanish literature and linguistics and creative pieces such as poetry and short stories. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130209/
The Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey 2012
The Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey has focused since its inception on capturing an accurate picture of faculty members' practices, attitudes, and needs. In the fifth triennial cycle, fielded in fall 2012, the survey focused on research and teaching practices broadly, as well as the dissemination, collecting, discovery, and access of research and teaching materials. Findings from this cycle of the Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey will provide colleges and universities, libraries, learned societies, and academic publishers with insight into the evolving attitudes and practices of faculty members in the context of substantial environmental change for higher education. The development of the 2012 questionnaire was guided by an advisory committee of librarians, publishers, policy makers, and a scholarly society executive. The overall project was supported by some 20 colleges and universities, learned societies, and publishers / vendors. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc234917/
Appraising our digital investment : sustainability of digitized special collections in ARL libraries
Sponsored by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and conducted by Ithaka S+R, this study provides insight into how ARL libraries are managing and funding the hundreds of digitized special collections they have created and that they believe to be critical to their futures. This is the first survey of ARL institutions that specifically attempts to understand and benchmark the activities and costs of supporting these collections after they are created. By looking at questions of management, costs, funding sources, impact, and outreach, the survey offers data that will deliver insight to all those engaged in sustaining digitized special collections. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc234942/
El Espejo, Volume 3, 2013
El Espejo literary journal contains writing by Spanish students at the University of North Texas including essays in Spanish literature and linguistics and creative pieces such as poetry and short stories. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc146583/
Hacking Secret Ciphers with Python
The book teaches complete beginners how to program in the Python programming language and it features the source code to several ciphers and hacking programs for these ciphers. The programs include the Caesar cipher, transposition cipher, simple substitution cipher, multiplicative and affine ciphers, Vigenere cipher, and hacking programs for each of these ciphers. The final chapters cover the modern RSA cipher and public key cryptography. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc272206/
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM), Vol. 2 No. 1: January-February 2013
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM) is published bimonthly to tell the Library’s stories, to showcase its many talented staff, and to share and promote the use of the resources of the world’s largest library. This issue focuses on presidents and those national celebrations where they are sworn in. Also: sharing Rachmaninoff’s music, preserving our national film heritage and how to register for copyright. The publication is also accessible free online at www.loc.gov/lcm/. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc133019/
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM), Vol. 1 No. 2: November-December 2012
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM) is published bimonthly to tell the Library’s stories, to showcase its many talented staff, and to share and promote the use of the resources of the world’s largest library. The second issue discusses a new exhibition highlighting the personal aspects of the Civil War in America, which also includes a celebration of books that shaped America, the facts behind the Maya calendar and 2012, and the first recipe for pumpkin pie.The publication is also accessible free online at www.loc.gov/lcm/. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc133017/
Outrageous Oral Volume 3: The Dallas Way GLBT History Project
This video recording presents Outrageous Oral Volume 3. For this event, attendees welcomed members of The Dallas Way GLBT History Project to the University of North Texas (UNT) campus. This is a group of community members dedicated to preserving the history of gay life in Dallas, and their Outrageous Oral events bring together artists, activists, and civic leaders to share their stories of life as gay people in the DFW area, pre-Stonewall, pre-DADT, and during the first cataclysmic years of the AIDS Epidemic. These oral histories are alternately hilarious and compelling, heartwarming and devastating. The Digital Scholarship Cooperative (DiSCo) and the UNT Libraries join the students of Glad: UNTs Queer Alliance, and the UNT Multicultural Center in bringing these stories to campus on National Coming Day (October 11, 2012), to help build bridges between UNT and the community, and between generations of gay and trans men and women. The UNT Libraries will be represented tonight by Arturo Ortega, who will share stories of what it was like growing up in Laredo, Texas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc139522/
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM), Vol. 1 No. 1: September-October 2012
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM) is published bimonthly to tell the Library’s stories, to showcase its many talented staff, and to share and promote the use of the resources of the world’s largest library. The publication is also accessible free online at www.loc.gov/lcm/. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc123528/
Aligning National Approaches to Digital Preservation
The "Aligning National Approaches to Digital Preservation" (ANADP) conference was held at the National Library of Estonia, from May 23-25, 2011. More than 125 delegates from more than 20 countries were gathered in Tallinn, Estonia and explored how to create and sustain international collaborations to support the preservation of digital cultural memory. This publication contains a collection of peer-reviewed essays that were developed by conference panels and attendees in the months following ANADP. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc98130/
Core Infrastructure Considerations for Large Digital Libraries
This study examines basic functional aspects of large digital libraries and draws on examples of existing digital libraries to illustrate their varying approaches to storage and content delivery, metadata approaches and harvesting, search and discovery, services and applications, and system sustainability. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc98133/
Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works
The preface states that the work includes citations of articles, books, and technical reports on digital curation, mostly published between 2000 and 2011 in English. The bibliogrphy doesnot cover conference papers, digital media works, editorials, presentation slides, unpublished e-prints, or weblog postings. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc98135/
Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System (OAIS)
This document is a technical Recommended Practice for use in developing a broader consensus on what is required for an archive to provide permanent, or indefinite Long Term, preservation of digital information. This Recommended Practice establishes a common framework of terms and concepts which make up an Open Archival Information System (OAIS). It allows existing and future archives to be more meaningfully compared and contrasted. It provides a basis for further standardization within an archival context and it should promote greater vendor awareness of, and support of, archival requirements. CCSDS has changed the classification of Reference Models from Blue (Recommended Standard) to Magenta (Recommended Practice). Through the process of normal evolution, it is expected that expansion, deletion, or modification of this document may occur. This Recommended Practice is therefore subject to CCSDS document management and change control procedures, which are defined in the Procedures Manual for the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems. Current issue updates document based on input from user community (note). Current versions of CCSDS documents are maintained at the CCSDS Web site: http://www.ccsds.org/ digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc123535/
The Digital Squeeze: Libraries at the Crossroads: the Library Resource Guide Benchmark Study on 2012 Library Spending Plans
Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
The second annual benchmark study of library spending plans from Library Resource Guide explores the wide range of spending and priorities decision-making taking place in 2012 budgets for public, academic and special libraries. Includes year-to-year comparative data. Learn where peer institutions are focusing their scarce investments, based on a study of over 700 participating North American institutions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc133018/
The Digital Public Domain: Foundations for an Open Culture
Digital technology has made culture more accessible than ever before. Texts, audio, pictures and video can easily be produced, disseminated, used and remixed using devices that are increasingly user-friendly and affordable. However, along with this technological democratization comes a paradoxical flipside: the norms regulating culture's use — copyright and related rights — have become increasingly restrictive. This book brings together essays by academics, librarians, entrepreneurs, activists and policy makers, who were all part of the EU-funded Communia project. Together the authors argue that the Public Domain — that is, the informational works owned by all of us, be that literature, music, the output of scientific research, educational material or public sector information — is fundamental to a healthy society. The essays range from more theoretical papers on the history of copyright and the Public Domain, to practical examples and case studies of recent projects that have engaged with the principles of Open Access and Creative Commons licensing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc123530/
Oral Literature in Africa
This revised edition makes Finnegan’s ground-breaking research available to the next generation of scholars. It includes a new introduction, additional images and an updated bibliography, as well as its original chapters on poetry, prose, "drum language” and drama, and an overview of the social, linguistic and historical background of oral literature in Africa. This volume is complemented by original recordings of stories and songs from the Limba country (Sierra Leone), collected by Finnegan during her fieldwork in the late 1960s, digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc123529/
Policy Guidelines for the Development and Promotion of Open Access
UNESCO issued this publication to demystify the concept of Open Access (OA) and to provide concrete steps on putting relevant policies in place. Building capacities in Member States for Open Access is a necessary but not sufficient condition for promotion of the concept. Creating an enabling policy environment for OA is therefore a priority. This publication will serve the needs of OA policy development at the government, institutional and funding agency level. The overall objective of the Policy Guidelines is to promote Open Access in Member States by facilitating understanding of all relevant issues related to Open Access. The guidelines are not prescriptive in nature, but are suggestive to facilitate knowledge-based decision-making to adopt OA policies and strengthen national research systems. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc141806/
New Roles for New Times: Digital Curation for Preservation
The report looks at how libraries are developing new roles and services in the arena of digital curation for preservation. The authors consider a "promising set of new roles that libraries are currently carving out in the digital arena," describing emerging strategies for libraries and librarians and highlighting collaborative approaches through a series of case studies of key programs and projects. They also provide helpful definitions and offer recommendations for libraries considering how best to make or expand their investments in digital curation. Issues and developments within and across the sciences and humanities are considered. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc31520/
Digital Curation and Preservation Bibliography 2010
The preface states that the work includes citations of articles, books, and technical reports on digital curation, mostly published between 2000 and 2010. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc33299/
El Espejo, Volume 1, 2011
El Espejo literary journal contains writing by Spanish students at the University of North Texas including essays in Spanish literature and linguistics and creative pieces such as poetry and short stories. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130208/
[Food Rule: After dinner, walk a mile]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses how one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82792/
[Food Rule: Anything ending in bar is probably not good for you]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82785/
[Food Rule: Avoid beverages that will rot your oral cavity with just one sip]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82790/
[Food Rule: Avoid the Salt-shaker]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82771/
[Food Rule: Cook your food from raw state instead of eating ready-made processed food]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82783/
[Food Rule: Diversify your diet; taste the rainbow]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82772/
[Food Rule: Don't buy processed foods]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82781/
[Food Rule: Eat foods as close to their natural state as possible]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82791/
[Food Rule: Eat foods that are harvested by a tractor, not ones made where hair nets are a factor]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82773/
[Food Rule: Eat organic meat that is lean, so you can be a healthy Mean Green]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82776/
[Food Rule: Eating more legs of four, will have you knocking on heaven's door]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82779/
[Food Rule: If food comes from the ground then keep it around]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82788/
[Food Rule: If it never goes bad; it was never good]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82798/
[Food Rule: If it's natural and contains Potassium in it, eat it]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82780/
[Food Rule: If the dinosaurs would eat it, you should, too]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82787/
[Food Rule: If you don't do your own salt, it is your fault]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82778/
[Food Rule: If you don't want your weight to be a pain, make sure to eat plenty of whole grain]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82795/
[Food Rule: If you want it, have it, as long as it's in moderation]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses how one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82786/
[Food Rule: Listen to your mom and eat your vegetables]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses the kinds of foods one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82782/
[Food Rule: Make eating an event]
Food rule written by a UNT student as part of a class assignment to create guidelines for healthier diet habits. This statement uses the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as Michael Pollan's book, Food Rules: An Eater's Manual, to support a rule that addresses how one should eat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc82799/
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