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 Department: Department of Computer Science
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Study and Sample Implementation of the Secure Shell Protocol (SSH)

Study and Sample Implementation of the Secure Shell Protocol (SSH)

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2003
Creator: Subramanyam, Udayakiran
Description: Security is one of the main concerns of users who need to connect to a remote computer for various purposes, such as checking e-mails or viewing files. However in today's computer networks, privacy, transmission to intended client is not guaranteed. If data is transmitted over the Internet or a local network as plain text it may be captured and viewed by anyone with little technical knowledge. This may include sensitive data such as passwords. Big businesses use firewalls, virtual private networks and encrypt their transmissions to counter this at high costs. Secure shell protocol (SSH) provides an answer to this. SSH is a software protocol for secure communication over an insecure network. SSH not only offers authentication of hosts but also encrypts the sessions between the client and the server and is transparent to the end user. This Problem in Lieu of Thesis makes a study of SSH and creates a sample secure client and server which follows SSH and examines its performance.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Machine Language Techniques for Conversational Agents

Machine Language Techniques for Conversational Agents

Date: December 2003
Creator: Sule, Manisha D.
Description: Machine Learning is the ability of a machine to perform better at a given task, using its previous experience. Various algorithms like decision trees, Bayesian learning, artificial neural networks and instance-based learning algorithms are used widely in machine learning systems. Current applications of machine learning include credit card fraud detection, customer service based on history of purchased products, games and many more. The application of machine learning techniques to natural language processing (NLP) has increased tremendously in recent years. Examples are handwriting recognition and speech recognition. The problem we tackle in this Problem in Lieu of Thesis is applying machine-learning techniques to improve the performance of a conversational agent. The OpenMind repository of common sense, in the form of question-answer pairs is treated as the training data for the machine learning system. WordNet is interfaced with to capture important semantic and syntactic information about the words in the sentences. Further, k-closest neighbors algorithm, an instance based learning algorithm is used to simulate a case based learning system. The resulting system is expected to be able to answer new queries with knowledge gained from the training data it was fed with.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
XML-Based Agent Scripts and Inference Mechanisms

XML-Based Agent Scripts and Inference Mechanisms

Date: August 2003
Creator: Sun, Guili
Description: Natural language understanding has been a persistent challenge to researchers in various computer science fields, in a number of applications ranging from user support systems to entertainment and online teaching. A long term goal of the Artificial Intelligence field is to implement mechanisms that enable computers to emulate human dialogue. The recently developed ALICEbots, virtual agents with underlying AIML scripts, by A.L.I.C.E. foundation, use AIML scripts - a subset of XML - as the underlying pattern database for question answering. Their goal is to enable pattern-based, stimulus-response knowledge content to be served, received and processed over the Web, or offline, in the manner similar to HTML and XML. In this thesis, we describe a system that converts the AIML scripts to Prolog clauses and reuses them as part of a knowledge processor. The inference mechanism developed in this thesis is able to successfully match the input pattern with our clauses database even if words are missing. We also emulate the pattern deduction algorithm of the original logic deduction mechanism. Our rules, compatible with Semantic Web standards, bring structure to the meaningful content of Web pages and support interactive content retrieval using natural language.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Secret Key Agreement without Public-Key Cryptography

Secret Key Agreement without Public-Key Cryptography

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2003
Creator: Surapaneni, Smitha
Description: Secure communication is the primary challenge in today's information network. In this project an efficient secret key agreement protocol is described and analyzed along with the other existing protocols. We focus primarily on Leighton and Micali's secret-key agreement without the use of public-key encryption techniques. The Leighton-Micali protocol is extremely efficient when implemented in software and has significant advantages over existing systems like Kerberos. In this method the secret keys are agreed upon using a trusted third party known as the trusted agent. The trusted agent generates the keys and writes them to a public directory before it goes offline. The communicating entities can retrieve the keys either from the online trusted agent or from the public directory service and agree upon a symmetric-key without any public-key procedures. The principal advantage of this method is that the user verifies the authenticity of the trusted agent before using the keys generated by it. The Leighton-Micali scheme is not vulnerable to the present day attacks like fabrication, modification or denial of service etc. The Leighton-Micali protocol can be employed in real-time systems like smart cards. In addition to the security properties and the simplicity of the protocol, our experiments show that in ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Exon/Intron Discrimination Using the Finite Induction Pattern Matching Technique

Exon/Intron Discrimination Using the Finite Induction Pattern Matching Technique

Date: December 1997
Creator: Taylor, Pamela A., 1941-
Description: DNA sequence analysis involves precise discrimination of two of the sequence's most important components: exons and introns. Exons encode the proteins that are responsible for almost all the functions in a living organism. Introns interrupt the sequence coding for a protein and must be removed from primary RNA transcripts before translation to protein can occur. A pattern recognition technique called Finite Induction (FI) is utilized to study the language of exons and introns. FI is especially suited for analyzing and classifying large amounts of data representing sequences of interest. It requires no biological information and employs no statistical functions. Finite Induction is applied to the exon and intron components of DNA by building a collection of rules based upon what it finds in the sequences it examines. It then attempts to match the known rule patterns with new rules formed as a result of analyzing a new sequence. A high number of matches predict a probable close relationship between the two sequences; a low number of matches signifies a large amount of difference between the two. This research demonstrates FI to be a viable tool for measurement when known patterns are available for the formation of rule sets.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Computational Complexity of Hopfield Networks

Computational Complexity of Hopfield Networks

Date: August 1998
Creator: Tseng, Hung-Li
Description: There are three main results in this dissertation. They are PLS-completeness of discrete Hopfield network convergence with eight different restrictions, (degree 3, bipartite and degree 3, 8-neighbor mesh, dual of the knight's graph, hypercube, butterfly, cube-connected cycles and shuffle-exchange), exponential convergence behavior of discrete Hopfield network, and simulation of Turing machines by discrete Hopfield Network.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Temporally Correct Algorithms for Transaction Concurrency Control in Distributed Databases

Temporally Correct Algorithms for Transaction Concurrency Control in Distributed Databases

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Tuck, Terry W.
Description: Many activities are comprised of temporally dependent events that must be executed in a specific chronological order. Supportive software applications must preserve these temporal dependencies. Whenever the processing of this type of an application includes transactions submitted to a database that is shared with other such applications, the transaction concurrency control mechanisms within the database must also preserve the temporal dependencies. A basis for preserving temporal dependencies is established by using (within the applications and databases) real-time timestamps to identify and order events and transactions. The use of optimistic approaches to transaction concurrency control can be undesirable in such situations, as they allow incorrect results for database read operations. Although the incorrectness is detected prior to transaction committal and the corresponding transaction(s) restarted, the impact on the application or entity that submitted the transaction can be too costly. Three transaction concurrency control algorithms are proposed in this dissertation. These algorithms are based on timestamp ordering, and are designed to preserve temporal dependencies existing among data-dependent transactions. The algorithms produce execution schedules that are equivalent to temporally ordered serial schedules, where the temporal order is established by the transactions' start times. The algorithms provide this equivalence while supporting currency to the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Extensions to Jinni Mobile Agent Architecture

Extensions to Jinni Mobile Agent Architecture

Date: May 2001
Creator: Tyagi, Satyam
Description: We extend the Jinni mobile agent architecture with a multicast network transport layer, an agent-to-agent delegation mechanism and a reflection based Prolog-to-Java interface. To ensure that our agent infrastructure runs efficiently, independently of router-level multicast support, we describe a blackboard based algorithm for locating a randomly roaming agent. As part of the agent-to-agent delegation mechanism, we describe an alternative to code-fetching mechanism for stronger mobility of mobile agents with less network overhead. In the context of direct and reflection based extension mechanisms for Jinni, we describe the design and the implementation of a reflection based Prolog-to-Java interface. The presence of subtyping and method overloading makes finding the most specific method corresponding to a Prolog call pattern fairly difficult. We describe a run-time algorithm which provides accurate handling of overloaded methods beyond Java's reflection package's limitations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Feasibility of Multicasting in RMI

The Feasibility of Multicasting in RMI

Date: May 2003
Creator: Ujjinihavildar, Vinay
Description: Due to the growing need of the Internet and networking technologies, simple, powerful, easily maintained distributed applications needed to be developed. These kinds of applications can benefit greatly from distributed computing concepts. Despite its powerful mechanisms, Jini has yet to be accepted in mainstream Java development. Until that happens, we need to find better Remote Method Invocation (RMI) solutions. Feasibility of implementation of Multicasting in RMI is worked in this paper. Multicasting capability can be used in RMI using Jini-like technique. Support of Multicast over Unicast reference layer is also studied. A piece of code explaining how it can be done, is added.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
User Modeling Tools for Virtual Architecture

User Modeling Tools for Virtual Architecture

Date: May 2003
Creator: Uppuluri, Raja
Description: As the use of virtual environments (VEs) is becoming more widespread, user needs are becoming a more significant part in those environments. In order to adapt to the needs of the user, a system should be able to infer user interests and goals. I developed an architecture for user modeling to understand users' interests in a VE by monitoring their actions. In this paper, I discussed the architecture and the virtual environment that was created to test it. This architecture employs sensors to keep track of all the users' actions, data structures that can store a record of significant events that have occurred in the environment, and a rule base. The rule base continually monitors the data collected from the sensors, world state, and event history in order to update the user goal inferences. These inferences can then be used to modify the flow of events within a VE.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries