You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Country: United States
 State: Texas
 Collection: General Collection
[Charter of the Sons of the American Revolution Corpus Christi Chapter Number 14]

[Charter of the Sons of the American Revolution Corpus Christi Chapter Number 14]

Date: September 17, 1939
Creator: Sons of the American Revolution
Description: Charter certifying as official the Corpus Christi Chapter Number 14 of the Sons of the American Revolution society. A golden seal is attached to the lower left of the document.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A History of Fort Worth in Black & White 165 Years of African-American Life

A History of Fort Worth in Black & White 165 Years of African-American Life

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: November 2015
Creator: Selcer, Richard F.
Description: A History of Fort Worth in Black & White fills a long-empty niche on the Fort Worth bookshelf: a scholarly history of the city's black community that starts at the beginning with Ripley Arnold and the early settlers, and comes down to today with our current battles over education, housing, and representation in city affairs. The book's sidebars on some noted and some not-so-noted African Americans make it appealing as a school text as well as a book for the general reader. Using a wealth of primary sources, Richard Selcer dispels several enduring myths, for instance the mistaken belief that Camp Bowie trained only white soldiers, and the spurious claim that Fort Worth managed to avoid the racial violence that plagued other American cities in the twentieth century. Selcer arrives at some surprisingly frank conclusions that will challenge current politically correct notions. "Selcer does a great job of exploring little-known history about the military, education, sports and even some social life and organizations."--Bob Ray Sanders, author of Calvin Littlejohn: Portrait of a Community in Black and White.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Raza Rising: Chicanos in North Texas

Raza Rising: Chicanos in North Texas

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: March 2016
Creator: Gonzales, Richard J.
Description: Based on articles written for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, author Richard J. Gonzales draws on his educational, inner-city and professional life experiences to weave eyewitness testimony into issues facing Chicanos, including economic, health, education, criminal justice, politics, immigration, and cultural issues. Raza Rising offers first-hand observations, supported by well-documented scholarly research, of Chicanos’ growth and subsequent struggles to participate fully in North Texas’ political and economic life. Raza Rising takes the reader to the organization of an immigration reform march, to the actual march with 20,000 people, to a protest demonstration of the City of Farmers Branch’s attempt to prohibit renting to the undocumented immigrant, to the author’s awakening in Chicago on the importance of learning, and to his poignant experience as a guest speaker in a Fort Worth public school classroom.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Regional Assessment of Water Quality: Trinity River Basin

Regional Assessment of Water Quality: Trinity River Basin

Date: October 1992
Creator: Alan Plummer and Associates, Inc.
Description: The purpose of this study is "to identify significant issues affecting water quality" within the Trinity River watershed, located in the eastern half of Texas, "and to provide sufficient information for the Commission, river authorities, and other local government bodies to take appropriate corrective action necessary to maintain and improve the quality of [the] state's water resources" (p. [1]).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Riding for the Lone Star: frontier cavalry and the Texas way of war, 1822-1865

Riding for the Lone Star: frontier cavalry and the Texas way of war, 1822-1865

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: February 2016
Creator: Jennings, Nathan A.
Description: The idea of Texas was forged in the crucible of frontier warfare between 1822 and 1865, when Anglo-Americans adapted to mounted combat north of the Rio Grande. This cavalry-centric arena, which had long been the domain of Plains Indians and the Spanish Empire, compelled an adaptive martial tradition that shaped early Lone Star society. Beginning with initial tactical innovation in Spanish Tejas and culminating with massive mobilization for the Civil War, Texas society developed a distinctive way of war defined by armed horsemanship, volunteer militancy, and short-term mobilization as it grappled with both tribal and international opponents. Drawing upon military reports, participants’ memoirs, and government documents, cavalry officer Nathan A. Jennings analyzes the evolution of Texan militarism from tribal clashes of colonial Tejas, territorial wars of the Texas Republic, the Mexican-American War, border conflicts of antebellum Texas, and the cataclysmic Civil War. In each conflict Texan volunteers answered the call to arms with marked enthusiasm for mounted combat. Riding for the Lone Star explores this societal passion—with emphasis on the historic rise of the Texas Rangers—through unflinching examination of territorial competition with Comanches, Mexicans, and Unionists. Even as statesmen Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston emerged as influential strategic leaders, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Grauer, Michael
Description: Frank Reaugh (1860–1945; pronounced “Ray”) was called “the Dean of Texas artists” for good reason. His pastels documented the wide-open spaces of the West as they were vanishing in the late nineteenth century, and his plein air techniques influenced generations of artists. His students include a “Who’s Who” of twentieth-century Texas painters: Alexandre Hogue, Reveau Bassett, and Lucretia Coke, among others. He was an advocate of painting by observation, and encouraged his students to do the same by organizing legendary sketch trips to West Texas. Reaugh also earned the title of Renaissance man by inventing a portable easel that allowed him to paint in high winds, and developing a formula for pastels, which he marketed. A founder of the Dallas Art Society, which became the Dallas Museum of Art, Reaugh was central to Dallas and Oak Cliff artistic circles for many years until infighting and politics drove him out of fashion. He died isolated and poor in 1945. The last decade has seen a resurgence of interest in Reaugh, through gallery shows, exhibitions, and a recent documentary. Despite his importance and this growing public profile, however, Rounded Up in Glory is the first full-length biography. Michael Grauer argues for Reaugh’s ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: July 2015
Creator: Brusilow, Anshel & Underdahl, Robin
Description: Anshel Brusilow was born in 1928 and raised in Philadelphia by musical Russian Jewish parents in a neighborhood where practicing your instrument was as normal as hanging out the laundry. By the time he was sixteen, he was appearing as soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra. He also met Pierre Monteux at sixteen, when Monteux accepted him into his summer conducting school. Under George Szell, Brusilow was associate concertmaster at the Cleveland Orchestra until Ormandy snatched him away to make him concertmaster in Philadelphia, where he remained from 1959 to 1966. Ormandy and Brusilow had a father-son relationship, but Brusilow could not resist conducting, to Ormandy's great displeasure. By the time he was forty, Brusilow had sold his violin and formed his own chamber orchestra in Philadelphia with more than a hundred performances per year. For three years he was conductor of the Dallas Symphony, until he went on to shape the orchestral programs at Southern Methodist University and the University of North Texas. Brusilow played with or conducted many top-tier classical musicians, and he has opinions about each and every one. He also made many recordings. Co-written with Robin Underdahl, his memoir is a fascinating and unique view of American ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Story of North Texas : from Texas Normal College, 1890, to the University of North Texas system, 2001

The Story of North Texas : from Texas Normal College, 1890, to the University of North Texas system, 2001

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 2002
Creator: Rogers, James L.
Description: A history of the institution of the University of North Texas, featuring photographs of people and events on campus and charting its development from the Texas Normal College to its role in the sciences, mathematics, humanities, social sciences and teacher education, amongst others.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Tales of Texas Cooking: Stories and Recipes from the Trans-Pecos to the Piney Woods and High Plains to the Gulf Prairies

Tales of Texas Cooking: Stories and Recipes from the Trans-Pecos to the Piney Woods and High Plains to the Gulf Prairies

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Vick, Frances B.
Description: According to Renaissance woman and Pepper Lady Jean Andrews, although food is eaten as a response to hunger, it is much more than filling one's stomach. It also provides emotional fulfillment. This is borne out by the joy many of us feel as a family when we get in the kitchen and cook together and then share in our labors at the dinner table. Food is comfort, yet it is also political and contested because we often are what we eat--meaning what is available and familiar and allowed. Texas is fortunate in having a bountiful supply of ethnic groups influencing its foodways, and Texas food is the perfect metaphor for the blending of diverse cultures and native resources. Food is a symbol of our success and our communion, and whenever possible, Texans tend to do food in a big way. This latest publication from the Texas Folklore Society contains stories and more than 120 recipes, from long ago and just yesterday, organized by the 10 vegetation regions of the state. Herein you'll find Senator Kay Bailey Hutchinson's Family Cake, memories of beef jerky and sassafras tea from John Erickson of Hank the Cowdog fame, Sam Houston's barbecue sauce, and stories ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
University of North Texas System Strategic Plan: 2012-2016

University of North Texas System Strategic Plan: 2012-2016

Date: 2012
Creator: University of North Texas System
Description: Strategic plan for the University of North Texas (UNT) System outlining the organization's vision, mission, and values, as well as specific, five-year goals for each of the system's campuses: the main Denton campus, UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth, and UNT Dallas.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Whiskey River Ranger: The Old West Life of Baz Outlaw

Whiskey River Ranger: The Old West Life of Baz Outlaw

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: April 2016
Creator: Alexander, Bob
Description: Captain Frank Jones, a famed nineteenth-century Texas Ranger, said of his company’s top sergeant, Baz Outlaw (1854-1894), “A man of unusual courage and coolness and in a close place is worth two or three ordinary men.” Another old-time Texas Ranger declared that Baz Outlaw “was one of the worst and most dangerous” because “he never knew what fear was.” But not all thought so highly of him. In Whiskey River Ranger, Bob Alexander tells for the first time the full story of this troubled Texas Ranger and his losing battle with alcoholism. In his career Baz Outlaw wore a badge as a Texas Ranger and also as a Deputy U.S. Marshal. He could be a fearless and crackerjack lawman, as well as an unmanageable manic. Although Baz Outlaw’s badge-wearing career was sometimes heroically creditable, at other times his self-induced nightmarish imbroglios teased and tested Texas Ranger management’s resoluteness. Baz Outlaw’s true-life story is jam-packed with fellows owning well-known names, including Texas Rangers, city marshals, sheriffs, and steely-eyed mean-spirited miscreants. Baz Outlaw’s tale is complete with horseback chases, explosive train robberies, vigilante justice (or injustice), nighttime ambushes and bushwhacking, and episodes of scorching six-shooter finality. Baz met his end in a ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries