You limited your search to:

 Degree Discipline: History
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Jefferson's Leap of Faith: the Embargo Acts of 1807-1809 as a Failure of Jeffersonian Ideology

Jefferson's Leap of Faith: the Embargo Acts of 1807-1809 as a Failure of Jeffersonian Ideology

Date: December 1994
Creator: Hamilton, James M. (James Milburn)
Description: Thomas Jefferson's political ideology centered on the importance of individual liberty and choice for the common person. Activities throughout his career were grounded on this concept. It is interesting, therefore, that events during the final years of his presidency appear to have prompted him to abandon this philosophy in favor of a more pragmatic, less democratic, approach. The embargo acts which Congress passed at Jefferson's request in between December 1807 and January 1809 outlawed all foreign commercial activities and provided harsh penalties for violations. The president's failure to communicate publicly the reasons he believed these drastic measures were required stand in stark contrast to his political philosophy and left a cloud over his presidency when he left office.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Rise and Fall of a Revolutionary Relationship: George Washington and Thomas Paine, 1776-1796

The Rise and Fall of a Revolutionary Relationship: George Washington and Thomas Paine, 1776-1796

Date: August 2009
Creator: Hamilton, Matthew K.
Description: This study is a cultural and political analysis of the emergence and deterioration of the relationship between George Washington and Thomas Paine. It is informed by modern studies in Atlantic history and culture. It presents the falling out of the two Founding Fathers as a reflection of two competing political cultures, as well as a function of the class aspirations of Washington and Paine. It chronologically examines the two men's interaction with one another from the early days of the American Revolution to the Reign of Terror of the French Revolution. Along the way this study highlights the dynamics that characterized the Washington-Paine relationship and shows how the two men worked together to further their own agendas. This study also points to Thomas Paine's involvement with a web of Democratic Societies in America and to Washington's increasing wariness and suspicion of these Societies as agents of insurrection.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Confederate Government and Mexico: Diplomatic Relations 1861-1865

Confederate Government and Mexico: Diplomatic Relations 1861-1865

Date: 1956
Creator: Hammond, Barbara F.
Description: The purpose of this thesis is not only to trace the diplomatic activities of the Confederate government with its neighbor, Mexico, during the period 1861 to 1865, but to evaluate these diplomatic efforts as to their practical consequences on behalf of the Confederate cause.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Richard Thompson Archer and the Burdens of Proprietorship: The Life of a Natchez District Planter

Richard Thompson Archer and the Burdens of Proprietorship: The Life of a Natchez District Planter

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2001
Creator: Hammond, Carol D.
Description: In 1824 a young Virginia aristocrat named Richard Thompson Archer migrated to Mississippi. Joining in the boom years of expansion in the Magnolia State in the 1830s, Archer built a vast cotton empire. He and his wife, Ann Barnes, raised a large family at Anchuca, their home plantation in Claiborne County, Mississippi. From there Richard Archer ruled a domain that included more than 500 slaves and 13,000 acres of land. On the eve of the Civil War he was one of the wealthiest men in the South. This work examines the life of Richard Archer from his origins in Amelia County, Virginia, to his death in Mississippi in 1867. It takes as its thesis the theme of Archer's life: his burdens as proprietor of a vast cotton empire and as father figure and provider for a large extended family. This theme weaves together the strands of Archer's life, including his rise to the position of great planter, his duties as husband and father, and his political beliefs and activities. Archer's story is told against the background of the history of Mississippi and of the South, from their antebellum heyday, through the Civil War, and into the early years of Reconstruction. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Political and Congressional Career of John Hancock, 1865-1885

The Political and Congressional Career of John Hancock, 1865-1885

Date: May 1996
Creator: Hancock, W. Daniel
Description: John Hancock was a Texas Unionist. After the Civil War, he became an opponent of the Radical Republicans. He was elected to Congress in 1871 and had some success working on issues important to Texas. As the state was redeemed from Radical Republican rule, Hancock was increasingly attacked for his Unionism. This led to a tough fight for renomination in 1874, and losses in races for the U.S. Senate and renomination in 1876. He was an unsuccessful congressional candidate in 1878, but was elected again in 1882. By then his political influence had waned and he did not seek renomination in 1884. Hancock had the potential to be a major political leader, but lingering resentment to his Unionism hampered his political career.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Study of Southern Insurgency Within the Texas Congressional Delegation, 1933-1938

A Study of Southern Insurgency Within the Texas Congressional Delegation, 1933-1938

Date: August 1976
Creator: Haney, Jan P.
Description: This study focuses upon the Texas congressional delegation from 1933 to 1938 in an attempt to determine the extent of southern insurgency within that group. Following an examination of the Redeemer-insurgent dichotomy in southern politics since Reconstruction, the thesis analyzes roll-call votes on New Deal legislation concerning agricultural, financial, relief, and labor reform issues to demonstrate that a spirit of southern insurgency existed in Texas politics in the 1930's. The study concludes that Morris Sheppard, Sam Rayburn, Maury Maverick, W. D. McFarlane, R. Ewing Thomason, and Lyndon B. Johnson were politicians in the tradition of southern insurgents. The influence of these men, especially Sheppard, Rayburn, and Maverick, on the passage of legislation reflecting insurgent demands is demonstrated to be significant.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Phantom Menace: the F-4 in Air Combat in Vietnam

The Phantom Menace: the F-4 in Air Combat in Vietnam

Date: August 2013
Creator: Hankins, Michael W.
Description: The F-4 Phantom II was the United States' primary air superiority fighter aircraft during the Vietnam War. This airplane epitomized American airpower doctrine during the early Cold War, which diminished the role of air-to-air combat and the air superiority mission. As a result, the F-4 struggled against the Soviet MiG fighters used by the North Vietnamese Air Force. By the end of the Rolling Thunder bombing campaign in 1968, the Phantom traded kills with MiGs at a nearly one-to-one ratio, the worst air combat performance in American history. The aircraft also regularly failed to protect American bombing formations from MiG attacks. A bombing halt from 1968 to 1972 provided a chance for American planners to evaluate their performance and make changes. The Navy began training pilots specifically for air combat, creating the Navy Fighter Weapons School known as "Top Gun" for this purpose. The Air Force instead focused on technological innovation and upgrades to their equipment. The resumption of bombing and air combat in the 1972 Linebacker campaigns proved that the Navy's training practices were effective, while the Air Force's technology changes were not, with kill ratios becoming worse. However, the last three months of the campaign introduced an American ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Historical and Technical Development of the United States and Confederate States Navies during the Civil War

The Historical and Technical Development of the United States and Confederate States Navies during the Civil War

Date: 1951
Creator: Hanscom, John Francis
Description: This study will cover the period between 1861 and 1865. It will cover within that period of time, the technical and historical advance of the navy through the Civil War. The technical approach will cover the advancements in design, engineering, and armament from the beginning of hostilities to its end, and contrast those advancements with those of the period immediately preceding them and immediately after it, while the historical approach will cover the main engagements of the war and the results of the technical advances. The study will also cover the advancement and growth of the Confederate States Navy, and the effect which the marine designs of that navy had on the designs of the rival United States Navy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Military and Political Career of Santos Degollado, 1854-1861

The Military and Political Career of Santos Degollado, 1854-1861

Date: August 1971
Creator: Hardi, John T.
Description: The purpose of this study is to examine the role of Santos Degollado in the history of Mexico during the 1850's and to determine his contributions to the cause of constitutional reform in that period.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Farming Someone Else's Land: Farm Tenancy in the Texas Brazos River Valley, 1850-1880

Farming Someone Else's Land: Farm Tenancy in the Texas Brazos River Valley, 1850-1880

Date: December 1988
Creator: Harper, Cecil
Description: This dissertation develops and utilizes a methodology for combining data drawn from the manuscript census returns and the county tax rolls to study landless farmers during the period from 1850 until 1880 in three Texas Brazos River Valley counties: Fort Bend, Milam, and Palo Pinto. It focuses in particular on those landless farmers who appear to have had no option other than tenant farming. It concludes that there were such landless farmers throughout the period, although they were a relatively insignificant factor in the agricultural economy before the Civil War. During the Antebellum decade, poor tenant farmers were a higher proportion of the population on the frontier than in the interior, but throughout the period, they were found in higher numbers in the central portion of the river valley. White tenants generally avoided the coastal plantation areas, although by 1880, that pattern seemed to be changing. Emancipation had tremendous impact on both black and white landless farmers. Although both groups were now theoretically competing for the same resource, productive crop land, their reactions during the first fifteen years were so different that it suggests two systems of tenant farming divided by caste. As population expansion put increasing pressure on the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries