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From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan: General Curtis E. LeMay's Letters to His Wife Helen, 1941–1945

From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan: General Curtis E. LeMay's Letters to His Wife Helen, 1941–1945

Date: 2015
Creator: Hegi, Benjamin Paul & Hurley, Alfred F.
Description: In 1942, Colonel Curtis E. LeMay and his 305th Bomb Group left Syracuse, New York, bound for England, where they joined the Eighth Air Force and Royal Air Force in war against Germany and her allies. Over the next three years LeMay led American air forces in Europe, India, China, and the Pacific against the Axis powers. His efforts yielded advancement through the chain of command to the rank of Major General in command of the XXIst Bomber Command, the most effective strategic bombing force of the war. LeMay’s activities in World War II are well-documented, but his personal history is less thoroughly recorded. Throughout the war he wrote hundreds of letters to his wife, Helen, and daughter, Jane. They are published for the first time in this volume, weaved together with meticulously researched narrative essays buttressed by both official and unofficial sources and supplemented with extensive footnotes. History remembers “LeMay, the Commander” well. From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan, will yield a better understanding of “LeMay, the Man.”
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Mapping the Future of Scholarly Publishing

Mapping the Future of Scholarly Publishing

Date: January 2015
Creator: The Open Science Initiative (OSI) working group, National Science Communication Institute (nSCI)
Description: The National Science Communication Institute (nSCI) hosted a conference in late 2013 to explore the broad issue related to scholarly publishing. The Open Science Initiative (OSI) is a working group convened by the National Science Communication Institute (nSCI) in October 2014 to discuss the issues regarding improving open access for the betterment of science and to recommend possible solutions. The following document summarizes the wide range of issues, perspectives and recommendations from this group’s online conversation during November and December 2014 and January 2015. The 112 participants who signed up to participate in this conversation were drawn mostly from the academic, research, and library communities. Most of these 112 were not active in this conversation, but a healthy diversity of key perspectives was still represented. Individual participants may not agree with all of the viewpoints described herein, but participants agree that this document reflects the spirit and content of the conversation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Near-Death Experiences While Drowning: Dying Is Not the End of Consciousness!

Near-Death Experiences While Drowning: Dying Is Not the End of Consciousness!

Date: 2015
Creator: Holden, Janice Miner & Avramidis, Stathis
Description: Due to advances in resuscitation and defibrillation practices over the past decades, people are returning from the brink of death in numbers unprecedented in human history. Of the millions of people who survive drowning each year, about 20% report a near-death experience (NDE): a reported memory of profound psychological events that contain certain paranormal, transcendental, and mystical features. NDEs are usually hyperreal and lucid experiences dominated by pleasurable feelings and more rarely dominated by distressed feelings. This book presents a summary of 40 years of research on NDEs. It contains 22 drowning NDE accounts and recommendations for how water safety professionals can use NDE-related information in their work with people they successfully resuscitate.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
ETD Lifecycle Management Tools Manual

ETD Lifecycle Management Tools Manual

Date: September 29, 2014
Creator: Schultz, Matt; Eisenhauer, Stephen & Krabbenhoeft, Nick
Description: The IMLS-funded Lifecycle Management of ETDs project has researched, developed, and/or documented a suite of modular Lifecycle Management Tools for curating electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs). The project targeted the following curation activities: Virus Checking, Format Recognition, Preservation Event Record-Keeping, and Simple ETD & Metadata Submission. This manual describes how to implement Lifecycle Management Tools for those activities. The manual is written for ETD Program Managers. It describes a general rationale and use case for each curation activity mentioned above in the context of an ETD program. While the technical and administrative implementations of ETD programs are diverse, this manual includes generalized recommendations for where and when to deploy the tools in an ETD submission workflow. ETD Program Managers are encouraged to coordinate with the full range of stakeholders (including the graduate schools, libraries, campus IT, and vendors) to adapt tools to their implementation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
National Digital Newspaper Program: Impact Study 2004 – 2014

National Digital Newspaper Program: Impact Study 2004 – 2014

Date: September 2014
Creator: Mears, Jamie
Description: During the summer of 2014, the Division of Preservation and Access sought to evaluate the impact of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) since its beginnings in 2004. Information about the program was obtained through interviews of project directors, performance reports from the awardees, and a survey of NDNP participants developed by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress. Reports from the state partners on their projects were analyzed and examined the ways in which Chronicling America resources are being used. This document summarizes the results of the investigations and demonstrates the impact of NDNP through a constellation of examples. Among other things, the impact study identifies several projects that are taking advantage of this massive, centralized resource as scholars experiment with data mining tools for humanities research. The report concludes in summarizing many project directors' view in saying that the benefits of the National Digital Newspaper Program far surpassed anything anyone could have imagined when the program was launched a decade ago. In sum, NDNP stands as a fine example of what a federal agencies working collaboratively with state partners can achieve.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Intellectual Property: Law & the Information Society—Cases and Materials

Intellectual Property: Law & the Information Society—Cases and Materials

Date: August 2014
Creator: Boyle, James & Jenkins, Jennifer
Description: This book is an introduction to intellectual property law, the set of private legal rights that allows individuals and corporations to control intangible creations and marks—from logos to novels to drug formulae—and the exceptions and limitations that define those rights. It focuses on the three graphmain forms of US federal intellectual property—trademark, copyright and patent—but many of the ideas discussed here apply far beyond those legal areas and far beyond the law of the United States. The book is intended to be a textbook for the basic Intellectual Property class, but because it is an open coursebook, which can be freely edited and customized, it is also suitable for an undergraduate class, or for a business, library studies, communications or other graduate school class. Each chapter contains cases and secondary readings and a set of problems or role-playing exercises involving the material. The problems range from a video of the Napster oral argument to counseling clients about search engines and trademarks, applying the First Amendment to digital rights management and copyright or commenting on the Supreme Court’s new rulings on gene patents.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Sustaining the Digital Humanities : Host Institution Support Beyond the Start-up Period

Sustaining the Digital Humanities : Host Institution Support Beyond the Start-up Period

Date: June 18, 2014
Creator: Maron, Nancy L. & Pickle, Sarah
Description: As more and more scholars experiment with digital methods and with building digital collections, what measures are in place to make sure that the fruits of these labors are kept vital for the long term? Library directors and chief information officers sense that there is interest on the part of faculty, but does this mean they need to invest in a digital humanities center and hire new staff or just reconfigure the people and resources they already have? First and foremost, what does university leadership seek to gain from such an investment? This study seeks to address the fate of digital research resources - whether they be digital collections of scholarly or other materials, portals, encyclopedias, mapping tools, crowdsourced transcription projects, visualization tools, or other original and innovative projects that may be created by professors, library, or IT staff. Such projects have the potential to provide valuable tools and information to an international audience of learners. Without careful planning and execution, however, they can also all too easily slip between the cracks and quickly become obsolete.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Evolving Scholarly Record

The Evolving Scholarly Record

Date: June 2014
Creator: Lavoie, Brian; Childress, Eric; Erway, Ricky; Faniel, Ixchel; Malpas, Constance; Schaffner, Jennifer et al.
Description: The scholarly record is evolving into a corpus of material vastly different from its previous print-based version. While in the past the scholarly record was largely defined by the formally published monographic and journal literatures, its boundaries are now both expanding and blurring, driven by changes in research practices, as well as changing perceptions of the long-term value of certain forms of scholarly materials. Understanding the nature, scope, and evolutionary trends of the scholarly record is an important concern in many quarters—for libraries, for publishers, for funders, and of course for scholars themselves. This report presents a framework to help organize and drive discussions about the evolving scholarly record. The framework provides a high-level view of the categories of material the scholarly record potentially encompasses, as well as the key stakeholder roles associated with the creation, management, and use of the scholarly record.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Comparative Analysis of  Distributed Digital Preservation  (DDP) Systems

Comparative Analysis of Distributed Digital Preservation (DDP) Systems

Date: April 2, 2014
Creator: Schultz, Matt & Skinner, Katherine
Description: The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)-funded Chronicles in Preservation project (http://metaarchive.org/neh/) completed this Comparative Analysis of three Distributed Digital Preservation systems to analyze their underlying technologies and methodologies: -Chronopolis using iRODS (http://chronopolis.sdsc.edu/). -University of North Texas using Coda (http://www.library.unt.edu/). -MetaArchive Cooperative using LOCKSS (http://metaarchive.org/). This Comparative Analysis is not intended to designate any of the Distributed Digital Preservation (DDP) systems as superior or inferior to one another in any of the areas disclosed. On the contrary, digital preservation is often best served by maintaining a variety of solutions, and each of the three DDP systems have partnered actively with one another on several digital preservation initiatives and are learning constantly from one another’s approaches. The Chronicles in Preservation project, and more specifically, this Comparative Analysis, has been undertaken by these three systems in order to test, document, and refine their processes, not in isolation, but as a collaborative effort.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Preservation Health Check: Monitoring Threats to Digital Repository Content

Preservation Health Check: Monitoring Threats to Digital Repository Content

Date: April 2014
Creator: Kool, Wouter; Werf, Titia van der & Lavoie, Brian
Description: The Open Planets Foundation (OPF) has suggested the need for digital preservation repositories to perform periodic “health checks” as a routine part of their preservation activities. In the same way that doctors monitor basic health properties of their patients to spot indications of infirmity, repositories should monitor a set of properties associated with “preservation health” to provide an early warning of potential threats to the ongoing security of the archived digital objects in their care. The Preservation Health Check (PHC) project, undertaken as a joint effort by OPF and OCLC Research, aims to evaluate the usefulness of the preservation metadata created and maintained by operational repositories for assessing basic preservation properties. The PHC project seeks to develop an implementable logic to support preservation health checks of this kind, and to test this logic against the store of preservation metadata maintained by an operational preservation repository. The Bibliothèque Nationale de France has agreed to share their preservation metadata in support of this project. The authors aim is to advance the use of preservation metadata as an evidence base for conducting preservation health checks according to a standardized, widely-applicable protocol. Doing so opens up possibilities for internal or third-party threat assessment services ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries