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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Country: United States
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Regional Assessment of Water Quality: Trinity River Basin

Regional Assessment of Water Quality: Trinity River Basin

Date: October 1992
Creator: Alan Plummer and Associates, Inc.
Description: The purpose of this study is "to identify significant issues affecting water quality" within the Trinity River watershed, located in the eastern half of Texas, "and to provide sufficient information for the Commission, river authorities, and other local government bodies to take appropriate corrective action necessary to maintain and improve the quality of [the] state's water resources" (p. [1]).
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Whiskey River Ranger: The Old West Life of Baz Outlaw

Whiskey River Ranger: The Old West Life of Baz Outlaw

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Date: April 2016
Creator: Alexander, Bob
Description: Captain Frank Jones, a famed nineteenth-century Texas Ranger, said of his company’s top sergeant, Baz Outlaw (1854-1894), “A man of unusual courage and coolness and in a close place is worth two or three ordinary men.” Another old-time Texas Ranger declared that Baz Outlaw “was one of the worst and most dangerous” because “he never knew what fear was.” But not all thought so highly of him. In Whiskey River Ranger, Bob Alexander tells for the first time the full story of this troubled Texas Ranger and his losing battle with alcoholism. In his career Baz Outlaw wore a badge as a Texas Ranger and also as a Deputy U.S. Marshal. He could be a fearless and crackerjack lawman, as well as an unmanageable manic. Although Baz Outlaw’s badge-wearing career was sometimes heroically creditable, at other times his self-induced nightmarish imbroglios teased and tested Texas Ranger management’s resoluteness. Baz Outlaw’s true-life story is jam-packed with fellows owning well-known names, including Texas Rangers, city marshals, sheriffs, and steely-eyed mean-spirited miscreants. Baz Outlaw’s tale is complete with horseback chases, explosive train robberies, vigilante justice (or injustice), nighttime ambushes and bushwhacking, and episodes of scorching six-shooter finality. Baz met his end in a ...
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Pictorial Landscape-Photography

Pictorial Landscape-Photography

Date: 1914
Creator: Anderson, Paul, 1880-1956
Description: Book containing discussions of photographic analysis and techniques.
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Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

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Date: July 2015
Creator: Brusilow, Anshel & Underdahl, Robin
Description: Anshel Brusilow was born in 1928 and raised in Philadelphia by musical Russian Jewish parents in a neighborhood where practicing your instrument was as normal as hanging out the laundry. By the time he was sixteen, he was appearing as soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra. He also met Pierre Monteux at sixteen, when Monteux accepted him into his summer conducting school. Under George Szell, Brusilow was associate concertmaster at the Cleveland Orchestra until Ormandy snatched him away to make him concertmaster in Philadelphia, where he remained from 1959 to 1966. Ormandy and Brusilow had a father-son relationship, but Brusilow could not resist conducting, to Ormandy's great displeasure. By the time he was forty, Brusilow had sold his violin and formed his own chamber orchestra in Philadelphia with more than a hundred performances per year. For three years he was conductor of the Dallas Symphony, until he went on to shape the orchestral programs at Southern Methodist University and the University of North Texas. Brusilow played with or conducted many top-tier classical musicians, and he has opinions about each and every one. He also made many recordings. Co-written with Robin Underdahl, his memoir is a fascinating and unique view of American ...
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The Ursulines in Louisiana: 1727-1824

The Ursulines in Louisiana: 1727-1824

Date: 1886
Creator: Carroll, Mary Theresa Austin
Description: Book describing the early history of New Orleans and the Ursuline order's presence there. Notable figures from the order are discussed.
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The inside of the cup.

The inside of the cup.

Date: 1913
Creator: Churchill, Winston
Description: An exploration of Christianity set in a large city in the midwestern United States.
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Texan identities: moving beyond myth, memory, and fallacy in Texas history

Texan identities: moving beyond myth, memory, and fallacy in Texas history

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Date: September 2016
Creator: Cummins, Light Townsend & Scheer, Mary L.
Description: Texan Identities rests on the assumption that Texas has distinctive identities that define “what it means to be Texan,” and that these identities flow from myth and memory. What constitutes a Texas identity and how may such change over time? What myths, memories, and fallacies contribute to making a Texas identity? Are all the myths and memories that define Texas identity true or are some of them fallacious? Is there more than one Texas identity? The discussion begins with the idealized narrative and icons revolving around the Texas Revolution, most especially the Alamo. The Texas Rangers in myth and memory are also explored. Other essays expand on traditional and increasingly outdated interpretations of the Anglo-American myth of Texas by considering little known roles played by women, racial minorities, and specific stereotypes such as the cattleman. The contents include: Texan identities / Light Townsend Cummins and Mary L. Scheer -- Line in the sand, lines on the soul / Stephen L. Hardin -- Unequal citizens / Mary L. Scheer -- The Texas Rangers in myth and memory / Jody Edward Ginn -- On becoming Texans / Kay Goldman -- Ethel Tunstall Drought / Light Townsend Cummins -- W. W. Jones of ...
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Raza Rising: Chicanos in North Texas

Raza Rising: Chicanos in North Texas

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Date: March 2016
Creator: Gonzales, Richard J.
Description: Based on articles written for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, author Richard J. Gonzales draws on his educational, inner-city and professional life experiences to weave eyewitness testimony into issues facing Chicanos, including economic, health, education, criminal justice, politics, immigration, and cultural issues. Raza Rising offers first-hand observations, supported by well-documented scholarly research, of Chicanos’ growth and subsequent struggles to participate fully in North Texas’ political and economic life. Raza Rising takes the reader to the organization of an immigration reform march, to the actual march with 20,000 people, to a protest demonstration of the City of Farmers Branch’s attempt to prohibit renting to the undocumented immigrant, to the author’s awakening in Chicago on the importance of learning, and to his poignant experience as a guest speaker in a Fort Worth public school classroom.
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Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

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Date: August 2016
Creator: Grauer, Michael
Description: Frank Reaugh (1860–1945; pronounced “Ray”) was called “the Dean of Texas artists” for good reason. His pastels documented the wide-open spaces of the West as they were vanishing in the late nineteenth century, and his plein air techniques influenced generations of artists. His students include a “Who’s Who” of twentieth-century Texas painters: Alexandre Hogue, Reveau Bassett, and Lucretia Coke, among others. He was an advocate of painting by observation, and encouraged his students to do the same by organizing legendary sketch trips to West Texas. Reaugh also earned the title of Renaissance man by inventing a portable easel that allowed him to paint in high winds, and developing a formula for pastels, which he marketed. A founder of the Dallas Art Society, which became the Dallas Museum of Art, Reaugh was central to Dallas and Oak Cliff artistic circles for many years until infighting and politics drove him out of fashion. He died isolated and poor in 1945. The last decade has seen a resurgence of interest in Reaugh, through gallery shows, exhibitions, and a recent documentary. Despite his importance and this growing public profile, however, Rounded Up in Glory is the first full-length biography. Michael Grauer argues for Reaugh’s ...
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Booker’s Point

Booker’s Point

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Date: April 2016
Creator: Grumbling, Megan
Description: Bernard A. Booker, wry old Maine codger and unofficial mayor of Ell Pond, is the subject of Booker’s Point, an oral history-inspired portrait-in-verse. Weaving storytelling, natural history, and the poetry of place, the collection evokes the sensibility of rural New England and the pleasures of a good story.
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Through the Lenses of Ray Bankston and Don Shugart: Horse Photos from the University of North Texas Libraries

Through the Lenses of Ray Bankston and Don Shugart: Horse Photos from the University of North Texas Libraries

Date: 2015
Creator: Harrison, Sally
Description: The selected Horse Photos in this book represent samples images produced by the two most prolific equine photographers, Ray Bankston and Don Shugart between 1962 and 2000. While Ray Bankston and Don Shugart traveled extensively, many of their clients, including prominent ranches and prestigious performance horse events, were located in Texas, home of the American Quarter Horse Association, the National Cutting Horse Association, and the American Paint Horse Association. In addition to formal portraits of famous horses and their owners and riders, their photo collections also contain never-before-published informal shots of riders and horse-show exhibitors, as well as those of farms, ranches, rodeo arenas, and performance rings of a bygone era. Where available, the dates when horses were photographed are noted, as well as the names of their owners, riders, trainers, and the ranches and farms that represent them.
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From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan: General Curtis E. LeMay's Letters to His Wife Helen, 1941–1945

From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan: General Curtis E. LeMay's Letters to His Wife Helen, 1941–1945

Date: 2015
Creator: Hegi, Benjamin Paul & Hurley, Alfred F.
Description: In 1942, Colonel Curtis E. LeMay and his 305th Bomb Group left Syracuse, New York, bound for England, where they joined the Eighth Air Force and Royal Air Force in war against Germany and her allies. Over the next three years LeMay led American air forces in Europe, India, China, and the Pacific against the Axis powers. His efforts yielded advancement through the chain of command to the rank of Major General in command of the XXIst Bomber Command, the most effective strategic bombing force of the war. LeMay’s activities in World War II are well-documented, but his personal history is less thoroughly recorded. Throughout the war he wrote hundreds of letters to his wife, Helen, and daughter, Jane. They are published for the first time in this volume, weaved together with meticulously researched narrative essays buttressed by both official and unofficial sources and supplemented with extensive footnotes. History remembers “LeMay, the Commander” well. From Wright Field, Ohio, to Hokkaido, Japan, will yield a better understanding of “LeMay, the Man.”
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Riding for the Lone Star: frontier cavalry and the Texas way of war, 1822-1865

Riding for the Lone Star: frontier cavalry and the Texas way of war, 1822-1865

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Date: February 2016
Creator: Jennings, Nathan A.
Description: The idea of Texas was forged in the crucible of frontier warfare between 1822 and 1865, when Anglo-Americans adapted to mounted combat north of the Rio Grande. This cavalry-centric arena, which had long been the domain of Plains Indians and the Spanish Empire, compelled an adaptive martial tradition that shaped early Lone Star society. Beginning with initial tactical innovation in Spanish Tejas and culminating with massive mobilization for the Civil War, Texas society developed a distinctive way of war defined by armed horsemanship, volunteer militancy, and short-term mobilization as it grappled with both tribal and international opponents. Drawing upon military reports, participants’ memoirs, and government documents, cavalry officer Nathan A. Jennings analyzes the evolution of Texan militarism from tribal clashes of colonial Tejas, territorial wars of the Texas Republic, the Mexican-American War, border conflicts of antebellum Texas, and the cataclysmic Civil War. In each conflict Texan volunteers answered the call to arms with marked enthusiasm for mounted combat. Riding for the Lone Star explores this societal passion—with emphasis on the historic rise of the Texas Rangers—through unflinching examination of territorial competition with Comanches, Mexicans, and Unionists. Even as statesmen Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston emerged as influential strategic leaders, ...
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Combat Chaplain: A Thirty-Year Vietnam Battle

Combat Chaplain: A Thirty-Year Vietnam Battle

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Date: 2001
Creator: Johnson, James D.
Description: Chaplain James D. Johnson broke all the rules to be with his men. He chose to accompany them, unarmed, on their daily combat operations, a decision made against the recommendations of his superiors. During what would be the final days for some, he offered his ministry not from a pulpit but on the battlefields--in hot landing zones and rice paddies, in hospitals, aboard ship, and knee-deep in mud. He even found time for baptisms in the muddy Mekong River. "You've never really lived until you've almost died," writes Johnson, one of the youngest army chaplains at the time. Through his compelling narration, he takes us into the hearts of frightened young boys and the minds of experienced men. In Combat Chaplain, we live for eight and one-half months with Johnson as he serves in the field with a small unit numbering 350 men. The physical price can be counted with numbers--ninety-six killed and over nine hundred wounded. Only those who paid it can understand the spiritual and psychological price, in a war that raised many difficult moral issues. "It placed my soul in the lost and found department for awhile," Johnson writes. Also provided here is an in-depth look at ...
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No Hope for Heaven, No Fear of Hell: The Stafford-Townsend Feud of Colorado County, Texas, 1871-1911

No Hope for Heaven, No Fear of Hell: The Stafford-Townsend Feud of Colorado County, Texas, 1871-1911

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Date: September 2016
Creator: Kearney, James C.; Stein, Bill & Smallwood, James
Description: Two family names have come to be associated with the violence that plagued Colorado County, Texas, for decades after the end of the Civil War: the Townsends and the Staffords. Both prominent families amassed wealth and achieved status, but it was their resolve to hold on to both, by whatever means necessary, including extra-legal means, that sparked the feud. Elected office was one of the paths to success, but more important was control of the sheriff’s office, which gave one a decided advantage should the threat of gun violence arise. No Hope for Heaven, No Fear of Hell concentrates on those individual acts of private justice associated with the Stafford and Townsend families. It began with an 1871 shootout in Columbus, followed by the deaths of the Stafford brothers in 1890. The second phase blossomed after 1898 with the assassination of Larkin Hope, and concluded in 1911 with the violent deaths of Marion Hope, Jim Townsend, and Will Clements, all in the space of one month. The contents include: The murders of Bob and John Stafford at the hands of Larkin and Marion Hope -- The seven Townsend brothers (and one sister) of Texas -- Robert Earl Stafford -- The ...
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The Royal Air Force in American Skies: the Seven British Flight Schools in the United States During World War II

The Royal Air Force in American Skies: the Seven British Flight Schools in the United States During World War II

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Date: October 2015
Creator: Killebrew, Tom
Description: By early 1941, Great Britain stood alone against the aerial might of Nazi Germany and was in need of pilots. The Lend-Lease Act allowed for the training of British pilots in the United States and the formation of British Flying Training Schools. These unique schools were owned by American operators, staffed with American civilian instructors, supervised by British Royal Air Force officers, utilized aircraft supplied by the U.S. Army Air Corps, and used the RAF training syllabus. Within these pages, Tom Killebrew provides the first comprehensive history of all seven British Flying Training Schools located in Terrell, Texas; Lancaster, California; Miami, Oklahoma; Mesa, Arizona; Clewiston, Florida; Ponca City, Oklahoma; and Sweetwater, Texas. The British students attended classes and slowly mastered the elements of flight day and night. Some students flushed out, while others were killed during training mishaps and are buried in local cemeteries. Those who finished the course became Royal Air Force pilots. These young British students would also forge a strong and long-lasting bond of friendship with the Americans they came to know.
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Women in Civil War Texas: Diversity and Dissidence in the Trans-Mississippi

Women in Civil War Texas: Diversity and Dissidence in the Trans-Mississippi

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Date: October 2016
Creator: Liles, Deborah M. & Boswell, Angela
Description: Women in Civil War Texas is the first book dedicated to the unique experiences of Texas women during this time. It connects Texas women’s lives to southern women’s history and shares the diversity of experiences of women in Texas during the Civil War. Contributors explore Texas women and their vocal support for secession, coping with their husbands’ wartime absences, the importance of letter-writing, and how pro-Union sentiment caused serious difficulties for women. They also analyze the effects of ethnicity, focusing on African American, German, and Tejana women’s experiences. Finally, two essays examine the problem of refugee women in east Texas and the dangers facing western frontier women. The contents include: "Everyone has the war fever" / Vicki Betts -- Caroline Sedberry, politician's wife / Dorothy Ewing -- He said, she said / Beverly Rowe -- Finding joy through hard times / Brittany Bounds -- Black Texas women and the freedom war / Bruce A. Glasrud -- Black women and Supreme Court decisions during the Civil War era / Linda S. Hudson -- Mexican-Texan women in the Civil War / Jerry Thompson and Elizabeth Mata -- Courage on a Texas frontier / Judith Dykes-Hoffman -- "In favor of our fathers' country ...
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American Place: The Historic American Buildings Survey at Seventy-five Years

American Place: The Historic American Buildings Survey at Seventy-five Years

Date: 2008
Creator: National Park Service
Description: This book is an exhibition of historic and current photographs and drawings of sixty-one American buildings that represent fading currents in American society, recognizing the 75th anniversary of the HABS (Historic American Buildings Survey).
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Ecological Studies of the Hudson River Near Indian Point

Ecological Studies of the Hudson River Near Indian Point

Date: April 1971
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: "The general purpose of [this study is] to determine the ecological responses of the [Hudson] River to various classes of potential pollutants, so that the discharge of waste heat and radionuclides from the Indian Point Power Plant can be evaluated in context with these" (p. 1).
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The Effects of Changes in Hydrostatic Pressure on Some Hudson River Biota: Progress Report for 1974

The Effects of Changes in Hydrostatic Pressure on Some Hudson River Biota: Progress Report for 1974

Date: September 1974
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: This research report represents the findings on a study conducted over the effect of hydrostatic pressure and hydroelectric generators on various types of fish and other aquatic organisms in the Hudson River.
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Effects of Entrainment by the Indian Point Power Plant on Biota in the Hudson River Estuary, August 1976

Effects of Entrainment by the Indian Point Power Plant on Biota in the Hudson River Estuary, August 1976

Date: August 1976
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: "This report presents the final results of studies conducted at Indian Point during 1973 using the full complement of available striped bass ichthyoplankton data. These procedures were undertaken in order to present data for river and plant comparisons in the proper perspective of time and space" (p. ii).
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Effects of Entrainment by the Indian Point Power Plant on Biota in the Hudson River Estuary, March 1975

Effects of Entrainment by the Indian Point Power Plant on Biota in the Hudson River Estuary, March 1975

Date: March 1975
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: "The data presented in this report represent an analysis of the abundance of four life-history stages of striped bass collected in the Hudson River at Indian Point and the intakes and discharge canal at the Indian Point Power Station" (p. 54).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Mortality of Striped Bass Eggs and Larvae in Nets: A Special Report to Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc.

Mortality of Striped Bass Eggs and Larvae in Nets: A Special Report to Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc.

Date: July 1976
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: This report summarizes the results of studies conducted to determine the net-induced mortality rates of striped bass in the Hudson River. In the study, an experimental flume was constructed to test the "efficacy of devices designed to reduce fish impingement at the Indian Point generating station" (p. 2).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Radioecological Studies of the Hudson River

Radioecological Studies of the Hudson River

Date: 1973
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Description: "This report summarizes the results of the Hudson River radioecological studies conducted in 1973" (p. 1). The study investigates the behavior of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the Hudson River and the accumulation of natural alpha-emitting radionuclides.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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