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 Department: College of Education
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
An Analysis of the Treatment of Work Modes in Elementary Basal and Supplementary Reading Textbooks

An Analysis of the Treatment of Work Modes in Elementary Basal and Supplementary Reading Textbooks

Date: May 1973
Creator: Newbury, Fred G.
Description: The purposes of this study are to (1) determine the extent of bias in elementary textbooks in terms of frequency of reference to various work modes, and (2) to determine if qualitative bias exists in the portrayal of work modes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Anatomy of Academic Dishonesty: Cognitive Development, Self-Concept, Neutralization Techniques, and Attitudes Toward Cheating

The Anatomy of Academic Dishonesty: Cognitive Development, Self-Concept, Neutralization Techniques, and Attitudes Toward Cheating

Date: August 2004
Creator: Arvidson, Cody Jean
Description: This study explored the relationship between cheating among university students and their cognitive developmental levels, use of neutralization techniques, self-concept as a multifaceted cognitive construct, and attitude toward cheating. The purposes of this study were to investigate: (1) The relationships between academic dishonesty and each of the following overall independent variables: cognitive development, use of neutralization techniques, self-concept as a multifaceted cognitive construct, and attitude toward cheating, and (2) the reasons behind college student academic cheating behaviors. The study used data from anonymous, self-report surveys administered to undergraduate students in-class and at supplemental sessions. Student participation was voluntary. The study was correlational. The five hypotheses were: (1) Self-concept is significantly and negatively related to academic dishonesty; (2) Cognitive development is significantly and negatively related to academic dishonesty; (3) Attitude toward cheating is significantly and negatively related to academic dishonesty; (4) The use of neutralization techniques is significantly and positively related to academic dishonesty; (5) Cognitive development, self-concept, and attitude toward cheating will make significant contributions to the regression model for the dependent variables of academic dishonesty. The data supported the first, third, and fourth hypotheses. However, the second and fifth hypotheses were supported under certain conditions. The roles of cognitive ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Argumentation Used in the Sex Education Issue in the Dallas Independent School District

Argumentation Used in the Sex Education Issue in the Dallas Independent School District

Date: December 1970
Creator: Ingalls, Arthur Bradford
Description: The primary purpose of the study was to identify and describe the arguments used in the sex education controversy in the Dallas Independent School District. The issue was examined as a debate and as a social movement promoted and resisted by community rhetoricians. Arguments were elicited from interviews with rhetoricians on both sides of the issue.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Arnspiger Value-Oriented Rationale and General Education for Student Self-Understanding and Continuous Self-Development

The Arnspiger Value-Oriented Rationale and General Education for Student Self-Understanding and Continuous Self-Development

Date: August 1972
Creator: Preas, Mary Elizabeth Foster
Description: The problem of this study was to describe a conceptual design for general education with interdisciplinary qualities leading to student self-understanding and continuous self-development. This study emerged out of the need to gain some insight into the causes of decline and/or abandonment of general education programs during periods of social disorganization, and to determine whether a relationship.exists between mounting social problems and the more intense kinds of problems experienced by college-age youth during these periods.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Arousal Responses to Specific Structured Classroom Activities and Events as Determined by Cardiac Telemetry

Arousal Responses to Specific Structured Classroom Activities and Events as Determined by Cardiac Telemetry

Date: June 1970
Creator: Swain, Richard Edward
Description: The purposes of this study were (1) to determine the effects of specific structured classroom activities and events on the cardiac rates of students in the classroom, (2) to determine whether or not there was a detectable difference in the cardiac rates of students involved in structured classroom activities and events and cardiac rates of students not so involved, and (3) to determine the effects on the cardiac rates of students involved in two techniques of attaining student involvement and attention to a classroom discussion or topic.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Attitudes toward Research and Teaching:  Differences Between Faculty and Administrators at Three Saudi Arabian Universities

Attitudes toward Research and Teaching: Differences Between Faculty and Administrators at Three Saudi Arabian Universities

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2000
Creator: Alsouhibani, Mohammed A.
Description: This study is an investigation of the perceived attitudinal differences between administrators and faculty toward research and teaching at three Saudi Arabian universities, King Saud University (KSU), King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), and the Islamic University (IU). The researcher also investigated the effect of several variables, such as rank, university, and academic field on administrators and faculty members' attitudes toward teaching and research. Little Attention has been given to studies that examine the differences between faculty and administrators with regard to their attitudes toward the priorities of teaching and research in Saudi Arabian institutions. Also, little research has been conducted regarding the effects of rank and academic field on faculty attitudes in Saudi Arabian institutions. The author used a mail survey and collected 518 useable responses from a total of 710 questionnaires distributed. Factor analysis, MANCOVA, MANOVA, and ANOVA were the statistical methods employed in data analysis. Five attitudes were identified as a result of factor analysis: (a) attitudes toward teaching; (b) attitudes toward research; (c) mission; (d) promotion; and (e) interest. Results indicated that there was a significant difference between faculty and administrators regarding teaching and resea4rch. Administrators showed stronger attitudes toward teaching than faculty at ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Bias and Precision of the Squared Canonical Correlation Coefficient under Nonnormal Data Conditions

Bias and Precision of the Squared Canonical Correlation Coefficient under Nonnormal Data Conditions

Date: August 2006
Creator: Leach, Lesley Ann Freeny
Description: This dissertation: (a) investigated the degree to which the squared canonical correlation coefficient is biased in multivariate nonnormal distributions and (b) identified formulae that adjust the squared canonical correlation coefficient (Rc2) such that it most closely approximates the true population effect under normal and nonnormal data conditions. Five conditions were manipulated in a fully-crossed design to determine the degree of bias associated with Rc2: distribution shape, variable sets, sample size to variable ratios, and within- and between-set correlations. Very few of the condition combinations produced acceptable amounts of bias in Rc2, but those that did were all found with first function results. The sample size to variable ratio (n:v)was determined to have the greatest impact on the bias associated with the Rc2 for the first, second, and third functions. The variable set condition also affected the accuracy of Rc2, but for the second and third functions only. The kurtosis levels of the marginal distributions (b2), and the between- and within-set correlations demonstrated little or no impact on the bias associated with Rc2. Therefore, it is recommended that researchers use n:v ratios of at least 10:1 in canonical analyses, although greater n:v ratios have the potential to produce even less bias. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Burnout Among Student Affairs Professionals at Metropolitan Universities

Burnout Among Student Affairs Professionals at Metropolitan Universities

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2001
Creator: Murphy, Lynda
Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the level of burnout among student affairs professionals at the 52 U.S. member institutions of the Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities. Packets containing the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the Moos Work Environment Scale (WES), and a demographic survey were mailed to 371 senior student affairs administrators at the member institutions, with a completed response rate of 58.22%. The senior student affairs administrators surveyed included the chief student affairs officers and the professional staff who reported to them. The research design employed t-tests, analyses of variance, and Pearson's Product Moment correlations. The scores obtained from the MBI and WES subscales were compared overall and along 9 independent variablestitle of position, size of institution, appointment, salary, years in current position, years in profession, age, gender, and highest degree attained. Average levels of burnout were found on each of the MBI subscores. Contrary to earlier studies, women did not suffer from statistically significant higher levels of burnout than men, and burnout levels decreased with age and years in the profession for both sexes. Lower scores on the MBI depersonalization subscale were found in employees in mid-career and in professionals from smaller schools. Emotional exhaustion ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Campus Ombudsman as Perceived by College and University Presidents, Vice-Presidents of Student Affairs, Study Body Presidents and Functioning Campus Ombudsmen

The Campus Ombudsman as Perceived by College and University Presidents, Vice-Presidents of Student Affairs, Study Body Presidents and Functioning Campus Ombudsmen

Date: August 1972
Creator: Johnson, Thomas Frank, 1940-
Description: The purposes of this study are (1) to ascertain whether the implementation of a campus ombudsman is viewed differently by college and university presidents, vice-presidents of student affairs, and student body presidents, and (2) to determine whether the ombudsman concept itself is perceived differently by college and university presidents, vice-presidents of student affairs, student body presidents, and functioning campus ombudsmen.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Candidates' perception of training and self-efficacy in traditional and alternative teacher preparation programs.

Candidates' perception of training and self-efficacy in traditional and alternative teacher preparation programs.

Date: May 2003
Creator: Thompson, Tierney M.
Description: This research was encouraged by the tremendous demand for teachers. Two million new teachers will be needed in the United States over the next decade. The teacher shortage has school administration, school boards, education agencies, and institutions of higher education investigating how to train and retain more teachers. Alternative certification programs have been developed to address the teacher shortage. This study examined the effectiveness of traditionally and alternatively certified teachers in two separate programs with regard to their self-efficacy, perception of their training, and their ExCET scores. Traditional candidates (10) and alternative candidates (74) were examined using survey research. According to this data on self-efficacy, perception of training, and ExCET passing rates, there is no significant difference between those teachers who receive traditional training and those who are trained in alternative certification programs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries