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The Lyric, Elegiac, and Euphonic Qualities of Ernst Krenek's Compositional Style as Exemplified in the Early Toccata und Chaconne über en Chorale, "Ja, ich glaub an Jesum Christum," Op. 13: Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of W.A. Mozart, F. Schubert, C. Nielsen, L.v. Beethoven, J. Brahms, F. Liszt, A. Berg and F. Martin

The Lyric, Elegiac, and Euphonic Qualities of Ernst Krenek's Compositional Style as Exemplified in the Early Toccata und Chaconne über en Chorale, "Ja, ich glaub an Jesum Christum," Op. 13: Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of W.A. Mozart, F. Schubert, C. Nielsen, L.v. Beethoven, J. Brahms, F. Liszt, A. Berg and F. Martin

Date: May 1990
Creator: Hibler, Starla Dawn
Description: Ernst Krenek is noted and often criticized for the diversity of his overall output. However, one finds that his entire output is held together by a unique temperament regardless of stylistic changes. It is significant to compare the piano works to one another as the piano was the instrument he repeatedly turned to while testing new stylistic ideas. In writing about Krenek's music, Glenn Gould states eloquently and concisely that three qualities prevail in all of Krenek's mature output: the lyric, elegiac, and euphonic. These qualities are present in the early Toccata und Chaconne uber den Chorale, "Ja, ich glaub an Jesum Christum," Op. 13. It is lyrical in that melody is of utmost importance. One finds that melodic writing prevails in the other piano works as well regardless of when they were written. The elegiac also permeates the work. The Toccata and Chaconne shares with other later works this quality of seriousness, repose, and deep meaning. The Toccata and Chaconne is also euphonic. Krenek's overall style is one which does not shock or offend an audience. In a detailed comparison of the Toccata and Chaconne to later piano works, one may clearly see what Krenek specifically does musically to ...
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The Role of Higher Education in Africa: a Study of the Attitude of African Educators Toward the Tananarive Recommendations

The Role of Higher Education in Africa: a Study of the Attitude of African Educators Toward the Tananarive Recommendations

Date: December 1989
Creator: Laryea, Evans A.
Description: This study concerns the perceptions of African educators concerning the role of higher education in Africa. The study investigates African educators' awareness, understanding, opinions, and reactions to the role of higher education as defined by the Tananarive Conference on the development of higher education in Africa. The data were collected through personal interviews with 80 educators affiliated with the universities of the English—speaking countries in Middle Africa. The findings of the study reveal that (a) the Tananarive recommendations are still realistic and relevant to the African situation; (b) African educators agree that universities in Africa must contribute to the definition and development of African economic, social, and cultural goals; (c) African universities are judged mainly by how successfully their objectives and achievements improve society; (d) the critical problems confronting the African universities are finance, colonial origin, attachment to metropolitan models and standards, training of staff in overseas institutions, brain drain, and government interference; and (e) mutual trust and understanding of role-expectation between African governments and universities is required for universities to fulfill their developmental role in African societies.
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Development of an Expert System to Teach Diagnostic Skills

Development of an Expert System to Teach Diagnostic Skills

Date: August 1990
Creator: Elieson, S. Willard (Sanfred Willard)
Description: The primary purpose of the study was to develop an expert system that could C D perform medical diagnoses In selected problem areas, and C2) provide diagnostic Insights to assist medical students In their training. An expert system Is a computer-based set of procedures and algorithms that can solve problems In a given domain. Two research questions were proposed. The first was "Given a problem space defined by a matrix of diseases and symptoms, can a computer-based model be derived that will consistently perform accurate and efficient diagnoses of cases within that problem area?" The second question was "If the techniques derived from the model are taught to a medical student, is there a subsequent improvement of diagnostic skill?" An expert system was developed which met the objectives of the study. It was able to diagnose cases in the two problem areas studied with an accuracy of 94-95%. Furthermore, it was able to perform those diagnoses in a very efficient manner, often using no more than the theoretical minimum number of steps. The expert system employed three phases: rapid search by discrimination, confirmation by pattern matching against prototypes, and elimination of some candidates (impossible states) by making use of negative ...
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Adolescent Discouragement: Development of an Assessment Instrument

Adolescent Discouragement: Development of an Assessment Instrument

Date: May 1990
Creator: Lingg, MaryAnn
Description: The Adolescent Discouragement Indicator (ADI) was developed to assess the Adlerian construct of discouragement. The 75-item ADI contains five subscales corresponding to the five life tasks specified in Individual Psychology and is specifically designed to pinpoint the area and degree of adolescent discouragement. Item selection was based on ratings by five prominent Adlerians and item correlation with subscale scores. Age and sex norms for the ADI were established on 225 females and 299 males 12 to 18 years of age. Findings indicate that female adolescents are less discouraged than male adolescents on all scales except the love scale and both sexes reported the least amount of discouragment on the love scale. The only significant difference among the age groups is between the 13-year-olds and the 15, 16, and 17-year-olds on the love scale. An internal consistency coefficient of .95, a 2-week test-retest coefficient of .89, and a 4-week test-retest coefficient of .92 indicates that the ADI is a reliable instrument. Negative and significant (p < .001) correlations between the ADI and Social Interest Index (Greever, Tseng, & Friedland, 1973) and between the ADI and the Social Interest Scale (Crandall, 1975) contribute to construct validity and support Adler's belief that discouragement ...
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An Ethnographic Study of the Use of Puppetry with a Children's Group

An Ethnographic Study of the Use of Puppetry with a Children's Group

Date: August 1990
Creator: Deniger, Marcy M. (Marcy Marble)
Description: This study utilized an ethnographic methodology to examine and describe the various aspects and processes occurring in a children's group as the members created their own puppets and accompanying puppet plays. Individual and interactive behavior patterns were isolated and analyzed as a means of gaining an in depth understanding of the puppetry process. The puppetry process, in turn, was viewed in terms of information it provided regarding the individual members and the group process. The facilitative and non-facilitative aspects of the procedure were delineated. The adult leader met with a group of six boys, in grades four and five, for 12 one-hour sessions in which they made puppets and then created puppet plays around issues that they had articulated as problems. The group sessions were videotaped and transcribed. The transcriptions were coded in an effort to extensively analyze the puppetry process and the group process, and the ways in which the two processes interacted. An independent observer/rater was utilized in order to provide some validity for the researcher's reported results. The puppet-making task appeared to offer an opportunity for individuals to begin to come together in a common, but individual task. Characteristic styles and individual personality dynamics were evidenced. General ...
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Educational Activities at the University of Jordan in Two Decades (1962-1982)

Educational Activities at the University of Jordan in Two Decades (1962-1982)

Date: May 1990
Creator: Sammour, Hael Y.
Description: This study examined the educational activities at the University of Jordan, established in 1962, which is the oldest university in the country. The study traced the historical development of the university, which emphasizes highly-qualified graduates, and analyzed some of its educational practices. Research on this subject is limited. Jordanians have written little about their educational system, and there is little evidence of foreign scholars' interest in the subject. Some researchers argued that national pride was the main reason for establishing the university, since financial resources were not available to initiate and sustain serious research. The university started in the fall semester of 1962 with 167 students and one faculty, the Faculty of Arts. Two decades later, the university had ten faculties: Commerce and Administrative Sciences, Sciences, Medical Sciences (Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy), Agriculture, Education, Law, Engineering, Sharia, and Physical Education. The total number of staff continued to increase from 7 in 1962 to 627 by 1982. The size of the physical structure increased from one building to 40 buildings with approximately 18,000 square meters in 1982. As of 1982, more than 15,253 students had graduated from the university with bachelor's, master's, and diplomas-in-education degrees. In 1972, the University of Jordan ...
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Factors Associated with the Use of Ingratiatory Behaviors in Organizational Settings: an Empirical Investigation

Factors Associated with the Use of Ingratiatory Behaviors in Organizational Settings: an Empirical Investigation

Date: May 1990
Creator: Kumar, Kamalesh
Description: Although ingratiatory behaviors have been investigated by social psychologists for almost twenty-five years, and have been discussed as being used in organizational settings as an upward influence strategy, few empirical studies have explored the use of ingratiation in organizations. The intent of this study has been to empirically investigate the use of ingratiatory behaviors in organizational settings. In doing so, a theory-based rationale for the occurrence of ingratiatory behaviors in organizational settings was developed. The framework developed for this study examined ingratiation as both an individually initiated and organizationally induced behavior. Next, a scale was developed to measure the frequency with which employees resort to ingratiatory behaviors in relationships with their superiors. Finally, a series of research propositions about the occurrence of ingratiatory behaviors in organizations were tested across a variety of organizational settings.
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The Relationship of Self-Concept and Study Habits of At-Risk Students as Measured by the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale and the Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes

The Relationship of Self-Concept and Study Habits of At-Risk Students as Measured by the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale and the Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes

Date: August 1990
Creator: Carpenter, Robert M. (Robert Marshall)
Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between self-concept and study habits among different subgroups of 9th grade at-risk students. The study included the administration of two independent measures: The Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale and the Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes. Other data were self-reported by the students. The five subgroups selected in this study were: (1) male and female, (2) white and non-white, (3) socioeconomic groups determined by eligibi1ity in the Free/Reduced Lunch Program, (4) retained and non-retained students, and (5) participants and non-participants in school activities. Raw scores from the self-concept scale and study habits survey were converted into percentile scores. A correlation coefficient was calculated for each subgroup. The significance of the two correlation coefficients was tested using Fisher's Zr transformation. Of the five hypotheses tested at the .05 level, all were rejected. Major findings of the study verify other research regarding characteristics of at-risk students. Also, more than half of the subjects had deficient study habits but only a small percentage (19,5V#) had signif icant ly low self-concept scores. In addition, at-risk students who participate in school activities had higher self-concept scores and study habits scores than non-participating at-risk students. It was concluded ...
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The Presidency of William M. Pearce, Jr.: A History of Texas Wesleyan College From 1968 to 1978

The Presidency of William M. Pearce, Jr.: A History of Texas Wesleyan College From 1968 to 1978

Date: May 1990
Creator: Taylor, Melodye Smith
Description: For almost two hundred years, liberal arts colleges dominated the American system of higher education. The Wesleyan movement into education was a missionary movement to provide an education to those denied this privilege by the class prejudices of the eighteenth century. Founded by the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Texas Wesleyan University (originally known as Polytechnic College) began in 1891 with 11 faculty members and 173 students. It has survived despite the hardships of The Depression, economic adversities, and a severe financial crisis in the 1980s. Today with 73 faculty and 1,550 students, Texas Wesleyan remains committed to its original mission that the goal of education is the development of each student to his or her greatest potential. William M. Pearce, born in the woman's dormitory of Seth Ward College in Plainview, Texas, resigned his position as executive vice-president of Texas Technological University to become the thirteenth president of Texas Wesleyan College in June 1968. Upon assuming office, Pearce realized the need to concentrate his efforts on those things in need of repair and improvement. There was no faculty organization, no tenure, no formal budget process, and Texas Wesleyan was lacking many other standards usually found in institutions of higher education. ...
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Personal Value Systems of American and Jordanian Managers: A Cross-Cultural Study

Personal Value Systems of American and Jordanian Managers: A Cross-Cultural Study

Date: May 1990
Creator: Hayajneh, Abdalla F. (Abdalla Farhan)
Description: The objectives of this study are: (1) to explore the personal value systems of Jordanian managers; (2) to examine the relationship between the personal values of Jordanian managers and their behavior (i.e., decision making); and (3) to compare the personal value systems of Jordanian and American managers. To achieve the first and the second objectives, England's (1967) Personal Value Questionnaire (PVQ) and the Behavioral Measurement Questionnaire have been respectively utilized. To achieve the final objective, the behavioral relevance scores derived from this study are compared with those in England's (1975) study. Finally, demographic and organizational data are used to describe the characteristics of Jordanian managers and serve as covariates in the statistical analysis. In reference to the statistical techniques, England's scoring methodology, factor analysis and multiple regression, are used to determine the relationship between the personal value systems of Jordanian managers and their behavior (i.e., decisionmaking). England's (1975) "rule of thumb" (adjusted to 15 percent difference) and the Chisguare test are used to test the significant differences between the personal value systems of the Jordanian and American respondents. The findings of this study are as follows: 1. The primary value orientation of Jordanian managers responding to this study is moralistic ...
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