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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Language: English
 Collection: General Collection
Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

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Date: August 2016
Creator: Grauer, Michael
Description: Frank Reaugh (1860–1945; pronounced “Ray”) was called “the Dean of Texas artists” for good reason. His pastels documented the wide-open spaces of the West as they were vanishing in the late nineteenth century, and his plein air techniques influenced generations of artists. His students include a “Who’s Who” of twentieth-century Texas painters: Alexandre Hogue, Reveau Bassett, and Lucretia Coke, among others. He was an advocate of painting by observation, and encouraged his students to do the same by organizing legendary sketch trips to West Texas. Reaugh also earned the title of Renaissance man by inventing a portable easel that allowed him to paint in high winds, and developing a formula for pastels, which he marketed. A founder of the Dallas Art Society, which became the Dallas Museum of Art, Reaugh was central to Dallas and Oak Cliff artistic circles for many years until infighting and politics drove him out of fashion. He died isolated and poor in 1945. The last decade has seen a resurgence of interest in Reaugh, through gallery shows, exhibitions, and a recent documentary. Despite his importance and this growing public profile, however, Rounded Up in Glory is the first full-length biography. Michael Grauer argues for Reaugh’s ...
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The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 3

The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 3

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Date: June 2016
Creator: Reaves, Gayle
Description: This anthology collects the ten winners of the 2014 Best American Newspaper Narrative Writing Contest, run by the Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference. The event is hosted by the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas. The contest honors exemplary narrative work and encourages narrative nonfiction storytelling at newspapers across the United States. First place winner: Dan Barry, “The Boys in the Bunkhouse,” published by The New York Times, exposed thirty years of physical and mental abuse of intellectually disabled men living in an Iowa group home. Second place: Christopher Goffard, “The Favor,” published by the Los Angeles Times, describes the plea bargain sentence of the son of a former California assembly speaker, after the son pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter, and whose prison sentence was later reduced by then-California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Third place: Stephanie McCrummen, “A Father’s Scars,” published by the Washington Post, about a Virginia state senator one year after he was stabbed multiple times by his mentally ill son before the son killed himself. Runners-up include Nathan Bomey, John Gallagher and Mark Stryker, “How Detroit was Reborn” (Detroit Free Press); Monica Hesse, “Love and Fire” (Washington Post); Sarah Schweitzer, “Chasing Bayla” ...
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Social Circumstance and Aesthetic Achievement: Contextual Studies in Richard Wright’s Native Son

Social Circumstance and Aesthetic Achievement: Contextual Studies in Richard Wright’s Native Son

Date: June 2016
Creator: Duban, James
Description: This collection of essays on Richard Wright’s Native Son developed from a research-oriented, upper- division University of North Texas Honors College course, spring 2015. It contains the following seven chapters: Chapter I: The Cognitive Dissonance of Bigger Thomas (by Rachel Martinez) Chapter II: The Equal of Them: Violence and Equality in Native Son and “The Man Who Was Almost a Man” (by Molly Riddell) Chapter III: Above the Sceptered Sway: Holy Justice, and the Trials of Bigger and Shylock (by Alberto Puras) Chapter IV: Through His Eyes: Critical Analysis of Wright’s Native Son and Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment (by Rachel Torres) Chapter V: Perceptual Misadventure: Becoming Rather than Enacting the Stereotype in Wright’s Native Son and Melville’s “Benito Cereno” (by Stormie Garza) Chapter VI: Psychologically Rather than Physically Dismembered: Reconsideration of Self-conception in Native Son and Moby-Dick (by Yacine Ndiaye) Chapter VII: Specious Dialectic in Wright’s Native Son (by Nicholas Grotowski). The student authors have exhibited burgeoning skills as historical contextualists, mindful of the author’s times, social circumstance, personal reading, narrative point of view, and aesthetic achievement, evidenced by six of these essays having been accepted for presentation at the annual conference of the American Studies Association of Texas.
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Booker’s Point

Booker’s Point

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Date: April 2016
Creator: Grumbling, Megan
Description: Bernard A. Booker, wry old Maine codger and unofficial mayor of Ell Pond, is the subject of Booker’s Point, an oral history-inspired portrait-in-verse. Weaving storytelling, natural history, and the poetry of place, the collection evokes the sensibility of rural New England and the pleasures of a good story.
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Whiskey River Ranger: The Old West Life of Baz Outlaw

Whiskey River Ranger: The Old West Life of Baz Outlaw

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Date: April 2016
Creator: Alexander, Bob
Description: Captain Frank Jones, a famed nineteenth-century Texas Ranger, said of his company’s top sergeant, Baz Outlaw (1854-1894), “A man of unusual courage and coolness and in a close place is worth two or three ordinary men.” Another old-time Texas Ranger declared that Baz Outlaw “was one of the worst and most dangerous” because “he never knew what fear was.” But not all thought so highly of him. In Whiskey River Ranger, Bob Alexander tells for the first time the full story of this troubled Texas Ranger and his losing battle with alcoholism. In his career Baz Outlaw wore a badge as a Texas Ranger and also as a Deputy U.S. Marshal. He could be a fearless and crackerjack lawman, as well as an unmanageable manic. Although Baz Outlaw’s badge-wearing career was sometimes heroically creditable, at other times his self-induced nightmarish imbroglios teased and tested Texas Ranger management’s resoluteness. Baz Outlaw’s true-life story is jam-packed with fellows owning well-known names, including Texas Rangers, city marshals, sheriffs, and steely-eyed mean-spirited miscreants. Baz Outlaw’s tale is complete with horseback chases, explosive train robberies, vigilante justice (or injustice), nighttime ambushes and bushwhacking, and episodes of scorching six-shooter finality. Baz met his end in a ...
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Raza Rising: Chicanos in North Texas

Raza Rising: Chicanos in North Texas

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Date: March 2016
Creator: Gonzales, Richard J.
Description: Based on articles written for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, author Richard J. Gonzales draws on his educational, inner-city and professional life experiences to weave eyewitness testimony into issues facing Chicanos, including economic, health, education, criminal justice, politics, immigration, and cultural issues. Raza Rising offers first-hand observations, supported by well-documented scholarly research, of Chicanos’ growth and subsequent struggles to participate fully in North Texas’ political and economic life. Raza Rising takes the reader to the organization of an immigration reform march, to the actual march with 20,000 people, to a protest demonstration of the City of Farmers Branch’s attempt to prohibit renting to the undocumented immigrant, to the author’s awakening in Chicago on the importance of learning, and to his poignant experience as a guest speaker in a Fort Worth public school classroom.
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WASP of the Ferry Command: Women Pilots, Uncommon Deeds

WASP of the Ferry Command: Women Pilots, Uncommon Deeds

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Date: March 2016
Creator: Rickman, Sarah Byrn
Description: WASP of the Ferry Command is the story of the women ferry pilots who flew more than nine million miles in 72 different aircraft—115,000 pilot hours—for the Ferrying Division, Air Transport Command, during World War II. In the spring of 1942, Col. William H. Tunner lacked sufficient male pilots to move vital trainer aircraft from the factory to the training fields. Nancy Love found 28 experienced women pilots who could do the job. They, along with graduates of the Army’s flight training school for women—established by Jacqueline Cochran—performed this duty until fall 1943, when manufacture of trainers ceased. In December 1943 the women ferry pilots went back to school to learn to fly high-performance WWII fighters, known as pursuits. By January 1944 they began delivering high performance P-51s, 47s, and 39s. Prior to D-Day and beyond, P-51s were crucial to the air war over Germany. They had the range to escort B-17s and B-24s from England to Berlin and back on bombing raids that ultimately brought down the German Reich. Getting those pursuits to the docks in New Jersey for shipment abroad became these women’s primary job. Ultimately, more than one hundred WASP pursuit pilots were engaged in this vital ...
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Riding for the Lone Star: frontier cavalry and the Texas way of war, 1822-1865

Riding for the Lone Star: frontier cavalry and the Texas way of war, 1822-1865

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Date: February 2016
Creator: Jennings, Nathan A.
Description: The idea of Texas was forged in the crucible of frontier warfare between 1822 and 1865, when Anglo-Americans adapted to mounted combat north of the Rio Grande. This cavalry-centric arena, which had long been the domain of Plains Indians and the Spanish Empire, compelled an adaptive martial tradition that shaped early Lone Star society. Beginning with initial tactical innovation in Spanish Tejas and culminating with massive mobilization for the Civil War, Texas society developed a distinctive way of war defined by armed horsemanship, volunteer militancy, and short-term mobilization as it grappled with both tribal and international opponents. Drawing upon military reports, participants’ memoirs, and government documents, cavalry officer Nathan A. Jennings analyzes the evolution of Texan militarism from tribal clashes of colonial Tejas, territorial wars of the Texas Republic, the Mexican-American War, border conflicts of antebellum Texas, and the cataclysmic Civil War. In each conflict Texan volunteers answered the call to arms with marked enthusiasm for mounted combat. Riding for the Lone Star explores this societal passion—with emphasis on the historic rise of the Texas Rangers—through unflinching examination of territorial competition with Comanches, Mexicans, and Unionists. Even as statesmen Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston emerged as influential strategic leaders, ...
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"Independent Original and Progressive": Celebrating 125 Years of UNT

"Independent Original and Progressive": Celebrating 125 Years of UNT

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Date: 2016
Creator: Gieringer, Morgan Davis
Description: Joshua C. Chilton first described UNT as “independent, original and progressive” in his inaugural speech opening the university in 1890. In the 125 years since then the university has more than lived up to his expectations. The University Archive holds countless photographs, artifacts and publications which tell the remarkable story of UNT from its beginnings in a downtown hardware store to its place today as the one of the nation’s largest public universities. This book features stories about the people and events that helped to define the character and spirit of UNT. Each story is illustrated with photographs and artifacts specially chosen from the Special Collections department and the Music Library, both part of the UNT Libraries, whose staff are proud to share these wonderful memories with you.​
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The UNT Music Library at 75: Selections from Its Special Collections

The UNT Music Library at 75: Selections from Its Special Collections

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Date: 2016
Creator: McKnight, Mark
Description: The UNT Music Library boasts an interesting and vastly varied assortment of musical treasures in its special collections. This commemorative volume celebrates its 75th anniversary with a brief history of the Music Library and a selection of items from its unique collections.
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Web Archiving Environmental Scan

Web Archiving Environmental Scan

Date: January 2016
Creator: Truman, Gail
Description: Environmental scan of Web archiving activities at university libraries around the United States.
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Against the Grain: Colonel Henry M. Lazelle and the U.S. Army

Against the Grain: Colonel Henry M. Lazelle and the U.S. Army

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Date: December 2015
Creator: Carson, James O.
Description: Henry Martyn Lazelle (1832-1917) was the only cadet in the history of the U.S. Military Academy to be suspended and sent back a year (for poor grades and bad behavior) and eventually return as Commandant of the Corps of Cadets. After graduating from West Point in 1855, he scouted with Kit Carson, was wounded by Apaches, and spent nearly a year as a "paroled" prisoner-of-war at the outbreak of the Civil War. Exchanged for a Confederate officer, he took command of a Union cavalry regiment, chasing Mosby's Rangers throughout northern Virginia. Due in part to an ingrained disposition to question the status quo, Lazelle's service as a commander and senior staff officer was punctuated at times with contention and controversy. In charge of the official records of the Civil War in Washington, he was accused of falsifying records, exonerated, but dismissed short of tour. As Commandant of Cadets at West Point, he was a key figure during the infamous court martial of Johnson Whittaker, one of West Point's first African American cadets. Again, he was relieved of duty after a bureaucratic battle with the Academy's Superintendent.
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Tales of Texas Cooking: Stories and Recipes from the Trans-Pecos to the Piney Woods and High Plains to the Gulf Prairies

Tales of Texas Cooking: Stories and Recipes from the Trans-Pecos to the Piney Woods and High Plains to the Gulf Prairies

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Date: December 2015
Creator: Vick, Frances B.
Description: According to Renaissance woman and Pepper Lady Jean Andrews, although food is eaten as a response to hunger, it is much more than filling one's stomach. It also provides emotional fulfillment. This is borne out by the joy many of us feel as a family when we get in the kitchen and cook together and then share in our labors at the dinner table. Food is comfort, yet it is also political and contested because we often are what we eat--meaning what is available and familiar and allowed. Texas is fortunate in having a bountiful supply of ethnic groups influencing its foodways, and Texas food is the perfect metaphor for the blending of diverse cultures and native resources. Food is a symbol of our success and our communion, and whenever possible, Texans tend to do food in a big way. This latest publication from the Texas Folklore Society contains stories and more than 120 recipes, from long ago and just yesterday, organized by the 10 vegetation regions of the state. Herein you'll find Senator Kay Bailey Hutchinson's Family Cake, memories of beef jerky and sassafras tea from John Erickson of Hank the Cowdog fame, Sam Houston's barbecue sauce, and stories ...
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Office of Scholarly Communication: Scope, Organizational Placement, and Planning in Ten Research Libraries

Office of Scholarly Communication: Scope, Organizational Placement, and Planning in Ten Research Libraries

Date: November 18, 2015
Creator: Ithaka S+R
Description: The phrase “scholarly communication” appears often in the description of library roles and responsibilities, but the function is still new enough that it takes different forms in different institutions. There is no common understanding of where it fits into the library’s organizational structure. This landscape review of offices of scholarly communication grows out of research originally conducted by Ithaka S+R for the Harvard Library. The project was designed to undertake a review of how academic institutions support the scholarly communication function in their libraries and to gather basic information about the issues at some of the largest research intensive university libraries. It finds categorical differences in the vision for the scholarly communications unit and its organizational placement, as well as associated differences in staffing and budget.
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A Different Face of War: Memories of a Medical Service Corps Officer in Vietnam

A Different Face of War: Memories of a Medical Service Corps Officer in Vietnam

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Date: November 2015
Creator: Van Straten, Jim
Description: Assigned as the senior medical advisor to the Army of the Republic of Vietnam in I Corps, an area close to the DMZ, James G. Van Straten traveled extensively and interacted with military officers and non-commissioned officers, peasant-class farmers, Buddhist bonzes, shopkeepers, scribes, physicians, nurses, the mentally ill, and even political operatives. He sent his wife daily letters from July 1966 through June 1967, describing in impressive detail his experiences, and those letters became the primary source for his memoir. The author is grateful that his wife retained all the letters he wrote to her and their children during the year they were apart. The author describes with great clarity and poignancy the anguish among the survivors when an American cargo plane in bad weather lands short of the Da Nang Air Base runway on Christmas Eve and crashes into a Vietnamese coastal village, killing more than 100 people and destroying their village; the heart-wrenching pleadings of a teenage girl that her shrapnel-ravaged leg not be amputated; and the anger of an American helicopter pilot who made repeated trips into a hot landing zone to evacuate the wounded, only to have the Vietnamese insist that the dead be given a ...
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A History of Fort Worth in Black & White 165 Years of African-American Life

A History of Fort Worth in Black & White 165 Years of African-American Life

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Date: November 2015
Creator: Selcer, Richard F.
Description: A History of Fort Worth in Black & White fills a long-empty niche on the Fort Worth bookshelf: a scholarly history of the city's black community that starts at the beginning with Ripley Arnold and the early settlers, and comes down to today with our current battles over education, housing, and representation in city affairs. The book's sidebars on some noted and some not-so-noted African Americans make it appealing as a school text as well as a book for the general reader. Using a wealth of primary sources, Richard Selcer dispels several enduring myths, for instance the mistaken belief that Camp Bowie trained only white soldiers, and the spurious claim that Fort Worth managed to avoid the racial violence that plagued other American cities in the twentieth century. Selcer arrives at some surprisingly frank conclusions that will challenge current politically correct notions. "Selcer does a great job of exploring little-known history about the military, education, sports and even some social life and organizations."--Bob Ray Sanders, author of Calvin Littlejohn: Portrait of a Community in Black and White.
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Last Words of the Holy Ghost

Last Words of the Holy Ghost

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Date: November 2015
Creator: Cashion, Matthew Deshe
Description: Funny, heartbreaking, and real--these twelve stories showcase a dynamic range of voices belonging to characters who can't stop confessing. They are obsessive storytellers, disturbed professors, depressed auctioneers, gambling clergy. A fourteen-year-old boy gets baptized and speaks in tongues to win the love of a girl who ushers him into adulthood; a troubled insomniac searches the woods behind his mother's house for the "awful pretty" singing that begins each midnight; a school-system employee plans a year-end party at the site of a child's drowning; a burned-out health-care administrator retires from New England to coastal Georgia and stumbles upon a life-changing moment inside Walmart. These big-hearted people--tethered to the places that shape them--survive their daily sorrows and absurdities with well-timed laughter; they slouch toward forgiveness, and they point their ears toward the Holy Ghost's last words. "In its precise prose and spooky intelligence and sharp-eyed examination of the condemned kind we are, Last Words of the Holy Ghost is an original. Listen: if you can find a collection of stories more cohesive, more ambitious in reach, more generous in its passion, and fancier in its footwork, I will buy it for you and deliver it in person. In the meantime, put some ...
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The Royal Air Force in American Skies: the Seven British Flight Schools in the United States During World War II

The Royal Air Force in American Skies: the Seven British Flight Schools in the United States During World War II

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Date: October 2015
Creator: Killebrew, Tom
Description: By early 1941, Great Britain stood alone against the aerial might of Nazi Germany and was in need of pilots. The Lend-Lease Act allowed for the training of British pilots in the United States and the formation of British Flying Training Schools. These unique schools were owned by American operators, staffed with American civilian instructors, supervised by British Royal Air Force officers, utilized aircraft supplied by the U.S. Army Air Corps, and used the RAF training syllabus. Within these pages, Tom Killebrew provides the first comprehensive history of all seven British Flying Training Schools located in Terrell, Texas; Lancaster, California; Miami, Oklahoma; Mesa, Arizona; Clewiston, Florida; Ponca City, Oklahoma; and Sweetwater, Texas. The British students attended classes and slowly mastered the elements of flight day and night. Some students flushed out, while others were killed during training mishaps and are buried in local cemeteries. Those who finished the course became Royal Air Force pilots. These young British students would also forge a strong and long-lasting bond of friendship with the Americans they came to know.
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Storming the City: U.S. Military Performance in Urban Warfare from World War II to Vietnam

Storming the City: U.S. Military Performance in Urban Warfare from World War II to Vietnam

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Date: October 2015
Creator: Wahlman, Alec
Description: In an increasingly urbanized world, urban terrain has become a greater factor in military operations. Simultaneously, advances in military technology have given military forces sharply increased capabilities. The conflict comes from how urban terrain can negate or degrade many of those increased capabilities. What happens when advanced weapons are used in a close-range urban fight with an abundance of cover? Storming the City explores these issues by analyzing the performance of the US Army and US Marine Corps in urban combat in four major urban battles of the mid-twentieth century (Aachen 1944, Manila 1945, Seoul 1950, and Hue 1968). Alec Wahlman assesses each battle using a similar framework of capability categories, and separate chapters address urban warfare in American military thought. In the four battles, across a wide range of conditions, American forces were ultimately successful in capturing each city because of two factors: transferable competence and battlefield adaptation. The preparations US forces made for warfare writ large proved generally applicable to urban warfare. Battlefield adaptation, a strong suit of American forces, filled in where those overall preparations for combat needed fine tuning. From World War Two to Vietnam, however, there was a gradual reduction in tactical performance in the ...
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3 Rs of RDA: A Review and Refresher on RDA for Audiovisual Materials

3 Rs of RDA: A Review and Refresher on RDA for Audiovisual Materials

Date: July 30, 2015
Creator: Dutkiewicz, Scott M.
Description: Presentation for the 2015 Church and Synagogue Library Association Conference. This presentation discusses the three Rs of RDA and a review and refresher on RDA for audiovisual materials.
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Content, Media, Carrier Types for Sound and Moving Image Resources

Content, Media, Carrier Types for Sound and Moving Image Resources

Date: July 30, 2015
Creator: Dutkiewicz, Scott M.
Description: Handout accompanying a presentation for the 2015 Church and Synagogue Library Association Conference. This handout discusses content, media, carrier types for sound and moving image resources.
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Holy Spirit Episcopal School: A Bilingual School in Tela, Atlántida, Honduras, of Holy Spirit Episcopal Church/ Iglesia Episcopal Espíritu Santo, a Ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of Honduras

Holy Spirit Episcopal School: A Bilingual School in Tela, Atlántida, Honduras, of Holy Spirit Episcopal Church/ Iglesia Episcopal Espíritu Santo, a Ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of Honduras

Date: July 29, 2015
Creator: Laucher, Bill
Description: Presentation for the 2015 Church and Synagogue Library Association Conference. This presentation discusses Holy Spirit Episcopal School, a bilingual school in Tela, Atlántida, Honduras.
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Taking Stock: Sharing Responsibility for Print Preservation

Taking Stock: Sharing Responsibility for Print Preservation

Date: July 8, 2015
Creator: Schonfeld, Roger C.
Description: In "Taking Stock: Sharing Responsibility for Print Preservation," Roger Schonfeld surveys the progress made in the past decade, and warns against the conflation of collaborative print management and improved access to collections with preservation. This issue brief was presented at Preserving America's Print Resources II: A North American Summit in Berkeley, California, on June 25, 2015. The full conference program is available at http://www.crl.edu/events/preserving-americas-print-resources-ii-north-american-summit.
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Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

Shoot the Conductor: Too Close to Monteux, Szell, and Ormandy

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Date: July 2015
Creator: Brusilow, Anshel & Underdahl, Robin
Description: Anshel Brusilow was born in 1928 and raised in Philadelphia by musical Russian Jewish parents in a neighborhood where practicing your instrument was as normal as hanging out the laundry. By the time he was sixteen, he was appearing as soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra. He also met Pierre Monteux at sixteen, when Monteux accepted him into his summer conducting school. Under George Szell, Brusilow was associate concertmaster at the Cleveland Orchestra until Ormandy snatched him away to make him concertmaster in Philadelphia, where he remained from 1959 to 1966. Ormandy and Brusilow had a father-son relationship, but Brusilow could not resist conducting, to Ormandy's great displeasure. By the time he was forty, Brusilow had sold his violin and formed his own chamber orchestra in Philadelphia with more than a hundred performances per year. For three years he was conductor of the Dallas Symphony, until he went on to shape the orchestral programs at Southern Methodist University and the University of North Texas. Brusilow played with or conducted many top-tier classical musicians, and he has opinions about each and every one. He also made many recordings. Co-written with Robin Underdahl, his memoir is a fascinating and unique view of American ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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