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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Country: United States
 Collection: General Collection
American Place: The Historic American Buildings Survey at Seventy-five Years

American Place: The Historic American Buildings Survey at Seventy-five Years

Date: 2008
Creator: National Park Service
Description: This book is an exhibition of historic and current photographs and drawings of sixty-one American buildings that represent fading currents in American society, recognizing the 75th anniversary of the HABS (Historic American Buildings Survey).
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The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 3

The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 3

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Date: June 2016
Creator: Reaves, Gayle
Description: This anthology collects the ten winners of the 2014 Best American Newspaper Narrative Writing Contest, run by the Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference. The event is hosted by the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas. The contest honors exemplary narrative work and encourages narrative nonfiction storytelling at newspapers across the United States. First place winner: Dan Barry, “The Boys in the Bunkhouse,” published by The New York Times, exposed thirty years of physical and mental abuse of intellectually disabled men living in an Iowa group home. Second place: Christopher Goffard, “The Favor,” published by the Los Angeles Times, describes the plea bargain sentence of the son of a former California assembly speaker, after the son pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter, and whose prison sentence was later reduced by then-California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Third place: Stephanie McCrummen, “A Father’s Scars,” published by the Washington Post, about a Virginia state senator one year after he was stabbed multiple times by his mentally ill son before the son killed himself. Runners-up include Nathan Bomey, John Gallagher and Mark Stryker, “How Detroit was Reborn” (Detroit Free Press); Monica Hesse, “Love and Fire” (Washington Post); Sarah Schweitzer, “Chasing Bayla” ...
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Booker’s Point

Booker’s Point

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Date: April 2016
Creator: Grumbling, Megan
Description: Bernard A. Booker, wry old Maine codger and unofficial mayor of Ell Pond, is the subject of Booker’s Point, an oral history-inspired portrait-in-verse. Weaving storytelling, natural history, and the poetry of place, the collection evokes the sensibility of rural New England and the pleasures of a good story.
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[Charter of the Sons of the American Revolution Corpus Christi Chapter Number 14]

[Charter of the Sons of the American Revolution Corpus Christi Chapter Number 14]

Date: September 17, 1939
Creator: Sons of the American Revolution
Description: Charter certifying as official the Corpus Christi Chapter Number 14 of the Sons of the American Revolution society. A golden seal is attached to the lower left of the document.
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Combat Chaplain: A Thirty-Year Vietnam Battle

Combat Chaplain: A Thirty-Year Vietnam Battle

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Date: 2001
Creator: Johnson, James D.
Description: Chaplain James D. Johnson broke all the rules to be with his men. He chose to accompany them, unarmed, on their daily combat operations, a decision made against the recommendations of his superiors. During what would be the final days for some, he offered his ministry not from a pulpit but on the battlefields--in hot landing zones and rice paddies, in hospitals, aboard ship, and knee-deep in mud. He even found time for baptisms in the muddy Mekong River. "You've never really lived until you've almost died," writes Johnson, one of the youngest army chaplains at the time. Through his compelling narration, he takes us into the hearts of frightened young boys and the minds of experienced men. In Combat Chaplain, we live for eight and one-half months with Johnson as he serves in the field with a small unit numbering 350 men. The physical price can be counted with numbers--ninety-six killed and over nine hundred wounded. Only those who paid it can understand the spiritual and psychological price, in a war that raised many difficult moral issues. "It placed my soul in the lost and found department for awhile," Johnson writes. Also provided here is an in-depth look at ...
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A Different Face of War: Memories of a Medical Service Corps Officer in Vietnam

A Different Face of War: Memories of a Medical Service Corps Officer in Vietnam

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Date: November 2015
Creator: Van Straten, Jim
Description: Assigned as the senior medical advisor to the Army of the Republic of Vietnam in I Corps, an area close to the DMZ, James G. Van Straten traveled extensively and interacted with military officers and non-commissioned officers, peasant-class farmers, Buddhist bonzes, shopkeepers, scribes, physicians, nurses, the mentally ill, and even political operatives. He sent his wife daily letters from July 1966 through June 1967, describing in impressive detail his experiences, and those letters became the primary source for his memoir. The author is grateful that his wife retained all the letters he wrote to her and their children during the year they were apart. The author describes with great clarity and poignancy the anguish among the survivors when an American cargo plane in bad weather lands short of the Da Nang Air Base runway on Christmas Eve and crashes into a Vietnamese coastal village, killing more than 100 people and destroying their village; the heart-wrenching pleadings of a teenage girl that her shrapnel-ravaged leg not be amputated; and the anger of an American helicopter pilot who made repeated trips into a hot landing zone to evacuate the wounded, only to have the Vietnamese insist that the dead be given a ...
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Ecological Studies of the Hudson River Near Indian Point

Ecological Studies of the Hudson River Near Indian Point

Date: April 1971
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: "The general purpose of [this study is] to determine the ecological responses of the [Hudson] River to various classes of potential pollutants, so that the discharge of waste heat and radionuclides from the Indian Point Power Plant can be evaluated in context with these" (p. 1).
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The Effects of Changes in Hydrostatic Pressure on Some Hudson River Biota: Progress Report for 1974

The Effects of Changes in Hydrostatic Pressure on Some Hudson River Biota: Progress Report for 1974

Date: September 1974
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: This research report represents the findings on a study conducted over the effect of hydrostatic pressure and hydroelectric generators on various types of fish and other aquatic organisms in the Hudson River.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Entrainment by the Indian Point Power Plant on Biota in the Hudson River Estuary, August 1976

Effects of Entrainment by the Indian Point Power Plant on Biota in the Hudson River Estuary, August 1976

Date: August 1976
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: "This report presents the final results of studies conducted at Indian Point during 1973 using the full complement of available striped bass ichthyoplankton data. These procedures were undertaken in order to present data for river and plant comparisons in the proper perspective of time and space" (p. ii).
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Effects of Entrainment by the Indian Point Power Plant on Biota in the Hudson River Estuary, March 1975

Effects of Entrainment by the Indian Point Power Plant on Biota in the Hudson River Estuary, March 1975

Date: March 1975
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: "The data presented in this report represent an analysis of the abundance of four life-history stages of striped bass collected in the Hudson River at Indian Point and the intakes and discharge canal at the Indian Point Power Station" (p. 54).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan: General Curtis E. LeMay's Letters to His Wife Helen, 1941–1945

From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan: General Curtis E. LeMay's Letters to His Wife Helen, 1941–1945

Date: 2015
Creator: Hegi, Benjamin Paul & Hurley, Alfred F.
Description: In 1942, Colonel Curtis E. LeMay and his 305th Bomb Group left Syracuse, New York, bound for England, where they joined the Eighth Air Force and Royal Air Force in war against Germany and her allies. Over the next three years LeMay led American air forces in Europe, India, China, and the Pacific against the Axis powers. His efforts yielded advancement through the chain of command to the rank of Major General in command of the XXIst Bomber Command, the most effective strategic bombing force of the war. LeMay’s activities in World War II are well-documented, but his personal history is less thoroughly recorded. Throughout the war he wrote hundreds of letters to his wife, Helen, and daughter, Jane. They are published for the first time in this volume, weaved together with meticulously researched narrative essays buttressed by both official and unofficial sources and supplemented with extensive footnotes. History remembers “LeMay, the Commander” well. From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan, will yield a better understanding of “LeMay, the Man.”
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A History of Fort Worth in Black & White 165 Years of African-American Life

A History of Fort Worth in Black & White 165 Years of African-American Life

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Date: November 2015
Creator: Selcer, Richard F.
Description: A History of Fort Worth in Black & White fills a long-empty niche on the Fort Worth bookshelf: a scholarly history of the city's black community that starts at the beginning with Ripley Arnold and the early settlers, and comes down to today with our current battles over education, housing, and representation in city affairs. The book's sidebars on some noted and some not-so-noted African Americans make it appealing as a school text as well as a book for the general reader. Using a wealth of primary sources, Richard Selcer dispels several enduring myths, for instance the mistaken belief that Camp Bowie trained only white soldiers, and the spurious claim that Fort Worth managed to avoid the racial violence that plagued other American cities in the twentieth century. Selcer arrives at some surprisingly frank conclusions that will challenge current politically correct notions. "Selcer does a great job of exploring little-known history about the military, education, sports and even some social life and organizations."--Bob Ray Sanders, author of Calvin Littlejohn: Portrait of a Community in Black and White.
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The inside of the cup.

The inside of the cup.

Date: 1913
Creator: Churchill, Winston
Description: An exploration of Christianity set in a large city in the midwestern United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Library of Congress: Strong Leadership Needed to Address Serious Information Technology Management Weaknesses

Library of Congress: Strong Leadership Needed to Address Serious Information Technology Management Weaknesses

Date: March 2015
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office
Description: The Library of Congress has established policies and procedures for managing its information technology (IT) resources, but significant weaknesses across several areas have hindered their effectiveness: -Strategic planning: The Library does not have an IT strategic plan that is aligned with the overall agency strategic plan and establishes goals, measures, and strategies. This leaves the Library without a clear direction for its use of IT. -Investment management: Although the Library obligated at least $119 million on IT for fiscal year 2014, it is not effectively managing its investments. To its credit, the Library has established structures for managing IT investments—including a review board and a process for selecting investments. However, the board does not review all key investments, and its roles and responsibilities are not always clearly defined. Additionally, the Library does not have a complete process for tracking its IT spending or an accurate inventory of its assets. For example, while the inventory identifies over 18,000 computers currently in use, officials stated that the Library has fewer than 6,500. Until the Library addresses these weaknesses, its ability to make informed decisions will be impaired. -Information security and privacy: The Library assigned roles and responsibilities and developed policies and procedures ...
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Mortality of Striped Bass Eggs and Larvae in Nets: A Special Report to Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc.

Mortality of Striped Bass Eggs and Larvae in Nets: A Special Report to Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc.

Date: July 1976
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: This report summarizes the results of studies conducted to determine the net-induced mortality rates of striped bass in the Hudson River. In the study, an experimental flume was constructed to test the "efficacy of devices designed to reduce fish impingement at the Indian Point generating station" (p. 2).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Pictorial Landscape-Photography

Pictorial Landscape-Photography

Date: 1914
Creator: Anderson, Paul, 1880-1956
Description: Book containing discussions of photographic analysis and techniques.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Radioecological Studies of the Hudson River

Radioecological Studies of the Hudson River

Date: 1973
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: "This report summarizes the results of the Hudson River radioecological studies conducted in 1973" (p. 1). The study investigates the behavior of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the Hudson River and the accumulation of natural alpha-emitting radionuclides.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Raza Rising: Chicanos in North Texas

Raza Rising: Chicanos in North Texas

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Date: March 2016
Creator: Gonzales, Richard J.
Description: Based on articles written for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, author Richard J. Gonzales draws on his educational, inner-city and professional life experiences to weave eyewitness testimony into issues facing Chicanos, including economic, health, education, criminal justice, politics, immigration, and cultural issues. Raza Rising offers first-hand observations, supported by well-documented scholarly research, of Chicanos’ growth and subsequent struggles to participate fully in North Texas’ political and economic life. Raza Rising takes the reader to the organization of an immigration reform march, to the actual march with 20,000 people, to a protest demonstration of the City of Farmers Branch’s attempt to prohibit renting to the undocumented immigrant, to the author’s awakening in Chicago on the importance of learning, and to his poignant experience as a guest speaker in a Fort Worth public school classroom.
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Regional Assessment of Water Quality: Trinity River Basin

Regional Assessment of Water Quality: Trinity River Basin

Date: October 1992
Creator: Alan Plummer and Associates, Inc.
Description: The purpose of this study is "to identify significant issues affecting water quality" within the Trinity River watershed, located in the eastern half of Texas, "and to provide sufficient information for the Commission, river authorities, and other local government bodies to take appropriate corrective action necessary to maintain and improve the quality of [the] state's water resources" (p. [1]).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Report on the Maturity of the Library’s System Development Life Cycle Processes and Procedures

Report on the Maturity of the Library’s System Development Life Cycle Processes and Procedures

Date: February 2015
Creator: United States. Library of Congress Office of the Inspector General
Description: The System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) process applies to information system development projects ensuring that all functional and user requirements are met by using a structured and standardized process during all phases of a system’s life cycle. Systems developed according to information technology (IT) best practices are more likely to provide secure and reliable long‐term performance. The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) engaged CliftonLarsonAllen’s (CLA’s) to perform an audit of the Library’s SDLC process to assess the maturity of the Library’s current policies and practices and to evaluate the efficiency of Information Technology Services’ (ITS) process for structuring, planning, and controlling the development of the Library’s vital information systems. This included an assessment of ITS’ compliance with the Library’s SDLC policy and the application of generally accepted IT best practices. In its report, CLA identified several weaknesses in the Library’s SDLC process that places the Library at risk of developing IT systems that are not adequately documented and lack cost and performance data needed to properly monitor and make prudent IT investment decisions. By optimizing its current SDLC process, the Library can mitigate these risks while improving efficiency and governance of IT system development.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Riding for the Lone Star: frontier cavalry and the Texas way of war, 1822-1865

Riding for the Lone Star: frontier cavalry and the Texas way of war, 1822-1865

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Date: February 2016
Creator: Jennings, Nathan A.
Description: The idea of Texas was forged in the crucible of frontier warfare between 1822 and 1865, when Anglo-Americans adapted to mounted combat north of the Rio Grande. This cavalry-centric arena, which had long been the domain of Plains Indians and the Spanish Empire, compelled an adaptive martial tradition that shaped early Lone Star society. Beginning with initial tactical innovation in Spanish Tejas and culminating with massive mobilization for the Civil War, Texas society developed a distinctive way of war defined by armed horsemanship, volunteer militancy, and short-term mobilization as it grappled with both tribal and international opponents. Drawing upon military reports, participants’ memoirs, and government documents, cavalry officer Nathan A. Jennings analyzes the evolution of Texan militarism from tribal clashes of colonial Tejas, territorial wars of the Texas Republic, the Mexican-American War, border conflicts of antebellum Texas, and the cataclysmic Civil War. In each conflict Texan volunteers answered the call to arms with marked enthusiasm for mounted combat. Riding for the Lone Star explores this societal passion—with emphasis on the historic rise of the Texas Rangers—through unflinching examination of territorial competition with Comanches, Mexicans, and Unionists. Even as statesmen Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston emerged as influential strategic leaders, ...
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Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

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Date: August 2016
Creator: Grauer, Michael
Description: Frank Reaugh (1860–1945; pronounced “Ray”) was called “the Dean of Texas artists” for good reason. His pastels documented the wide-open spaces of the West as they were vanishing in the late nineteenth century, and his plein air techniques influenced generations of artists. His students include a “Who’s Who” of twentieth-century Texas painters: Alexandre Hogue, Reveau Bassett, and Lucretia Coke, among others. He was an advocate of painting by observation, and encouraged his students to do the same by organizing legendary sketch trips to West Texas. Reaugh also earned the title of Renaissance man by inventing a portable easel that allowed him to paint in high winds, and developing a formula for pastels, which he marketed. A founder of the Dallas Art Society, which became the Dallas Museum of Art, Reaugh was central to Dallas and Oak Cliff artistic circles for many years until infighting and politics drove him out of fashion. He died isolated and poor in 1945. The last decade has seen a resurgence of interest in Reaugh, through gallery shows, exhibitions, and a recent documentary. Despite his importance and this growing public profile, however, Rounded Up in Glory is the first full-length biography. Michael Grauer argues for Reaugh’s ...
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The Royal Air Force in American Skies: the Seven British Flight Schools in the United States During World War II

The Royal Air Force in American Skies: the Seven British Flight Schools in the United States During World War II

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Date: October 2015
Creator: Killebrew, Tom
Description: By early 1941, Great Britain stood alone against the aerial might of Nazi Germany and was in need of pilots. The Lend-Lease Act allowed for the training of British pilots in the United States and the formation of British Flying Training Schools. These unique schools were owned by American operators, staffed with American civilian instructors, supervised by British Royal Air Force officers, utilized aircraft supplied by the U.S. Army Air Corps, and used the RAF training syllabus. Within these pages, Tom Killebrew provides the first comprehensive history of all seven British Flying Training Schools located in Terrell, Texas; Lancaster, California; Miami, Oklahoma; Mesa, Arizona; Clewiston, Florida; Ponca City, Oklahoma; and Sweetwater, Texas. The British students attended classes and slowly mastered the elements of flight day and night. Some students flushed out, while others were killed during training mishaps and are buried in local cemeteries. Those who finished the course became Royal Air Force pilots. These young British students would also forge a strong and long-lasting bond of friendship with the Americans they came to know.
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Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

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Date: July 2015
Creator: Brusilow, Anshel & Underdahl, Robin
Description: Anshel Brusilow was born in 1928 and raised in Philadelphia by musical Russian Jewish parents in a neighborhood where practicing your instrument was as normal as hanging out the laundry. By the time he was sixteen, he was appearing as soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra. He also met Pierre Monteux at sixteen, when Monteux accepted him into his summer conducting school. Under George Szell, Brusilow was associate concertmaster at the Cleveland Orchestra until Ormandy snatched him away to make him concertmaster in Philadelphia, where he remained from 1959 to 1966. Ormandy and Brusilow had a father-son relationship, but Brusilow could not resist conducting, to Ormandy's great displeasure. By the time he was forty, Brusilow had sold his violin and formed his own chamber orchestra in Philadelphia with more than a hundred performances per year. For three years he was conductor of the Dallas Symphony, until he went on to shape the orchestral programs at Southern Methodist University and the University of North Texas. Brusilow played with or conducted many top-tier classical musicians, and he has opinions about each and every one. He also made many recordings. Co-written with Robin Underdahl, his memoir is a fascinating and unique view of American ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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