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3 Rs of RDA: A Review and Refresher on RDA for Audiovisual Materials
Presentation for the 2015 Church and Synagogue Library Association Conference. This presentation discusses the three Rs of RDA and a review and refresher on RDA for audiovisual materials.
Content, Media, Carrier Types for Sound and Moving Image Resources
Handout accompanying a presentation for the 2015 Church and Synagogue Library Association Conference. This handout discusses content, media, carrier types for sound and moving image resources.
Holy Spirit Episcopal School: A Bilingual School in Tela, Atlántida, Honduras, of Holy Spirit Episcopal Church/ Iglesia Episcopal Espíritu Santo, a Ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of Honduras
Presentation for the 2015 Church and Synagogue Library Association Conference. This presentation discusses Holy Spirit Episcopal School, a bilingual school in Tela, Atlántida, Honduras.
Taking Stock: Sharing Responsibility for Print Preservation
In "Taking Stock: Sharing Responsibility for Print Preservation," Roger Schonfeld surveys the progress made in the past decade, and warns against the conflation of collaborative print management and improved access to collections with preservation. This issue brief was presented at Preserving America's Print Resources II: A North American Summit in Berkeley, California, on June 25, 2015. The full conference program is available at
Library of Congress: Strong Leadership Needed to Address Serious Information Technology Management Weaknesses
The Library of Congress has established policies and procedures for managing its information technology (IT) resources, but significant weaknesses across several areas have hindered their effectiveness: -Strategic planning: The Library does not have an IT strategic plan that is aligned with the overall agency strategic plan and establishes goals, measures, and strategies. This leaves the Library without a clear direction for its use of IT. -Investment management: Although the Library obligated at least $119 million on IT for fiscal year 2014, it is not effectively managing its investments. To its credit, the Library has established structures for managing IT investments—including a review board and a process for selecting investments. However, the board does not review all key investments, and its roles and responsibilities are not always clearly defined. Additionally, the Library does not have a complete process for tracking its IT spending or an accurate inventory of its assets. For example, while the inventory identifies over 18,000 computers currently in use, officials stated that the Library has fewer than 6,500. Until the Library addresses these weaknesses, its ability to make informed decisions will be impaired. -Information security and privacy: The Library assigned roles and responsibilities and developed policies and procedures for securing its information and systems. However, its implementation of key security and privacy management controls was uneven. For example, the Library's system inventory did not include all key systems. Additionally, the Library did not always fully define and test security controls for its systems, remediate weaknesses in a timely manner, and assess the risks to the privacy of personal information in its systems. Such deficiencies also contributed to weaknesses in technical security controls, putting the Library's systems and information at risk of compromise. -Service management: The Library's Information Technology Services (ITS) division is primarily responsible for providing IT services to the agency's operating units. While ITS has catalogued these services, it has not fully developed agreements with the other units specifying expected levels of performance. Further, the other units were often not satisfied with these services, which has contributed to them independently pursuing their own IT activities. This in turn has resulted in units purchasing unnecessary hardware and software, maintaining separate e-mail environments, and managing overlapping or duplicative IT activities. -Leadership: The Library does not have the leadership needed to address these IT management weaknesses. For example, the agency's chief information officer (CIO) position does not have adequate authority over or oversight of the Library's IT. Additionally, the Library has not had a permanent CIO since 2012 and has had five temporary CIOs in the interim. In January 2015, at the conclusion of GAO's review, officials stated that that the Library plans to draft an IT strategic plan within 90 days and hire a permanent CIO. If it follows through on these plans, the Library will be in a stronger position to address its IT management weaknesses and more effectively support its mission.
Six-Shooters and Shifting Sands: The Wild West Life of Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones
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Many well-read students, historians, and loyal aficionados of Texas Ranger lore know the name of Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones (1856-1893), who died on the Texas-Mexico border in a shootout with Mexican rustlers. In Six-Shooters and Shifting Sands, Bob Alexander has now penned the first full-length biography of this important nineteenth-century Texas Ranger. At an early age Frank Jones, a native Texan, would become a Frontier Battalion era Ranger. His enlistment with the Rangers coincided with their transition from Indian fighters to lawmen. While serving in the Frontier Battalion officers' corps of Company D, Frank Jones supervised three of the four “great” captains of that era: J.A. Brooks, John H. Rogers, and John R. Hughes. Besides Austin Ira Aten and his younger brothers Calvin Grant Aten and Edwin Dunlap Aten, Captain Jones also managed law enforcement activities of numerous other noteworthy Rangers, such as Philip Cuney "P.C." Baird, Benjamin Dennis Lindsey, Bazzell Lamar "Baz" Outlaw, J. Walter Durbin, Jim King, Frank Schmid, and Charley Fusselman, to name just a few. Frank Jones’ law enforcing life was anything but boring. Not only would he find himself dodging bullets and returning fire, but those Rangers under his supervision would also experience gunplay. Of all the Texas Ranger companies, Company D contributed the highest number of on-duty deaths within Texas Ranger ranks. The contents include: "Dragged to the ground lanced and scalped" -- "Beneath the heel of an indignant legislature" -- "We fought under the black flag" -- "Several shots and run him into the river" -- "Sworn enemy to Rangers and sheriffs" -- "Sixty thousand dollars to spend" -- "Most bold, high-handed murder" -- "Damnable act of savagery" -- "He caught for a pistol" -- "A strong undercurrent of excitement" -- "By God, they will never come back" -- "Just plain legal assassination" -- "The shooting was promiscuous and lively" -- "We have been compelled to do some killing" -- "Boys, I am killed".
Report on the Maturity of the Library’s System Development Life Cycle Processes and Procedures
The System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) process applies to information system development projects ensuring that all functional and user requirements are met by using a structured and standardized process during all phases of a system’s life cycle. Systems developed according to information technology (IT) best practices are more likely to provide secure and reliable long‐term performance. The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) engaged CliftonLarsonAllen’s (CLA’s) to perform an audit of the Library’s SDLC process to assess the maturity of the Library’s current policies and practices and to evaluate the efficiency of Information Technology Services’ (ITS) process for structuring, planning, and controlling the development of the Library’s vital information systems. This included an assessment of ITS’ compliance with the Library’s SDLC policy and the application of generally accepted IT best practices. In its report, CLA identified several weaknesses in the Library’s SDLC process that places the Library at risk of developing IT systems that are not adequately documented and lack cost and performance data needed to properly monitor and make prudent IT investment decisions. By optimizing its current SDLC process, the Library can mitigate these risks while improving efficiency and governance of IT system development.
Common Ground: Exploring Compatibilities Between the Linked Data Models of the Library of Congress and OCLC
Since 2011, OCLC researchers have been experimenting with as a vehicle for exposing library metadata to Web search engines in a format they seek and understand. is sponsored by Bing, Google, Yahoo! and Yandex as a common vocabulary for creating structured data markup on Web pages. OCLC’s experiments led to the 2012 publication of metadata elements expressed as linked data on 300 million catalog records accessible from In 2011, BIBFRAME was launched by the Library of Congress (LC) as an initiative to develop a linked data alternative to MARC, building on the Library’s experience providing linked data access to its authority files. In the past year and a half, OCLC has focused on the tasks related to the use of refining the technical infrastructure and data architecture for at-scale publication of linked data for library resources in the broader Web, and investigating the promise of as a common ground between the language of the information-seeking public and professional stewards of bibliographic description. BIBFRAME has focused on publishing additional vocabulary and facilitating implementation and testing. These new developments prompt the need to re-examine the relationship between the LC and OCLC models for library linked data. This document is an executive summary of a more detailed technical analysis that will be released later this year.
Economics: From the Dismal Science to the Moral Science: The Moral Economics of Kendall P. Cochran
Adam Smith published The Theory of Moral Sentiments in 1759 and established the ethical foundation for The Wealth of Nations (1776) as well as the important role played by custom and fashion in shaping behaviors and outcomes. Kendall P. Cochran believed in Smith’s emphasis on value-driven analysis and seeking solutions to major problems of the day. Cochran believed that economists moved too far in the direction of analysis free of words like ought and should and devoted his career to establishing that economics is a moral science. A recent study by two Harvard professors, Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff, Growth in a Time of Debt (2010), asserted that healthy economic growth and high levels of government debt are incompatible. These conclusions are associated with the austerity movement, which calls for policymakers to reduce government spending in order to reduce the government’s debt and improve long-term growth prospects. The austerity movement has been used to justify the sharp decline in public sector employment that has restrained job growth since the recession of 2007. In 2013, a graduate student named Thomas Herndon discovered an error in the calculations of Reinhart and Rogoff, publishing his findings in a paper co-authored by his professors, called "Does High Public Debt Consistently Stifle Economic Growth? A Critique of Reinhart and Rogoff." These findings call the entire austerity movement into question, causing many to reconsider the current obsession with reducing the government debt during a time of economic stagnation. Cochran would have held a celebration to toast Herndon and his professors for their work, not only for the sake of technical accuracy, but also because the policy prescriptions associated with the austerity movement are misguided and harmful to the unemployed and underemployed during times of economic hardship. Cochran’s articles are significant at this time because he is able to argue persuasively that economists have a moral obligation to provide policy recommendations that are consistent with a social agenda of fairness and opportunity. While many agree with Adam Smith that individuals are motivated by self-interest, it does not follow that any action or policy that promotes an individual’s self-interest is therefore worthwhile or beneficial from society’s perspective. If a person is handsomely rewarded for placing a bomb in the city center, does the potential gain for that individual justify the harm to society? Cochran makes an eloquent case that economists must identify instances in which government policy can and should be used to protect and promote society’s well-being.
From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan: General Curtis E. LeMay's Letters to His Wife Helen, 1941–1945
In 1942, Colonel Curtis E. LeMay and his 305th Bomb Group left Syracuse, New York, bound for England, where they joined the Eighth Air Force and Royal Air Force in war against Germany and her allies. Over the next three years LeMay led American air forces in Europe, India, China, and the Pacific against the Axis powers. His efforts yielded advancement through the chain of command to the rank of Major General in command of the XXIst Bomber Command, the most effective strategic bombing force of the war. LeMay’s activities in World War II are well-documented, but his personal history is less thoroughly recorded. Throughout the war he wrote hundreds of letters to his wife, Helen, and daughter, Jane. They are published for the first time in this volume, weaved together with meticulously researched narrative essays buttressed by both official and unofficial sources and supplemented with extensive footnotes. History remembers “LeMay, the Commander” well. From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan, will yield a better understanding of “LeMay, the Man.”
Mapping the Future of Scholarly Publishing
The National Science Communication Institute (nSCI) hosted a conference in late 2013 to explore the broad issue related to scholarly publishing. The Open Science Initiative (OSI) is a working group convened by the National Science Communication Institute (nSCI) in October 2014 to discuss the issues regarding improving open access for the betterment of science and to recommend possible solutions. The following document summarizes the wide range of issues, perspectives and recommendations from this group’s online conversation during November and December 2014 and January 2015. The 112 participants who signed up to participate in this conversation were drawn mostly from the academic, research, and library communities. Most of these 112 were not active in this conversation, but a healthy diversity of key perspectives was still represented. Individual participants may not agree with all of the viewpoints described herein, but participants agree that this document reflects the spirit and content of the conversation.
Near-Death Experiences While Drowning: Dying Is Not the End of Consciousness!
Due to advances in resuscitation and defibrillation practices over the past decades, people are returning from the brink of death in numbers unprecedented in human history. Of the millions of people who survive drowning each year, about 20% report a near-death experience (NDE): a reported memory of profound psychological events that contain certain paranormal, transcendental, and mystical features. NDEs are usually hyperreal and lucid experiences dominated by pleasurable feelings and more rarely dominated by distressed feelings. This book presents a summary of 40 years of research on NDEs. It contains 22 drowning NDE accounts and recommendations for how water safety professionals can use NDE-related information in their work with people they successfully resuscitate.
ETD Lifecycle Management Tools Manual
The IMLS-funded Lifecycle Management of ETDs project has researched, developed, and/or documented a suite of modular Lifecycle Management Tools for curating electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs). The project targeted the following curation activities: Virus Checking, Format Recognition, Preservation Event Record-Keeping, and Simple ETD & Metadata Submission. This manual describes how to implement Lifecycle Management Tools for those activities. The manual is written for ETD Program Managers. It describes a general rationale and use case for each curation activity mentioned above in the context of an ETD program. While the technical and administrative implementations of ETD programs are diverse, this manual includes generalized recommendations for where and when to deploy the tools in an ETD submission workflow. ETD Program Managers are encouraged to coordinate with the full range of stakeholders (including the graduate schools, libraries, campus IT, and vendors) to adapt tools to their implementation.
National Digital Newspaper Program: Impact Study 2004 – 2014
During the summer of 2014, the Division of Preservation and Access sought to evaluate the impact of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) since its beginnings in 2004. Information about the program was obtained through interviews of project directors, performance reports from the awardees, and a survey of NDNP participants developed by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress. Reports from the state partners on their projects were analyzed and examined the ways in which Chronicling America resources are being used. This document summarizes the results of the investigations and demonstrates the impact of NDNP through a constellation of examples. Among other things, the impact study identifies several projects that are taking advantage of this massive, centralized resource as scholars experiment with data mining tools for humanities research. The report concludes in summarizing many project directors' view in saying that the benefits of the National Digital Newspaper Program far surpassed anything anyone could have imagined when the program was launched a decade ago. In sum, NDNP stands as a fine example of what a federal agencies working collaboratively with state partners can achieve.
Intellectual Property: Law & the Information Society—Cases and Materials
This book is an introduction to intellectual property law, the set of private legal rights that allows individuals and corporations to control intangible creations and marks—from logos to novels to drug formulae—and the exceptions and limitations that define those rights. It focuses on the three graphmain forms of US federal intellectual property—trademark, copyright and patent—but many of the ideas discussed here apply far beyond those legal areas and far beyond the law of the United States. The book is intended to be a textbook for the basic Intellectual Property class, but because it is an open coursebook, which can be freely edited and customized, it is also suitable for an undergraduate class, or for a business, library studies, communications or other graduate school class. Each chapter contains cases and secondary readings and a set of problems or role-playing exercises involving the material. The problems range from a video of the Napster oral argument to counseling clients about search engines and trademarks, applying the First Amendment to digital rights management and copyright or commenting on the Supreme Court’s new rulings on gene patents.
Sustaining the Digital Humanities : Host Institution Support Beyond the Start-up Period
As more and more scholars experiment with digital methods and with building digital collections, what measures are in place to make sure that the fruits of these labors are kept vital for the long term? Library directors and chief information officers sense that there is interest on the part of faculty, but does this mean they need to invest in a digital humanities center and hire new staff or just reconfigure the people and resources they already have? First and foremost, what does university leadership seek to gain from such an investment? This study seeks to address the fate of digital research resources - whether they be digital collections of scholarly or other materials, portals, encyclopedias, mapping tools, crowdsourced transcription projects, visualization tools, or other original and innovative projects that may be created by professors, library, or IT staff. Such projects have the potential to provide valuable tools and information to an international audience of learners. Without careful planning and execution, however, they can also all too easily slip between the cracks and quickly become obsolete.
The Evolving Scholarly Record
The scholarly record is evolving into a corpus of material vastly different from its previous print-based version. While in the past the scholarly record was largely defined by the formally published monographic and journal literatures, its boundaries are now both expanding and blurring, driven by changes in research practices, as well as changing perceptions of the long-term value of certain forms of scholarly materials. Understanding the nature, scope, and evolutionary trends of the scholarly record is an important concern in many quarters—for libraries, for publishers, for funders, and of course for scholars themselves. This report presents a framework to help organize and drive discussions about the evolving scholarly record. The framework provides a high-level view of the categories of material the scholarly record potentially encompasses, as well as the key stakeholder roles associated with the creation, management, and use of the scholarly record.
Comparative Analysis of Distributed Digital Preservation (DDP) Systems
The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)-funded Chronicles in Preservation project ( completed this Comparative Analysis of three Distributed Digital Preservation systems to analyze their underlying technologies and methodologies: -Chronopolis using iRODS ( -University of North Texas using Coda ( -MetaArchive Cooperative using LOCKSS ( This Comparative Analysis is not intended to designate any of the Distributed Digital Preservation (DDP) systems as superior or inferior to one another in any of the areas disclosed. On the contrary, digital preservation is often best served by maintaining a variety of solutions, and each of the three DDP systems have partnered actively with one another on several digital preservation initiatives and are learning constantly from one another’s approaches. The Chronicles in Preservation project, and more specifically, this Comparative Analysis, has been undertaken by these three systems in order to test, document, and refine their processes, not in isolation, but as a collaborative effort.
Preservation Health Check: Monitoring Threats to Digital Repository Content
The Open Planets Foundation (OPF) has suggested the need for digital preservation repositories to perform periodic “health checks” as a routine part of their preservation activities. In the same way that doctors monitor basic health properties of their patients to spot indications of infirmity, repositories should monitor a set of properties associated with “preservation health” to provide an early warning of potential threats to the ongoing security of the archived digital objects in their care. The Preservation Health Check (PHC) project, undertaken as a joint effort by OPF and OCLC Research, aims to evaluate the usefulness of the preservation metadata created and maintained by operational repositories for assessing basic preservation properties. The PHC project seeks to develop an implementable logic to support preservation health checks of this kind, and to test this logic against the store of preservation metadata maintained by an operational preservation repository. The Bibliothèque Nationale de France has agreed to share their preservation metadata in support of this project. The authors aim is to advance the use of preservation metadata as an evidence base for conducting preservation health checks according to a standardized, widely-applicable protocol. Doing so opens up possibilities for internal or third-party threat assessment services that can be used for internal repository planning and auditing/certification. Accordingly, this paper provides background on the problem addressed by the PHC project, the authors' approach for operationalizing the concept of a preservation health check, some preliminary findings, and next steps. The report is important for anyone involved with defining, implementing and promoting the use of preservation metadata and for those trying to get a handle on how preservation metadata works with threat models.
Guidance Documents for Lifecycle Management of ETDs
In 2011, a research team led by the University of North Texas, the Educopia Institute/MetaArchive Cooperative, and the worldwide Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD), began studying the production, dissemination, and preservation of Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs). The original intent was to develop and disseminate documentation for academic libraries that would help curators better understand and address the preservation challenges presented by these new digital collections. As researchers from the libraries of University of North Texas, Virginia Tech, Rice University, Boston College, Indiana State University, Penn State, and the University of Arizona began to grapple with ETD lifecycle management issues, they quickly realized that librarians were but one of many academic stakeholder groups that work collaboratively to produce and maintain ETD collections. Studying the library role in isolation was neither feasible nor helpful. The scope of our work increased to encompass the roles and responsibilities of core stakeholders in the ETD lifecycle: students, faculty, administrators, technologists, commercial vendors, and librarians. The resulting Guidance Documents address areas of interest to ETD program planners, managers, and curators. They will help this extended set of stakeholders understand, document, and address the administrative, legal, and technical challenges presented by ETDs—from submission to long-term preservation. The authors have aimed to be comprehensive in their treatment of ETD programs, and encourage readers to review all of the Guidance Document to gain a holistic view. However, they have also highlighted the sections of each document relevant to 4 roles in ETD programs: institutional administrators, submission staff, access and repository staff, and IT staff.
Guidelines for Digital Newspaper Preservation Readiness
The Guidelines for Digital Newspaper Preservation Readiness address a specific set of preservation challenges faced by libraries, archives, historical societies, and other organizations that curate substantial collections of digital newspaper content. The Guidelines are intended to inform curators and collection managers at libraries, archives, historical societies, and other such memory organizations about various practical readiness activities that they can take. They provide links to technical resources that curators can either implement themselves or work with their technical staff to implement. The Guidelines (Version 1.0) only deal with digital newspapers at this point, not broadcast or other forms of digital news.
A Guide to the Best Revenue Models and Funding Sources for your Digital Resources
With the support of the Jisc-led Strategic Content Alliance (SCA), Ithaka S+R has developed this guide to support those who are actively managing digital projects and are seeking to develop funding models that will permit them to continue investing in their projects, for the benefit of their users, over time. This report updates Sustainability and Revenue Models for Online Academic Resources (2008) in two major ways: first, by expanding the list of revenue models covered in order to take into account emerging models, including highlighting those methods that are compatible with open access. Second, the report places the notion of ‘revenue generation’ in the context of the fuller range of funding activities we have observed in higher education and the cultural sector. In addition to practices more often seen in the commercial world like advertising and corporate sponsorships, the report devotes time to discussions of a range of philanthropic sources of support as well as support offered by host institutions.
A Beginner’s Guide to Persistent Identifiers
The essay discusses specific concerns of digital humanists in hopes of bridging the gap between how library directors and digital humanities researchers think. It suggests many ways to respond to the needs of digital humanists, and creating a Digital Humanities center is appropriate in relatively few circumstances. The essay recommends that a “Digital Humanities-friendly” environment may be more effective than a Digital Humanities Center but that library culture may need to evolve in order for librarians to be seen as effective Digital Humanities partners. The authors conclude that what we call “The Digital Humanities” today will soon be considered “The Humanities.” Supporting Digital Humanities scholarship is not much different than supporting digital scholarship in any discipline. Increasingly, digital scholarship is simply scholarship.
Does Every Research Library Need a Digital Humanities Center?
The essay discusses specific concerns of digital humanists in hopes of bridging the gap between how library directors and digital humanities researchers think. It suggests many ways to respond to the needs of digital humanists, and creating a Digital Humanities center is appropriate in relatively few circumstances. The essay recommends that a “Digital Humanities-friendly” environment may be more effective than a Digital Humanities Center but that library culture may need to evolve in order for librarians to be seen as effective Digital Humanities partners. The authors conclude that what we call “The Digital Humanities” today will soon be considered “The Humanities.” Supporting Digital Humanities scholarship is not much different than supporting digital scholarship in any discipline. Increasingly, digital scholarship is simply scholarship.
Participatory Design in Academic Libraries: New Reports and Findings
This report looks at how staff at eight academic institutions gained new insight about how students and faculty use their libraries, and how the staff are using these findings to improve library technologies, space, and services. Participatory design is a relatively recent approach to understanding library user behavior. It is based on techniques used in anthropological and ethnographic observation. The report is based on a series of presentations at the second CLIR Seminar on Participatory Design of Academic Libraries, held at the University of Rochester’s River Campus June 5-7, 2013. Chapters focus on projects at the University of Colorado, Boulder; Colby College; University of Connecticut; Columbia University; Rush University Medical Center; Purdue University; Northwestern University; and the University of Rochester. David Lindahl, of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, provided the keynote.
Denton Fracking Referendum Project
On November 4, 2014 Denton residents voted on a proposition calling for the prohibition of hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking", within the city limits of Denton, Texas. The hydraulic fracturing process involves the use of water, sand and/or chemical additives pumped under high pressure to fracture rock formations and improve the flow of natural gas, oil or other hydrocarbons. This referendum was passed by voters and was the first permanent ban on fracking in the State of Texas. This collection is an effort to document news and viewpoints related to the proposed fracking ban and includes a compilation of web pages crawled in late 2014.
Fast Lane to Python: A Quick, Sensible Route to the Joys of Python Coding
This book aims to enable the reader to quickly acquire a Python foundation. The material particularly feel quite comfortable to anyone with background in an object-oriented programming (OOP) language such as C++ or Java. Even if ones lack this background, they will still be able to read these sections, but will probably need to go through them more slowly than those who do know OOP. Some Linux knowledge would also be helpful, but it certainly is not required. Python is used on Windows and Macintosh platforms too, not just Linux. So, most statements here made for the Linux context will also apply to Macs as well. The author acknowledged that programming is a personal, creative activity, so everyone has his/her own view.
The Internet's Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz
he Internet's Own Boy depicts the life of American computer programmer, writer, political organizer and Internet activist Aaron Swartz. It features interviews with his family and friends as well as the internet luminaries who worked with him. The film tells his story up to his eventual suicide after a legal battle, and explores the questions of access to information and civil liberties that drove his work.
[University of North Texas: Campus Map, 2014/15]
Campus map of the University of North Texas, for 2014-2015. Bodies of water are marked with blue while streets are gray. Words are either green or black in color. Numbers are marked above while letters mark the left side. There is a compass pointing north printed in the mid-left section of the map for reference, while a mini-map of the Discovery Park is provided on the upper left corner. On the very right is the legend, titled, "Map Index."
[University of North Texas: Campus Map, Parking Map, 2014-2015]
The map here displays where there is on-campus parking at the University of North Texas, for 2014-2015. There are two pages to this map piece. On the upper left corner of the map is the UNT logo in green, black, and white. It states, "University of North Texas: A green light to greatness." Found on the mid-left is a gray compass pointing north, for reference. Streets are marked gray and parking locations are color coded, based on parking permissions (e.g., reserved parking is color coded green). A map key is provided on the mid-right, which also covers parking garages, meter parking, planned construction, bicycle racks, crosswalks, emergency phone locations, ADA ('handicapped') parking, and more. Next to the map legend, on the left side, is information on the speed limit, a sign encouraging people to "share the road," and the UNT Smoke-Free logo. Below the map legend is the contact information for the Parking & Transportation Services and the UNT Police Department. Located on the second page is a mini-map of the UNT Discovery Park (upper left corner), Mean Green Village, and the Apogee Stadium (both on the lower right corner). Information on visitor parking is provided on the right side of the Discovery Park mini-map, while information to purchase it can be found on the lower left corner of the page.
Vann Victorian Collection: An Exhibit at UNT Libraries Special Collections
The Vann Victorian Collection is a treasure of the University of North Texas Libraries and an exceptional resource for the study of Victorian literature. This exhibit showcases some pieces from the collection, including rare first editions, part-issue editions, and association copies. Dr. J. Don Vann, Professor Emeritus at UNT, curated this exhibit. Don and Dolores Vann began collecting Victorian books in 1962, when they acquired a first edition of Dickens’s Bleak House. They spent the summer of 1965 in London, conducting research in the British Library and buying first editions of works by Charles Dickens and William Makepeace Thackeray. During their subsequent trips to London, the Vanns came to know many of the city’s booksellers and were offered first editions they kept hidden from all but their most favorite customers. In 2004 Don and Dolores established the Vann Victorian Endowment to provide a permanent fund to purchase Victorian books for the Vann Victorian Collection in Special Collections at the University of North Texas Libraries. Since 2004 the Vanns have made additional contributions to the collection, most recently in 2014.
Research Data Management Principles, Practices, and Prospects
This report examines how research institutions are responding to data management requirements of the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and other federal agencies. It also considers what role, if any, academic libraries and the library and information science profession should have in supporting researchers’ data management needs. University of North Texas (UNT) Library Director Martin Halbert opens the report with an overview of the DataRes Project, a two-year investigation of data management practices conducted at UNT with colleagues Spencer D. C. Keralis, Shannon Stark, and William E. Moen. His introduction is followed by a series of papers that were presented at the DataRes Symposium that UNT organized in December 2012.
Searching for Sustainability: Strategies from Eight Digitized Special Collections
This report aims to address one of the biggest challenges facing libraries and cultural heritage organizations: how to move their special collections into the 21st century through digitization while developing successful strategies to make sure those collections remain accessible and relevant over time. Through a cooperative agreement as part of the National Leadership Grants Program, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) funded the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), in partnership with Ithaka S+R, to undertake in-depth case studies of institutions that have worked to build the audience, infrastructure, and funding models necessary to maintain and grow their digital collections. The eight collections profiled provide useful models and examples of good practice for project leaders to consider when digitizing their own materials. We hope that these case studies will encourage greater discussion among individuals in the academic library and cultural heritage communities about the reasons why they invest so much time and energy in the creation and ongoing management of their digitized special collections, the goals they set for them, and the planning needed to realize those aims. These questions become even more pressing in an environment where the traditional sources of funding for digitization are beginning to wane. In the coming years, the ability to identify secure sources of support and to demonstrate impact over time will undoubtedly become increasingly important.
Born Digital: Guidance for Donors, Dealers, and Archival Repositories
The report provides recommendations to help ensure the physical and intellectual well-being of materials created and managed in digital form ("born digital") that are transferred from donors to archival repositories. The report is presented in four sections, each of which provides an overview of a key area of concern: initial collection review, privacy and intellectual property, key stages in acquiring digital materials, and post-acquisition review by the repository. Each section concludes with two lists of recommendations: one for donors and dealers, and a second for repository staff. Appendixes provide more specific information about possible staffing activities, as well as a list of resources and ready-to-use checklists that incorporate recommendations from throughout the report. Ten archivists and curators from institutions in the United States and United Kingdom collaborated on the report.
Library Publishing Directory 2014
The first edition of the Library Publishing Directory provides a snapshot of the publishing activities of 115 academic and research libraries, including information about the number and types of publications they produce, the services they offer authors, how they are staffed and funded, and the future plans of institutions that are engaged in this emerging field. In documenting the breadth and depth of activities in this field, this resource aims to articulate the unique value of library publishing; establish it as a significant and growing community of practice; and to raise its visibility within a number of stakeholder communities, including administrators, funding agencies, other scholarly publishers, librarians, and content creators. Specifically it is hoped that this Directory will: • Introduce all readers to the emerging field of library publishing and help articulate its unique characteristics as a distinctive "publishing field." • Facilitate collaboration among library publishers and other publishing entities, especially the university presses and learned societies that share their values. • Alert authors of scholarly content to a range of potential publishing partners dedicated to supporting their experimentation with new forms of scholarly communication and open access business models. The Directory is also available Open Access in several electronic formats through
The Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey 2012
The Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey has focused since its inception on capturing an accurate picture of faculty members' practices, attitudes, and needs. In the fifth triennial cycle, fielded in fall 2012, the survey focused on research and teaching practices broadly, as well as the dissemination, collecting, discovery, and access of research and teaching materials. Findings from this cycle of the Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey will provide colleges and universities, libraries, learned societies, and academic publishers with insight into the evolving attitudes and practices of faculty members in the context of substantial environmental change for higher education. The development of the 2012 questionnaire was guided by an advisory committee of librarians, publishers, policy makers, and a scholarly society executive. The overall project was supported by some 20 colleges and universities, learned societies, and publishers / vendors.
Appraising our digital investment : sustainability of digitized special collections in ARL libraries
Sponsored by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and conducted by Ithaka S+R, this study provides insight into how ARL libraries are managing and funding the hundreds of digitized special collections they have created and that they believe to be critical to their futures. This is the first survey of ARL institutions that specifically attempts to understand and benchmark the activities and costs of supporting these collections after they are created. By looking at questions of management, costs, funding sources, impact, and outreach, the survey offers data that will deliver insight to all those engaged in sustaining digitized special collections.
Denton Plan 2030
This is the official website for the Denton Plan 2030. Denton Plan 2030 is an effort by the city of Denton, Texas to update its comprehensive plan for the future growth and development of Denton. The Denton Plan involves input from local residents, as well as the Denton City Council's Planning and Zoning Commission and the Denton Planning Department. The site includes information about the contents of the plan, the planning process, how to get involved, local events, press coverage, and contact information. This item includes a compilation of archived webpages crawled on a semiannual basis.
Glasstire: Visual Art News and Reviews
This is the official website for Glasstire, an online magazine that covers visual art in Texas and Southern California. Founded in 2001, Glasstire was one of the earliest online art journals in the United States. It is a non-profit publication supported in part by grants from The Houston Endowment, The Brown Foundation, the the National Endowment for the Arts, the Greater Houston Community Foundation, the City of Houston through Houston Arts Alliance, and the Texas Commission for the Arts. It includes articles, news about local art events, videos, and classifieds.
Hacking Secret Ciphers with Python
The book teaches complete beginners how to program in the Python programming language and it features the source code to several ciphers and hacking programs for these ciphers. The programs include the Caesar cipher, transposition cipher, simple substitution cipher, multiplicative and affine ciphers, Vigenere cipher, and hacking programs for each of these ciphers. The final chapters cover the modern RSA cipher and public key cryptography.
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM), Vol. 2 No. 1: January-February 2013
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM) is published bimonthly to tell the Library’s stories, to showcase its many talented staff, and to share and promote the use of the resources of the world’s largest library. This issue focuses on presidents and those national celebrations where they are sworn in. Also: sharing Rachmaninoff’s music, preserving our national film heritage and how to register for copyright. The publication is also accessible free online at
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM), Vol. 1 No. 2: November-December 2012
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM) is published bimonthly to tell the Library’s stories, to showcase its many talented staff, and to share and promote the use of the resources of the world’s largest library. The second issue discusses a new exhibition highlighting the personal aspects of the Civil War in America, which also includes a celebration of books that shaped America, the facts behind the Maya calendar and 2012, and the first recipe for pumpkin pie.The publication is also accessible free online at
Outrageous Oral Volume 3: The Dallas Way GLBT History Project
This video recording presents Outrageous Oral Volume 3. For this event, attendees welcomed members of The Dallas Way GLBT History Project to the University of North Texas (UNT) campus. This is a group of community members dedicated to preserving the history of gay life in Dallas, and their Outrageous Oral events bring together artists, activists, and civic leaders to share their stories of life as gay people in the DFW area, pre-Stonewall, pre-DADT, and during the first cataclysmic years of the AIDS Epidemic. These oral histories are alternately hilarious and compelling, heartwarming and devastating. The Digital Scholarship Cooperative (DiSCo) and the UNT Libraries join the students of Glad: UNTs Queer Alliance, and the UNT Multicultural Center in bringing these stories to campus on National Coming Day (October 11, 2012), to help build bridges between UNT and the community, and between generations of gay and trans men and women. The UNT Libraries will be represented tonight by Arturo Ortega, who will share stories of what it was like growing up in Laredo, Texas.
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM), Vol. 1 No. 1: September-October 2012
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM) is published bimonthly to tell the Library’s stories, to showcase its many talented staff, and to share and promote the use of the resources of the world’s largest library. The publication is also accessible free online at
Aligning National Approaches to Digital Preservation
The "Aligning National Approaches to Digital Preservation" (ANADP) conference was held at the National Library of Estonia, from May 23-25, 2011. More than 125 delegates from more than 20 countries were gathered in Tallinn, Estonia and explored how to create and sustain international collaborations to support the preservation of digital cultural memory. This publication contains a collection of peer-reviewed essays that were developed by conference panels and attendees in the months following ANADP.
Core Infrastructure Considerations for Large Digital Libraries
This study examines basic functional aspects of large digital libraries and draws on examples of existing digital libraries to illustrate their varying approaches to storage and content delivery, metadata approaches and harvesting, search and discovery, services and applications, and system sustainability.
Digital Curation Bibliography: Preservation and Stewardship of Scholarly Works
The preface states that the work includes citations of articles, books, and technical reports on digital curation, mostly published between 2000 and 2011 in English. The bibliogrphy doesnot cover conference papers, digital media works, editorials, presentation slides, unpublished e-prints, or weblog postings.
Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System (OAIS)
This document is a technical Recommended Practice for use in developing a broader consensus on what is required for an archive to provide permanent, or indefinite Long Term, preservation of digital information. This Recommended Practice establishes a common framework of terms and concepts which make up an Open Archival Information System (OAIS). It allows existing and future archives to be more meaningfully compared and contrasted. It provides a basis for further standardization within an archival context and it should promote greater vendor awareness of, and support of, archival requirements. CCSDS has changed the classification of Reference Models from Blue (Recommended Standard) to Magenta (Recommended Practice). Through the process of normal evolution, it is expected that expansion, deletion, or modification of this document may occur. This Recommended Practice is therefore subject to CCSDS document management and change control procedures, which are defined in the Procedures Manual for the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems. Current issue updates document based on input from user community (note). Current versions of CCSDS documents are maintained at the CCSDS Web site:
The Digital Squeeze: Libraries at the Crossroads: the Library Resource Guide Benchmark Study on 2012 Library Spending Plans
Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
The second annual benchmark study of library spending plans from Library Resource Guide explores the wide range of spending and priorities decision-making taking place in 2012 budgets for public, academic and special libraries. Includes year-to-year comparative data. Learn where peer institutions are focusing their scarce investments, based on a study of over 700 participating North American institutions.
The Digital Public Domain: Foundations for an Open Culture
Digital technology has made culture more accessible than ever before. Texts, audio, pictures and video can easily be produced, disseminated, used and remixed using devices that are increasingly user-friendly and affordable. However, along with this technological democratization comes a paradoxical flipside: the norms regulating culture's use — copyright and related rights — have become increasingly restrictive. This book brings together essays by academics, librarians, entrepreneurs, activists and policy makers, who were all part of the EU-funded Communia project. Together the authors argue that the Public Domain — that is, the informational works owned by all of us, be that literature, music, the output of scientific research, educational material or public sector information — is fundamental to a healthy society. The essays range from more theoretical papers on the history of copyright and the Public Domain, to practical examples and case studies of recent projects that have engaged with the principles of Open Access and Creative Commons licensing.