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 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Modeling Alcohol Consumption Using Blog Data

Modeling Alcohol Consumption Using Blog Data

Date: May 2013
Creator: Koh, Kok Chuan
Description: How do the content and writing style of people who drink alcohol beverages stand out from non-drinkers? How much information can we learn about a person's alcohol consumption behavior by reading text that they have authored? This thesis attempts to extend the methods deployed in authorship attribution and authorship profiling research into the domain of automatically identifying the human action of drinking alcohol beverages. I examine how a psycholinguistics dictionary (the Linguistics Inquiry and Word Count lexicon, developed by James Pennebaker), together with Kenneth Burke's concept of words as symbols of human action, and James Wertsch's concept of mediated action provide a framework for analyzing meaningful data patterns from the content of blogs written by consumers of alcohol beverages. The contributions of this thesis to the research field are twofold. First, I show that it is possible to automatically identify blog posts that have content related to the consumption of alcohol beverages. And second, I provide a framework and tools to model human behavior through text analysis of blog data.
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Modeling and reduction of gate leakage during behavioral synthesis of nanoscale CMOS circuits.

Modeling and reduction of gate leakage during behavioral synthesis of nanoscale CMOS circuits.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2006
Creator: Velagapudi, Ramakrishna
Description: The major sources of power dissipation in a nanometer CMOS circuit are capacitive switching, short-circuit current, static leakage and gate oxide tunneling. However, with the aggressive scaling of technology the gate oxide direct tunneling current (gate leakage) is emerging as a prominent component of power dissipation. For sub-65 nm CMOS technology where the gate oxide (SiO2) thickness is very low, the direct tunneling current is the major form of tunneling. There are two contribution parts in this thesis: analytical modeling of behavioral level components for direct tunneling current and propagation delay, and the reduction of tunneling current during behavioral synthesis. Gate oxides of multiple thicknesses are useful in reducing the gate leakage dissipation. Analytical models from first principles to calculate the tunneling current and the propagation delay of behavioral level components is presented, which are backed by BSIM4/5 models and SPICE simulations. These components are characterized for 45 nm technology and an algorithm is provided for scheduling of datapath operations such that the overall tunneling current dissipation of a datapath circuit under design is minimal. It is observed that the oxide thickness that is being considered is very low it may not remain constant during the course of fabrication. Hence ...
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Modeling Changes in End-user Relevance Criteria : An Information Seeking Study

Modeling Changes in End-user Relevance Criteria : An Information Seeking Study

Date: May 1998
Creator: Bateman, Judith Ann
Description: This study examines the importance of relevance criteria in end-user evaluation of valuable or high relevant information.
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Modeling Complex Forest Ecology in a Parallel Computing Infrastructure

Modeling Complex Forest Ecology in a Parallel Computing Infrastructure

Date: August 2003
Creator: Mayes, John
Description: Effective stewardship of forest ecosystems make it imperative to measure, monitor, and predict the dynamic changes of forest ecology. Measuring and monitoring provides us a picture of a forest's current state and the necessary data to formulate models for prediction. However, societal and natural events alter the course of a forest's development. A simulation environment that takes into account these events will facilitate forest management. In this thesis, we describe an efficient parallel implementation of a land cover use model, Mosaic, and discuss the development efforts to incorporate spatial interaction and succession dynamics into the model. To evaluate the performance of our implementation, an extensive set of simulation experiments was carried out using a dataset representing the H.J. Andrews Forest in the Oregon Cascades. Results indicate that a significant reduction in the simulation execution time of our parallel model can be achieved as compared to uni-processor simulations.
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Modeling Infectious Disease Spread Using Global Stochastic Field Simulation

Modeling Infectious Disease Spread Using Global Stochastic Field Simulation

Date: August 2006
Creator: Venkatachalam, Sangeeta
Description: Susceptibles-infectives-removals (SIR) and its derivatives are the classic mathematical models for the study of infectious diseases in epidemiology. In order to model and simulate epidemics of an infectious disease, a global stochastic field simulation paradigm (GSFS) is proposed, which incorporates geographic and demographic based interactions. The interaction measure between regions is a function of population density and geographical distance, and has been extended to include demographic and migratory constraints. The progression of diseases using GSFS is analyzed, and similar behavior to the SIR model is exhibited by GSFS, using the geographic information systems (GIS) gravity model for interactions. The limitations of the SIR and similar models of homogeneous population with uniform mixing are addressed by the GSFS model. The GSFS model is oriented to heterogeneous population, and can incorporate interactions based on geography, demography, environment and migration patterns. The progression of diseases can be modeled at higher levels of fidelity using the GSFS model, and facilitates optimal deployment of public health resources for prevention, control and surveillance of infectious diseases.
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Modeling of land use change effects on storm water quantity and quality in the City of Carrollton and the North Texas Area.

Modeling of land use change effects on storm water quantity and quality in the City of Carrollton and the North Texas Area.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2003
Creator: Duncan, Phillip Brent
Description: Development and population are rapidly increasing in urbanizing areas of North Texas and so is the need to understand changes in storm water runoff flow and its contamination by nutrients, sediment, pesticides and other toxicants. This study contributes to this understanding and has two primary components: first, development of a graphical user interface for a geographic information system and storm water management database, and second, performing a two-scale hydrological modeling approach (the US Corp of Engineers HEC-HMS model and the US Environmental Protection Agency SWMM model). Both primary components are used together as a toolkit to support the storm water management program of the City of Carrollton, located in North Texas. By focusing limited city resources, the toolkit helps storm water managers in the process of compliance with federal regulations, especially the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit, and provides guidance for reporting, planning and investigation. A planning example was conducted by modeling potential changes in storm water quality due to projections of land use based on the City of Carrollton's Comprehensive Plan. An additional component of this study is the evaluation of future changes in surface water quantity and quality in the North Central Texas area, specifically in a ...
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Modeling Place Vulnerability of HIV/AIDS in Texas

Modeling Place Vulnerability of HIV/AIDS in Texas

Date: August 2011
Creator: Harold, Adam F.
Description: This study provides a measurable model of the concept of place vulnerability for HIV/AIDS that incorporates both community and structural level effects using data provided at the ZIP code level from the Texas Department of State Health Services. Sociological literature on the effects of place on health has been growing but falls short of providing an operational definition of the effects of place on health. This dissertation looks to the literature in medical/health geography to supplement sociology’s understanding of the effects of place on health, to the end of providing a measurable model. Prior research that has recognized the complexity of the effects of place still have forced data into one scale and emphasized individual-level outcomes. A multilevel model allows for keeping the associated spatial unit data, without aggregating or parsing it out for convenience of model fit. The place vulnerability model proposed examines how exposure, capacity and potentiality variables all influence an area’s HIV/AIDS count. To capture the effects of place vulnerability at multiple levels, this dissertation research uses a multilevel zero-inflated poisson (MLZIP) model to examine how factors measured at the ZIP code and county both affect HIV/AIDS counts per ZIP code as an outcome. Furthermore, empirical Bayes ...
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Modeling Student Perception of Web 2.0 Technologies Adoption in Kuwait

Modeling Student Perception of Web 2.0 Technologies Adoption in Kuwait

Date: May 2011
Creator: Alajmi, Mohammad
Description: The primary focus of this dissertation was to explore students' perceptions of adopting Web 2.0 applications at the School of Basic Education (SBE) in Kuwait. Although Web 2.0 applications are becoming more popular among the digital generation, there is still no evidence of students' perceptions of adopting the innovation of Web 2.0 technologies in Kuwait. The problem this study addresses is that the current status of Web 2.0 technologies usage by academic students has remained educationally unknown in Kuwait. Therefore, there was a need to investigate the extent to which academic students in SBE are aware of and their usage of Web 2.0 technologies, as well as the factors and obstacles that affect using these technologies. Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory (DoI) is employed in this study to specify the factors that influence student perceptions of adopting Web 2.0 applications as learning tools. Data used in this dissertation was gathered via a survey instrument from 350 students at the SBE and was statistically analyzed to find out the answers of the research questions. This study identified the low rate of Web 2.0 awareness and adoption by the students. Descriptive statistical analysis, such as mean scores and standard deviation, were used ...
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Modeling Synergistic Relationships Between Words and Images

Modeling Synergistic Relationships Between Words and Images

Date: December 2012
Creator: Leong, Chee Wee
Description: Texts and images provide alternative, yet orthogonal views of the same underlying cognitive concept. By uncovering synergistic, semantic relationships that exist between words and images, I am working to develop novel techniques that can help improve tasks in natural language processing, as well as effective models for text-to-image synthesis, image retrieval, and automatic image annotation. Specifically, in my dissertation, I will explore the interoperability of features between language and vision tasks. In the first part, I will show how it is possible to apply features generated using evidence gathered from text corpora to solve the image annotation problem in computer vision, without the use of any visual information. In the second part, I will address research in the reverse direction, and show how visual cues can be used to improve tasks in natural language processing. Importantly, I propose a novel metric to estimate the similarity of words by comparing the visual similarity of concepts invoked by these words, and show that it can be used further to advance the state-of-the-art methods that employ corpus-based and knowledge-based semantic similarity measures. Finally, I attempt to construct a joint semantic space connecting words with images, and synthesize an evaluation framework to quantify cross-modal ...
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Modeling the chemical and photophysical properties of gold complexes.

Modeling the chemical and photophysical properties of gold complexes.

Date: August 2004
Creator: Barakat, Khaldoon A.
Description: Various gold complexes were computationally investigated, to probe their photophysical, geometric, and bonding properties. The geometry of AuI complexes (ground state singlet) is very sensitive to the electronic nature of the ligands: σ-donors gave a two-coordinate, linear shape; however, σ-acceptors yielded a three-coordinate, trigonal planar geometry. Doublet AuIIL3 complexes distort to T-shape, and are thus ground state models of the corresponding triplet AuIL3. The disproportionation of AuIIL3 to AuIL3 and AuIIIL3 is endothermic for all ligands investigated, however, σ-donors are better experimental targets for AuII complexes. For dimeric AuI complexes, only one gold center in the optimized triplet exciton displays a Jahn-Teller distortion, and the Au---Au distance is reduced versus the ground state distance (i.e., two reasons for large Stokes' shifts).
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