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Social Circumstance and Aesthetic Achievement: Contextual Studies in Richard Wright’s Native Son
This collection of essays on Richard Wright’s Native Son developed from a research-oriented, upper- division University of North Texas Honors College course, spring 2015. It contains the following seven chapters: Chapter I: The Cognitive Dissonance of Bigger Thomas (by Rachel Martinez) Chapter II: The Equal of Them: Violence and Equality in Native Son and “The Man Who Was Almost a Man” (by Molly Riddell) Chapter III: Above the Sceptered Sway: Holy Justice, and the Trials of Bigger and Shylock (by Alberto Puras) Chapter IV: Through His Eyes: Critical Analysis of Wright’s Native Son and Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment (by Rachel Torres) Chapter V: Perceptual Misadventure: Becoming Rather than Enacting the Stereotype in Wright’s Native Son and Melville’s “Benito Cereno” (by Stormie Garza) Chapter VI: Psychologically Rather than Physically Dismembered: Reconsideration of Self-conception in Native Son and Moby-Dick (by Yacine Ndiaye) Chapter VII: Specious Dialectic in Wright’s Native Son (by Nicholas Grotowski). The student authors have exhibited burgeoning skills as historical contextualists, mindful of the author’s times, social circumstance, personal reading, narrative point of view, and aesthetic achievement, evidenced by six of these essays having been accepted for presentation at the annual conference of the American Studies Association of Texas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc854116/
"Independent Original and Progressive": Celebrating 125 Years of UNT
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Joshua C. Chilton first described UNT as “independent, original and progressive” in his inaugural speech opening the university in 1890. In the 125 years since then the university has more than lived up to his expectations. The University Archive holds countless photographs, artifacts and publications which tell the remarkable story of UNT from its beginnings in a downtown hardware store to its place today as the one of the nation’s largest public universities. This book features stories about the people and events that helped to define the character and spirit of UNT. Each story is illustrated with photographs and artifacts specially chosen from the Special Collections department and the Music Library, both part of the UNT Libraries, whose staff are proud to share these wonderful memories with you.​ digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc850080/
The UNT Music Library at 75: Selections from Its Special Collections
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The UNT Music Library boasts an interesting and vastly varied assortment of musical treasures in its special collections. This commemorative volume celebrates its 75th anniversary with a brief history of the Music Library and a selection of items from its unique collections. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc850081/
University of North Texas System Strategic Plan: 2012-2016
Strategic plan for the University of North Texas (UNT) System outlining the organization's vision, mission, and values, as well as specific, five-year goals for each of the system's campuses: the main Denton campus, UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth, and UNT Dallas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc848793/
Web Archiving Environmental Scan
Environmental scan of Web archiving activities at university libraries around the United States. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc806267/
Through the Lenses of Ray Bankston and Don Shugart: Horse Photos from the University of North Texas Libraries
The selected Horse Photos in this book represent samples images produced by the two most prolific equine photographers, Ray Bankston and Don Shugart between 1962 and 2000. While Ray Bankston and Don Shugart traveled extensively, many of their clients, including prominent ranches and prestigious performance horse events, were located in Texas, home of the American Quarter Horse Association, the National Cutting Horse Association, and the American Paint Horse Association. In addition to formal portraits of famous horses and their owners and riders, their photo collections also contain never-before-published informal shots of riders and horse-show exhibitors, as well as those of farms, ranches, rodeo arenas, and performance rings of a bygone era. Where available, the dates when horses were photographed are noted, as well as the names of their owners, riders, trainers, and the ranches and farms that represent them. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc802019/
The Ursulines in Louisiana: 1727-1824
Book describing the early history of New Orleans and the Ursuline order's presence there. Notable figures from the order are discussed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799662/
Kriegsgeschichtliche Einzelschriften, Issue 6
Book containing two German war histories. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799682/
[Charter of the Sons of the American Revolution Corpus Christi Chapter Number 14]
Charter certifying as official the Corpus Christi Chapter Number 14 of the Sons of the American Revolution society. A golden seal is attached to the lower left of the document. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799659/
Kriegsgeschichtliche Einzelschriften, Issue 5
Book containing two German war histories. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799704/
Office of Scholarly Communication: Scope, Organizational Placement, and Planning in Ten Research Libraries
The phrase “scholarly communication” appears often in the description of library roles and responsibilities, but the function is still new enough that it takes different forms in different institutions. There is no common understanding of where it fits into the library’s organizational structure. This landscape review of offices of scholarly communication grows out of research originally conducted by Ithaka S+R for the Harvard Library. The project was designed to undertake a review of how academic institutions support the scholarly communication function in their libraries and to gather basic information about the issues at some of the largest research intensive university libraries. It finds categorical differences in the vision for the scholarly communications unit and its organizational placement, as well as associated differences in staffing and budget. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799758/
Pictorial Landscape-Photography
Book containing discussions of photographic analysis and techniques. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799744/
Something About Marybell...
Children's book about a young girl with a tail and her adventures with a winged cat. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799691/
Victorian Photographs of Famous Men & Fair Women
Book containing a series of photographs of famous individuals from Great Britain in the nineteenth century. Includes biographical information about the photographer. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799641/
Freedom from Hunger: An Achievable Goal for the United States of America
To identify solutions to hunger, Congress created the bipartisan National Commission on Hunger “to provide policy recommendations to Congress and the USDA Secretary to more effectively use existing programs and funds of the Department of Agriculture to combat domestic hunger and food insecurity.” This report is based on the commission members’ full agreement that hunger cannot be solved by food alone, nor by government efforts alone. The solutions to hunger require a stronger economy, robust community engagement, corporate partnerships, and greater personal responsibility, as well as strong government programs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799756/
Apunte Histórico de los Chinos en Cuba
Book describing the history of Chinese people living in Cuba. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799734/
Emulation & Virtualization as Preservation Strategies
Between the two fundamental digital preservation strategies, migration has been strongly favored. Recent developments in emulation frameworks make it possible to deliver emulations to readers via the Web in ways that make them appear as normal components of Web pages. This removes what was the major barrier to deployment of emulation as a preservation strategy. Barriers remain, the two most important are that the tools for creating preserved system images are inadequate, and that the legal basis for delivering emulations is unclear, and where it is clear it is highly restrictive. Both of these raise the cost of building and providing access to a substantial, well curated collection of emulated digital artefacts beyond reach. This book advocates that if the above mentioned barriers can be addressed, emulation will play a much greater role in digital preservation in the coming years. It will provide access to artefacts that migration cannot, and even assist in migration where necessary by allowing the original software to perform it. The evolution of digital artefacts means that current artefacts are more difficult and expensive to collect and preserve than those from the past, and less suitable for migration. This trend is expected to continue. Emulation is not a panacea. Technical, scale and intellectual property difficulties make many current digital artefacts infeasible to emulate. Where feasible, even with better tools and a viable legal framework, emulation is more expensive than migration-based strategies. The most important reason for the failure of current strategies to collect and preserve the majority of their target material is economic; the resources available are inadequate. The bulk of the resources expended on both migration and emulation strategies are for ingest, especially metadata generation and quality assurance. There is a risk that diverting resources to emulation, with its higher per-artefact ingest cost, will exacerbate the lack of resources. Areas requiring further work if emulation is to achieve its potential as a preservation strategy include: • Standardization of the format of preserved system images, the way they are obtained by emulators, and the means by which emulations of them are exposed to readers. This would enable interoperability between emulation components, aiding contributions and support from the open-source community. • Improvements to the tools for associating technical metadata with preserved software to enable it to be emulated, and the technical metadata databases upon which they depend. This would reduce the cost of preserved system images. • Clarification, and if possible relaxation, of the legal constraints on the creation and provision of access to collections of preserved system images. This would encourage institutions to collect software. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799755/
Repository Planning Checklist and Guidance
This document introduces the Planning Tool for Trusted Electronic Repositories (PLATTER) toolkit which assists repositories in setting the necessary objectives and targets for achieving trustworthiness. PLATTER is not in itself an audit or certification tool but is rather designed to complement existing audit and certification tools by providing a framework which will allow new repositories to incorporate the goal of achieving trust into their planning from an early stage. A repository planned using PLATTER will find itself in a strong position when it subsequently comes to apply one of the existing auditing tools to confirm the adequacy of its procedures for maintaining the long term usability of and access to its material. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799759/
American Place: The Historic American Buildings Survey at Seventy-five Years
This book is an exhibition of historic and current photographs and drawings of sixty-one American buildings that represent fading currents in American society, recognizing the 75th anniversary of the HABS (Historic American Buildings Survey). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799757/
From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan: General Curtis E. LeMay's Letters to His Wife Helen, 1941–1945
In 1942, Colonel Curtis E. LeMay and his 305th Bomb Group left Syracuse, New York, bound for England, where they joined the Eighth Air Force and Royal Air Force in war against Germany and her allies. Over the next three years LeMay led American air forces in Europe, India, China, and the Pacific against the Axis powers. His efforts yielded advancement through the chain of command to the rank of Major General in command of the XXIst Bomber Command, the most effective strategic bombing force of the war. LeMay’s activities in World War II are well-documented, but his personal history is less thoroughly recorded. Throughout the war he wrote hundreds of letters to his wife, Helen, and daughter, Jane. They are published for the first time in this volume, weaved together with meticulously researched narrative essays buttressed by both official and unofficial sources and supplemented with extensive footnotes. History remembers “LeMay, the Commander” well. From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan, will yield a better understanding of “LeMay, the Man.” digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701419/
Six-Shooters and Shifting Sands: The Wild West Life of Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones
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Many well-read students, historians, and loyal aficionados of Texas Ranger lore know the name of Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones (1856-1893), who died on the Texas-Mexico border in a shootout with Mexican rustlers. In Six-Shooters and Shifting Sands, Bob Alexander has now penned the first full-length biography of this important nineteenth-century Texas Ranger. At an early age Frank Jones, a native Texan, would become a Frontier Battalion era Ranger. His enlistment with the Rangers coincided with their transition from Indian fighters to lawmen. While serving in the Frontier Battalion officers' corps of Company D, Frank Jones supervised three of the four “great” captains of that era: J.A. Brooks, John H. Rogers, and John R. Hughes. Besides Austin Ira Aten and his younger brothers Calvin Grant Aten and Edwin Dunlap Aten, Captain Jones also managed law enforcement activities of numerous other noteworthy Rangers, such as Philip Cuney "P.C." Baird, Benjamin Dennis Lindsey, Bazzell Lamar "Baz" Outlaw, J. Walter Durbin, Jim King, Frank Schmid, and Charley Fusselman, to name just a few. Frank Jones’ law enforcing life was anything but boring. Not only would he find himself dodging bullets and returning fire, but those Rangers under his supervision would also experience gunplay. Of all the Texas Ranger companies, Company D contributed the highest number of on-duty deaths within Texas Ranger ranks. The contents include: "Dragged to the ground lanced and scalped" -- "Beneath the heel of an indignant legislature" -- "We fought under the black flag" -- "Several shots and run him into the river" -- "Sworn enemy to Rangers and sheriffs" -- "Sixty thousand dollars to spend" -- "Most bold, high-handed murder" -- "Damnable act of savagery" -- "He caught for a pistol" -- "A strong undercurrent of excitement" -- "By God, they will never come back" -- "Just plain legal assassination" -- "The shooting was promiscuous and lively" -- "We have been compelled to do some killing" -- "Boys, I am killed". digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701513/
The Evolving Scholarly Record
The scholarly record is evolving into a corpus of material vastly different from its previous print-based version. While in the past the scholarly record was largely defined by the formally published monographic and journal literatures, its boundaries are now both expanding and blurring, driven by changes in research practices, as well as changing perceptions of the long-term value of certain forms of scholarly materials. Understanding the nature, scope, and evolutionary trends of the scholarly record is an important concern in many quarters—for libraries, for publishers, for funders, and of course for scholars themselves. This report presents a framework to help organize and drive discussions about the evolving scholarly record. The framework provides a high-level view of the categories of material the scholarly record potentially encompasses, as well as the key stakeholder roles associated with the creation, management, and use of the scholarly record. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701347/
Mapping the Future of Scholarly Publishing
The National Science Communication Institute (nSCI) hosted a conference in late 2013 to explore the broad issue related to scholarly publishing. The Open Science Initiative (OSI) is a working group convened by the National Science Communication Institute (nSCI) in October 2014 to discuss the issues regarding improving open access for the betterment of science and to recommend possible solutions. The following document summarizes the wide range of issues, perspectives and recommendations from this group’s online conversation during November and December 2014 and January 2015. The 112 participants who signed up to participate in this conversation were drawn mostly from the academic, research, and library communities. Most of these 112 were not active in this conversation, but a healthy diversity of key perspectives was still represented. Individual participants may not agree with all of the viewpoints described herein, but participants agree that this document reflects the spirit and content of the conversation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701350/
National Digital Newspaper Program: Impact Study 2004 – 2014
During the summer of 2014, the Division of Preservation and Access sought to evaluate the impact of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) since its beginnings in 2004. Information about the program was obtained through interviews of project directors, performance reports from the awardees, and a survey of NDNP participants developed by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress. Reports from the state partners on their projects were analyzed and examined the ways in which Chronicling America resources are being used. This document summarizes the results of the investigations and demonstrates the impact of NDNP through a constellation of examples. Among other things, the impact study identifies several projects that are taking advantage of this massive, centralized resource as scholars experiment with data mining tools for humanities research. The report concludes in summarizing many project directors' view in saying that the benefits of the National Digital Newspaper Program far surpassed anything anyone could have imagined when the program was launched a decade ago. In sum, NDNP stands as a fine example of what a federal agencies working collaboratively with state partners can achieve. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701336/
Roadside Crosses in Contemporary Memorial Culture
In this study of roadside crosses, the first of its kind, Holly Everett presents the history of these unique commemoratives and their relationship to contemporary memorial culture. The meaning of these markers is presented in the words of grieving parents, high school students, public officials, and private individuals whom the author interviewed during her fieldwork in Texas. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701352/
Near-Death Experiences While Drowning: Dying Is Not the End of Consciousness!
Due to advances in resuscitation and defibrillation practices over the past decades, people are returning from the brink of death in numbers unprecedented in human history. Of the millions of people who survive drowning each year, about 20% report a near-death experience (NDE): a reported memory of profound psychological events that contain certain paranormal, transcendental, and mystical features. NDEs are usually hyperreal and lucid experiences dominated by pleasurable feelings and more rarely dominated by distressed feelings. This book presents a summary of 40 years of research on NDEs. It contains 22 drowning NDE accounts and recommendations for how water safety professionals can use NDE-related information in their work with people they successfully resuscitate. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701339/
Report on the Maturity of the Library’s System Development Life Cycle Processes and Procedures
The System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) process applies to information system development projects ensuring that all functional and user requirements are met by using a structured and standardized process during all phases of a system’s life cycle. Systems developed according to information technology (IT) best practices are more likely to provide secure and reliable long‐term performance. The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) engaged CliftonLarsonAllen’s (CLA’s) to perform an audit of the Library’s SDLC process to assess the maturity of the Library’s current policies and practices and to evaluate the efficiency of Information Technology Services’ (ITS) process for structuring, planning, and controlling the development of the Library’s vital information systems. This included an assessment of ITS’ compliance with the Library’s SDLC policy and the application of generally accepted IT best practices. In its report, CLA identified several weaknesses in the Library’s SDLC process that places the Library at risk of developing IT systems that are not adequately documented and lack cost and performance data needed to properly monitor and make prudent IT investment decisions. By optimizing its current SDLC process, the Library can mitigate these risks while improving efficiency and governance of IT system development. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701335/
Fast Lane to Python: A Quick, Sensible Route to the Joys of Python Coding
This book aims to enable the reader to quickly acquire a Python foundation. The material particularly feel quite comfortable to anyone with background in an object-oriented programming (OOP) language such as C++ or Java. Even if ones lack this background, they will still be able to read these sections, but will probably need to go through them more slowly than those who do know OOP. Some Linux knowledge would also be helpful, but it certainly is not required. Python is used on Windows and Macintosh platforms too, not just Linux. So, most statements here made for the Linux context will also apply to Macs as well. The author acknowledged that programming is a personal, creative activity, so everyone has his/her own view. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701349/
Common Ground: Exploring Compatibilities Between the Linked Data Models of the Library of Congress and OCLC
Since 2011, OCLC researchers have been experimenting with Schema.org as a vehicle for exposing library metadata to Web search engines in a format they seek and understand. Schema.org is sponsored by Bing, Google, Yahoo! and Yandex as a common vocabulary for creating structured data markup on Web pages. OCLC’s experiments led to the 2012 publication of Schema.org metadata elements expressed as linked data on 300 million catalog records accessible from WorldCat.org.1 In 2011, BIBFRAME was launched by the Library of Congress (LC) as an initiative to develop a linked data alternative to MARC, building on the Library’s experience providing linked data access to its authority files. In the past year and a half, OCLC has focused on the tasks related to the use of Schema.org: refining the technical infrastructure and data architecture for at-scale publication of linked data for library resources in the broader Web, and investigating the promise of Schema.org as a common ground between the language of the information-seeking public and professional stewards of bibliographic description. BIBFRAME has focused on publishing additional vocabulary and facilitating implementation and testing. These new developments prompt the need to re-examine the relationship between the LC and OCLC models for library linked data. This document is an executive summary of a more detailed technical analysis that will be released later this year. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701351/
A Framework of Guidance for Building Good Digital Collections, 3rd Edition
The NISO Framework Working Group with support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services has released the third edition of A Framework of Guidance for Building Good Digital Collections. his Framework of Guidance for Building Good Digital Collections has three purposes: To provide an overview of some of the major components and activities involved in creating good digital collections. To identify existing resources that support the development of sound local practices for creating and managing good digital collections. To encourage community participation in the ongoing development of best practices for digital collection building. Each section sets out a set of principles with supporting documentation/resources. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701334/
Library of Congress: Strong Leadership Needed to Address Serious Information Technology Management Weaknesses
The Library of Congress has established policies and procedures for managing its information technology (IT) resources, but significant weaknesses across several areas have hindered their effectiveness: -Strategic planning: The Library does not have an IT strategic plan that is aligned with the overall agency strategic plan and establishes goals, measures, and strategies. This leaves the Library without a clear direction for its use of IT. -Investment management: Although the Library obligated at least $119 million on IT for fiscal year 2014, it is not effectively managing its investments. To its credit, the Library has established structures for managing IT investments—including a review board and a process for selecting investments. However, the board does not review all key investments, and its roles and responsibilities are not always clearly defined. Additionally, the Library does not have a complete process for tracking its IT spending or an accurate inventory of its assets. For example, while the inventory identifies over 18,000 computers currently in use, officials stated that the Library has fewer than 6,500. Until the Library addresses these weaknesses, its ability to make informed decisions will be impaired. -Information security and privacy: The Library assigned roles and responsibilities and developed policies and procedures for securing its information and systems. However, its implementation of key security and privacy management controls was uneven. For example, the Library's system inventory did not include all key systems. Additionally, the Library did not always fully define and test security controls for its systems, remediate weaknesses in a timely manner, and assess the risks to the privacy of personal information in its systems. Such deficiencies also contributed to weaknesses in technical security controls, putting the Library's systems and information at risk of compromise. -Service management: The Library's Information Technology Services (ITS) division is primarily responsible for providing IT services to the agency's operating units. While ITS has catalogued these services, it has not fully developed agreements with the other units specifying expected levels of performance. Further, the other units were often not satisfied with these services, which has contributed to them independently pursuing their own IT activities. This in turn has resulted in units purchasing unnecessary hardware and software, maintaining separate e-mail environments, and managing overlapping or duplicative IT activities. -Leadership: The Library does not have the leadership needed to address these IT management weaknesses. For example, the agency's chief information officer (CIO) position does not have adequate authority over or oversight of the Library's IT. Additionally, the Library has not had a permanent CIO since 2012 and has had five temporary CIOs in the interim. In January 2015, at the conclusion of GAO's review, officials stated that that the Library plans to draft an IT strategic plan within 90 days and hire a permanent CIO. If it follows through on these plans, the Library will be in a stronger position to address its IT management weaknesses and more effectively support its mission. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701344/
Taking Stock: Sharing Responsibility for Print Preservation
In "Taking Stock: Sharing Responsibility for Print Preservation," Roger Schonfeld surveys the progress made in the past decade, and warns against the conflation of collaborative print management and improved access to collections with preservation. This issue brief was presented at Preserving America's Print Resources II: A North American Summit in Berkeley, California, on June 25, 2015. The full conference program is available at http://www.crl.edu/events/preserving-americas-print-resources-ii-north-american-summit. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc701353/
3 Rs of RDA: A Review and Refresher on RDA for Audiovisual Materials
Presentation for the 2015 Church and Synagogue Library Association Conference. This presentation discusses the three Rs of RDA and a review and refresher on RDA for audiovisual materials. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc699836/
Content, Media, Carrier Types for Sound and Moving Image Resources
Handout accompanying a presentation for the 2015 Church and Synagogue Library Association Conference. This handout discusses content, media, carrier types for sound and moving image resources. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc699802/
Holy Spirit Episcopal School: A Bilingual School in Tela, Atlántida, Honduras, of Holy Spirit Episcopal Church/ Iglesia Episcopal Espíritu Santo, a Ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of Honduras
Presentation for the 2015 Church and Synagogue Library Association Conference. This presentation discusses Holy Spirit Episcopal School, a bilingual school in Tela, Atlántida, Honduras. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc699765/
[North Texas State Teachers College: The Eagle's Nest, Campus Map, 1927]
The map titled "The Eagle's Nest" shows a basic view of the main campus in North Texas State Teachers College. It is purely in black and white, with each street and building provided its given name. No legend is assigned. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673736/
[University of North Texas: Campus Map, Parking Map, 2014-2015]
The map here displays where there is on-campus parking at the University of North Texas, for 2014-2015. There are two pages to this map piece. On the upper left corner of the map is the UNT logo in green, black, and white. It states, "University of North Texas: A green light to greatness." Found on the mid-left is a gray compass pointing north, for reference. Streets are marked gray and parking locations are color coded, based on parking permissions (e.g., reserved parking is color coded green). A map key is provided on the mid-right, which also covers parking garages, meter parking, planned construction, bicycle racks, crosswalks, emergency phone locations, ADA ('handicapped') parking, and more. Next to the map legend, on the left side, is information on the speed limit, a sign encouraging people to "share the road," and the UNT Smoke-Free logo. Below the map legend is the contact information for the Parking & Transportation Services and the UNT Police Department. Located on the second page is a mini-map of the UNT Discovery Park (upper left corner), Mean Green Village, and the Apogee Stadium (both on the lower right corner). Information on visitor parking is provided on the right side of the Discovery Park mini-map, while information to purchase it can be found on the lower left corner of the page. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673735/
[University of North Texas: Campus Map, 2004]
This is a map of the University of North Texas, dating back to approximately 2004. On the first page is the map itself, which includes information on the campus speed limit, a mini-map of the UNT Research Park on the upper left corner, and a compass on the mid-left corner for reference. Numbers are assigned to buildings for the legend on the next page. The legend includes both an alphabetical and numerical listing of campus buildings. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673731/
[University of North Texas: Spring 1994, Campus Map]
This is a black and white map of the University of North Texas, dating back to at least 1994. The map covers campus buildings and streets. Numbers are assigned to the building and a legend is provided beneath the map. On the lower left corner of the next page is "Spring," indicating this map was distributed during the spring term. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673716/
[University of North Texas: Campus Map, 2014/15]
Campus map of the University of North Texas, for 2014-2015. Bodies of water are marked with blue while streets are gray. Words are either green or black in color. Numbers are marked above while letters mark the left side. There is a compass pointing north printed in the mid-left section of the map for reference, while a mini-map of the Discovery Park is provided on the upper left corner. On the very right is the legend, titled, "Map Index." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673739/
[University of North Texas: Summer 1999, Campus Map]
This is a black and white map of the University of North Texas, dating back to at least 1999. The map covers campus buildings and streets. Numbers are assigned to the building and a legend is provided beneath the map. On the lower left corner of the next page is "Summer," indicating this map was distributed during the summer term. Printed on the upper left corner of the page is a compass for reference. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673728/
[North Texas State University: Campus Map, Denton, Texas, 1972/73]
There are two pages to this map of North Texas State University, dating back to the campus during the 1972-1973 school year. On the first page is the title, "North Texas State University," and "Campus Map," respectively. Beneath these is the location, "Denton, Texas." These are all aligned to the right side of the page. On the second page is the map itself, which is completely in black and white print. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673721/
[North Texas State University: Campus Map, 1983]
This map is of the Texas State University campus and goes back as far as 1983. It takes two pages of an appendix. The first page is the map itself, with buildings marked in black and assigned numbers while streets are titled and displayed in gray. On the left side of the map is a printed compass pointing north. A legend is provided on the second page. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673723/
[Bulletin of N.T.S.C, Denton, Texas: Student Handbook 1959/60, Campus Map]
The image provided here is the campus map of North Texas State College, for the 1959-1960 school year. This map is inked in green, black, and white, with the map itself in green and white. The title and subtitle, respectively "Bulletin of North Texas State College, Denton, Texas" and "Student Handbook 1959-1960," are printed in black. On the lower right corner of the page is the map legend, printed in green. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673719/
[Bulletin of N.T.S.U.: Fall 1976, Schedule of Classes, Campus Map]
A campus map for the Fall 1976 semester, designed in blue ink, this item is located in the class schedule book for North Texas State University. Buildings on the map are assigned numbers and a legend is provided on the lower left corner. On the lower right corner is information on the distributor (N.T.S.U.) and semester (Fall 1976). Below the semester are the words, "Schedule of Classes." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673740/
[Bulletin of N.T.S. U.: Schedule of Classes-Spring 1968, Campus Map]
A campus map for the Spring 1968 semester, designed in blue ink, this item is located in the class schedule book for North Texas State University. Buildings on the map are assigned numbers and a legend is provided on the lower left corner. On the lower right corner is information on the distributor (N.T.S.U.) and semester (Spring 1968). Next to the semester are the words, "Schedule of Classes." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673737/
[Map of North Texas State College, 1953]
The image here is a black and white campus map of the North Texas State College, dating back to 1953. On the upper left corner is a framed box with a cartoon of a casual dressed man searching for something. Next to the man is the title of the map. Beneath the title, on the lower right corner, is an inked compass that points north, for reference. All buildings are purely black and have a number assigned to them. Streets are displayed as straight lines. Found on the right of the map is the legend. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc673734/
Denton Fracking Referendum Project
On November 4, 2014 Denton residents voted on a proposition calling for the prohibition of hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking", within the city limits of Denton, Texas. The hydraulic fracturing process involves the use of water, sand and/or chemical additives pumped under high pressure to fracture rock formations and improve the flow of natural gas, oil or other hydrocarbons. This referendum was passed by voters and was the first permanent ban on fracking in the State of Texas. This collection is an effort to document news and viewpoints related to the proposed fracking ban and includes a compilation of web pages crawled in late 2014. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc496147/
Denton Plan 2030
This is the official website for the Denton Plan 2030. Denton Plan 2030 is an effort by the city of Denton, Texas to update its comprehensive plan for the future growth and development of Denton. The Denton Plan involves input from local residents, as well as the Denton City Council's Planning and Zoning Commission and the Denton Planning Department. The site includes information about the contents of the plan, the planning process, how to get involved, local events, press coverage, and contact information. This item includes a compilation of archived webpages crawled on a semiannual basis. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc489968/
Glasstire: Visual Art News and Reviews
This is the official website for Glasstire, an online magazine that covers visual art in Texas and Southern California. Founded in 2001, Glasstire was one of the earliest online art journals in the United States. It is a non-profit publication supported in part by grants from The Houston Endowment, The Brown Foundation, the the National Endowment for the Arts, the Greater Houston Community Foundation, the City of Houston through Houston Arts Alliance, and the Texas Commission for the Arts. It includes articles, news about local art events, videos, and classifieds. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc489970/
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