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 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
The Morality and Wit of Congreve and Sheridan in the Comedy of Manners

The Morality and Wit of Congreve and Sheridan in the Comedy of Manners

Date: 1958
Creator: Williams, Samuel Richard
Description: Considering the comedies of the Restoration, and those of Congreve in particular, as the prototype of the comedy of manners and as the model for Sheridan later to revive and emulate, this thesis proposes to point out how the concepts of morality and wit have been a major obstacle to literary critics in analyzing the comedy of manners from its very beginnings, to discuss morality and wit as the basis of a proper evaluation of the comedy of manners both from the standpoint of seventeenth-century precepts and those of a century later, and, finally, to show how, during the early periods in which the comedy of manners flourished,--that of Congreve, 1693-1700; and of Sheridan, 1775-1779--morality and wit were modified and used to suit the divergent sociological and psychological conditions of each period.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Morality in Three of the Later Novels of Henry James

Morality in Three of the Later Novels of Henry James

Date: August 1962
Creator: Swearingen, James E.
Description: This thesis examines the life and history of author Henry James and discusses morality as a subject in three of his later novels.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
More buildings about songs and food: A case study of Omaha's Slowdown project.

More buildings about songs and food: A case study of Omaha's Slowdown project.

Date: August 2007
Creator: Seman, Michael
Description: The success of independent rock music ("indie rock"), once a marginalized sub-genre of the rock idiom and now a globally recognized cultural force, has impacted the urban landscape of Omaha, Nebraska via the mixed-use urban redevelopment project, "Slowdown" - a result of cultural production by the city's successful indie rock business entities. While geographic research has previously analyzed urban redevelopment initiated by fine artists, the event of indie rock music being a catalyst for urban redevelopment has never been considered in a geographic scope. By examining the topics of affordable technological tools, Omaha's reduced cost-of-living, and cooperative efforts by city leaders, insight into how an indie rock "scene" can become a successful urban redevelopment catalyst is gained.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
More connections, less connection: An examination of the effects of computer-mediated communication on relationships.

More connections, less connection: An examination of the effects of computer-mediated communication on relationships.

Date: December 2006
Creator: McGlynn, Joseph
Description: The impact of computer-mediated communication (CMC) on relational behavior is a topic of increasing interest to communication scholars (McQuillen, 2003; Tidwell & Walther, 2002). One of the most interesting issues that CMC raises concerns the impact of CMC on relational maintenance and development. Using dialectical theory, social exchange theory, social information processing theory, and the hyperpersonal perspective as theoretical frameworks, this study used quantitative and qualitative analyses to identity potential effects of CMC on relationships. Study 1 (n=317) examined the effects of CMC on relational closeness, satisfaction, and social support. Study 2 (n=196) explored the reasons individuals provide for privileging computer-mediated forms of communication, and the perceived effects of using CMC in relational communication. Results indicated that quality of CMC predicted increased perceptions of social support and relationship satisfaction. Results further suggested that CMC enabled participants to manage more effectively relational tensions of autonomy-connection and openness-closedness. Specifically, individuals used CMC to retain higher levels of conversational control, and to maintain greater numbers of relationships with decreased levels of investment. This paper concludes with a discussion of implications and directions for future research.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Morning and Afternoon Response to Exercise Using Two Test Protocols

Morning and Afternoon Response to Exercise Using Two Test Protocols

Date: May 1995
Creator: Jones, Nicole A. (Nicole Amy)
Description: The purpose was to investigate time of day on responses to two types of exhaustive cycle ergometer tests. Sixteen males performed six exercise tests: three - constant power protocol and three - incremental protocol. The first test was a learning trial; the other tests were performed one in the morning and one in the afternoon. ANOVA revealed that O2 deficit and lactate were higher in the afternoon than the morning. Regardless of test type, time to exhaustion tended to be higher in the afternoon. VO2max was unaffected by the time of day and test type. These results confirmprevious reports of a time of day effect on anaerobic capacity, and support the contention that V02max is stable about a day.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Morphological and Hematological Responses to Hypoxia During Development in the Japanese quail,  Coturnix coturnix

Morphological and Hematological Responses to Hypoxia During Development in the Japanese quail, Coturnix coturnix

Date: May 2003
Creator: Elmonoufy, Nourhan
Description: Hypoxic responses in quail development differ depending upon stage, duration and level of oxygen partial pressure of embryo. Incubation was switched to/from 110mmHg partial pressure (hypoxia), to/from 150mmHg (normoxia) during different stages in development, and control was incubated in normoxia throughout. Hatchability and embryo survival resulted in no hatchlings in continuous hypoxia. Responses to various hypoxic exposures throughout development resulted in recovery/repair of hypoxic damage by hatch. Heart and body mass, beak and toe length, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were measured to determine embryo responses to hypoxia during development at days 10, 15, and hatch. Hypoxia seemed to have the most deleterious effects on eggs in continuous hypoxia. Collectively, data indicate critical developmental windows for hypoxia susceptibility, especially during mid-embryonic development.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Morphological and Physiological Changes in Micrococcus Pyogenes Var. Aureus during Development of its Resistance to Terramycin

Morphological and Physiological Changes in Micrococcus Pyogenes Var. Aureus during Development of its Resistance to Terramycin

Date: August 1959
Creator: Watson, Gerald T.
Description: The problem in this investigation consists of, first, the procurement of several strains of Micrococcus pyogenes var. aureus; second, the comparison of the degree and rate of development of resistance of these organisms to terramycin; and, third, to study the morphological and physiological changes which occur during the development of resistance.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Morphological and physiological developmental consequences of parental effects in the chicken embryo (Gallus gallus domesticus) and the zebrafish larva (Danio rerio).

Morphological and physiological developmental consequences of parental effects in the chicken embryo (Gallus gallus domesticus) and the zebrafish larva (Danio rerio).

Date: August 2008
Creator: Ho, Dao H.
Description: Cardiac, metabolic and growth response of early-stage chicken embryos to perturbations in yolk environment was investigated. Also, effects of parental hypoxia exposure on hypoxia resistance, thermal tolerance and body length of zebrafish larvae were investigated. In the first study, thyroxine, triiodothyronine and testosterone produced differential effects on heart rate and development rate of chicken embryos during the first 4 days of development. Triiodothyronine caused a dose-dependent increase in heart rate when applied at 40 or 70 hours of age, while thyroxine caused a dose-dependent increase in heart rate when applied at 40 hours only. Testosterone and propyl-thiouracil (deiodinase antagonist) did not have an effect on heart rate. Development rate was not changed by thyroxine, triiodothyronine, testosterone or propyl-thiouracil, which suggested that heart rate changes did not result from changes in embryo maturity. In the second study, chicken embryos exposed to yolks of different bird species during early-stage embryonic development showed changes in heart rate, mass-specific oxygen consumption and body mass that scaled with the egg mass, incubation period length, and yolk triiodothyronine and testosterone levels of the species from which yolk was derived. In the third study, this phenomenon was investigated between layer and broiler chickens. Heart rate, oxygen consumption ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Morphological properties of poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nanocomposites in relation to fracture toughness.

Morphological properties of poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nanocomposites in relation to fracture toughness.

Date: August 2005
Creator: Pendse, Siddhi
Description: The effect of incorporation of montmorillonite layered silicate (MLS) on poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) matrix was investigated. MLS was added in varying concentration of 1 to 5 weight percent in the PET matrix. DSC and polarized optical microscopy were used to determine the crystallization effects of MLS addition. Non isothermal crystallization kinetics showed that the melting temperature and crystallization temperature decrease as the MLS percent increases. This delayed crystallization along with the irregular spherulitic shape indicates hindered crystallization in the presence of MLS platelets. The influence of this morphology was related with the fracture toughness of PET nanocomposites using essential work of fracture coupled with the infra red (IR) thermography. Both the essential as well as non essential work of fracture decreased on addition of MLS with nanocomposite showing reduced toughness.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A morphological study of the avian (Gallus domesticus) ductus arteriosi during hatching.

A morphological study of the avian (Gallus domesticus) ductus arteriosi during hatching.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2006
Creator: Belanger, Candace
Description: The ductus arteriosi (DA) are two blood vessels connecting the pulmonary arteries to the descending aorta in the avian embryo. Following hatching, the DA closes, separation of the systemic and pulmonary circulation. I present the morphological changes that occur in the chicken DA during prepipping, internal pipping, external pipping, and hatching. The avian DA consists of two distinct tissue types, a proximal and a distal portion. Histological examination shows developmental differences between the proximal and distal portions of the DA with regard to lumen occlusion, endothelial cells, smooth muscle and elastin. Endothelial cell proliferation begins to occur as early as external pipping, with the lumen almost completely occluded by the 3rd day of post-hatching life. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) increases in avian endothelial cells during hatching. I provide a morphological timeline of changes in the DA as the chicken develops from embryo to hatchling.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries