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 Department: Department of Computer Science
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
The Design and Implementation of an Intelligent Agent-Based File System

The Design and Implementation of an Intelligent Agent-Based File System

Date: May 2000
Creator: Hopper, S. Andrew
Description: As bandwidth constraints on LAN/WAN environments decrease, the demand for distributed services will continue to increase. In particular, the proliferation of user-level applications requiring high-capacity distributed file storage systems will demand that such services be universally available. At the same time, the advent of high-speed networks have made the deployment of application and communication solutions based upon an Intelligent Mobile Agent (IMA) framework practical. Agents have proven to present an ideal development paradigm for the creation of autonomous large-scale distributed systems, and an agent-based communication scheme would facilitate the creation of independently administered distributed file services. This thesis thus outlines an architecture for such a distributed file system based upon an IMA communication framework.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) for Children Story Selection in ASP.NET and C#

Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) for Children Story Selection in ASP.NET and C#

Date: December 2003
Creator: Hu, Demin
Description: This paper describes the general architecture and function of a Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) system implemented with ASP.NET and C#. Microsoft Visual Studio .NET and XML Web Services provide a flexible, standards-based model that allows clients to access data. Web Form Pages offer a powerful programming model for Web-enabled user interface. The system provides a variety of mechanisms and services related to story retrieval and adaptation. Users may browse and search a library of text stories. More advanced CBR capabilities were also implemented, including a multi-factor distance-calculation for matching user interests with stories in the library, recommendations on optimizing search, and adaptation of stories to match user interests.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Dynamic Resource Management in RSVP- Controlled Unicast Networks

Dynamic Resource Management in RSVP- Controlled Unicast Networks

Date: December 2001
Creator: Iyengar Prasanna, Venkatesan
Description: Resources are said to be fragmented in the network when they are available in non-contiguous blocks, and calls are dropped as they may not end sufficient resources. Hence, available resources may remain unutilized. In this thesis, the effect of resource fragmentation (RF) on RSVP-controlled networks was studied and new algorithms were proposed to reduce the effect of RF. In order to minimize the effect of RF, resources in the network are dynamically redistributed on different paths to make them available in contiguous blocks. Extra protocol messages are introduced to facilitate resource redistribution in the network. The Dynamic Resource Redistribution (DRR) algorithm when used in conjunction with RSVP, not only increased the number of calls accommodated into the network but also increased the overall resource utilization of the network. Issues such as how many resources need to be redistributed and of which call(s), and how these choices affect the redistribution process were investigated. Further, various simulation experiments were conducted to study the performance of the DRR algorithm on different network topologies with varying traffic characteristics.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Programming Language For Concurrent Processing

A Programming Language For Concurrent Processing

Date: August 1972
Creator: Jackson, Portia M.
Description: This thesis is a proposed solution to the problem of including an effective interrupt mechanism in the set of concurrent- processing primitives of a block-structured programming language or system. The proposed solution is presented in the form of a programming language definition and model. The language is called TRIPLE.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Self-Optimizing Dynamic Finite Functions

Self-Optimizing Dynamic Finite Functions

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2003
Creator: Jeripothula, Ramesh
Description: Finite functions (also called maps) are used to describe a number of key computations and storage mechanisms used in software and hardware interpreters. Their presence spread over various memory and speed hierarchies in hardware and through various optimization processes (algorithmic and compilation based) in software, suggests encapsulating dynamic size changes and representation optimizations in a unique abstraction to be used across traditional computation mechanisms. We developed a memory allocator for testing the finite functions. We have implemented some dynamic finite functions and performed certain experiments to see the performance speed of these finite functions. We have developed some simple but powerful application programming interfaces (API) for these finite functions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Embedded monitors for detecting and preventing intrusions in cryptographic and application protocols.

Embedded monitors for detecting and preventing intrusions in cryptographic and application protocols.

Date: December 2003
Creator: Joglekar, Sachin P.
Description: There are two main approaches for intrusion detection: signature-based and anomaly-based. Signature-based detection employs pattern matching to match attack signatures with observed data making it ideal for detecting known attacks. However, it cannot detect unknown attacks for which there is no signature available. Anomaly-based detection builds a profile of normal system behavior to detect known and unknown attacks as behavioral deviations. However, it has a drawback of a high false alarm rate. In this thesis, we describe our anomaly-based IDS designed for detecting intrusions in cryptographic and application-level protocols. Our system has several unique characteristics, such as the ability to monitor cryptographic protocols and application-level protocols embedded in encrypted sessions, a very lightweight monitoring process, and the ability to react to protocol misuse by modifying protocol response directly.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Routing Optimization in Wireless Ad Hoc and Wireless Sensor Networks

Routing Optimization in Wireless Ad Hoc and Wireless Sensor Networks

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2003
Creator: Joseph, Linus
Description: Wireless ad hoc networks are expected to play an important role in civilian and military settings where wireless access to wired backbone is either ineffective or impossible. Wireless sensor networks are effective in remote data acquisition. Congestion control and power consumption in wireless ad hoc networks have received a lot of attention in recent research. Several algorithms have been proposed to reduce congestion and power consumption in wireless ad hoc and sensor networks. In this thesis, we focus upon two schemes, which deal with congestion control and power consumption issues. This thesis consists of two parts. In the first part, we describe a randomization scheme for congestion control in dynamic source routing protocol, which we refer to as RDSR. We also study a randomization scheme for GDSR protocol, a GPS optimized variant of DSR. We discuss RDSR and RGDSR implementations and present extensive simulation experiments to study their performance. Our results indicate that both RGDSR and RDSR protocols outperform their non-randomized counterparts by decreasing the number of route query packets. Furthermore, a probabilistic congestion control scheme based on local tuning of routing protocol parameters is shown to be feasible. In the second part we present a simulation based performance study ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Algorithms for Efficient Utilization of Wireless Bandwidth and to Provide Quality-of-Service in Wireless Networks

Algorithms for Efficient Utilization of Wireless Bandwidth and to Provide Quality-of-Service in Wireless Networks

Date: August 2000
Creator: Kakani, Naveen Kumar
Description: This thesis presents algorithms to utilize the wireless bandwidth efficiently and at the same time meet the quality of service (QoS) requirements of the users. In the proposed algorithms we present an adaptive frame structure based upon the airlink frame loss probability and control the admission of call requests into the system based upon the load on the system and the QoS requirements of the incoming call requests. The performance of the proposed algorithms is studied by developing analytical formulations and simulation experiments. Finally we present an admission control algorithm which uses an adaptive delay computation algorithm to compute the queuing delay for each class of traffic and adapts the service rate and the reliability in the estimates based upon the deviation in the expected and obtained performance. We study the performance of the call admission control algorithm by simulation experiments. Simulation results for the adaptive frame structure algorithm show an improvement in the number of users in the system but there is a drop in the system throughput. In spite of the lower throughput the adaptive frame structure algorithm has fewer QoS delay violations. The adaptive call admission control algorithm adapts the call dropping probability of different classes of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Server load balancing.

Server load balancing.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Kanuri, Jaichandra
Description: Server load balancing technology has obtained much attention as much business proceeded towards e-commerce. The idea behind is to have set of clustered servers that share the load as against a single server to achieve better performance and throughput. In this problem in lieu of thesis, I propose and evaluate an implementation of a prototype scalable server. The prototype consists of a load-balanced cluster of hosts that collectively accept and service TCP connections. The host IP addresses are advertised using the Round Robin DNS technique, allowing any host to receive requests from any client. Once a client attempts to establish a TCP connection with one of the hosts, a decision is made as to whether or not the connection should be redirected to a different host namely, the host with the lowest number of established connections. This problem in lieu of thesis outlines the history of load balancing, various options available today and finally approach for implementing the prototype and the corresponding findings.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Analyzing Microwave Spectra Collected by the Solar Radio Burst Locator

Analyzing Microwave Spectra Collected by the Solar Radio Burst Locator

Date: May 2007
Creator: Kincaid, Cheryl-Annette
Description: Modern communication systems rely heavily upon microwave, radio, and other electromagnetic frequency bands as a means of providing wireless communication links. Although convenient, wireless communication is susceptible to electromagnetic interference. Solar activity causes both direct interference through electromagnetic radiation as well as indirect interference caused by charged particles interacting with Earth's magnetic field. The Solar Radio Burst Locator (SRBL) is a United States Air Force radio telescope designed to detect and locate solar microwave bursts as they occur on the Sun. By analyzing these events, the Air Force hopes to gain a better understanding of the root causes of solar interference and improve interference forecasts. This thesis presents methods of searching and analyzing events found in the previously unstudied SRBL data archive. A new web-based application aids in the searching and visualization of the data. Comparative analysis is performed amongst data collected by SRBL and several other instruments. This thesis also analyzes events across the time, intensity, and frequency domains. These analysis methods can be used to aid in the detection and understanding of solar events so as to provide improved forecasts of solar-induced electromagnetic interference.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries