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Effects of Reflection, Probing and Paradoxical Therapist Responses on Client Self-Acceptance

Effects of Reflection, Probing and Paradoxical Therapist Responses on Client Self-Acceptance

Date: August 1982
Creator: Robertson, Elizabeth A.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Reframing and Self-Control Statements on Loneliness, Depression and Controllability

The Effects of Reframing and Self-Control Statements on Loneliness, Depression and Controllability

Date: August 1983
Creator: Garber, Ronald Alan
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Reinforcement History on Stimulus Control Relations

Effects of Reinforcement History on Stimulus Control Relations

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2000
Creator: Reyes, Fredy
Description: Ray (1969) conducted an experiment on multiple stimulus-response relations and selective attention. Ray's (1969) results suggested that stimulus-response relations function as behavioral units. McIlvane and Dube (1996) indicated that if stimulus-response relations are behavioral units the effects of environmental variables on stimulus-response relations should be similar to the effects of environmental variables on single response topographies. This experiment analyzed the effects of reinforcement history on the probability of stimulus-response relations with differing reinforcement histories. In separate conditions random-ratio schedules of reinforcement were contingent on each of four discriminated responses. To assess the effects of reinforcement, during test conditions stimuli controlling different topographies were present concurrently in composite form. Results show that reinforcement history affects the probability of each response topography and that the association between response topographies and their controlling stimuli tends to remain constant throughout variations in reinforcement probability.
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Effects of Reinforcer Magnitude on a Fixed Time Food Delivery Treatment of Pica

Effects of Reinforcer Magnitude on a Fixed Time Food Delivery Treatment of Pica

Date: August 2010
Creator: Lyon, Nathan Scott
Description: The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of using fixed time schedules with different magnitudes of stimulus delivery as treatment for pica. A functional assessment was conducted, which indicated that pica occurred across experimental conditions and was most frequent in the absence of social stimulation or contingencies. A competing stimulus assessment was then conducted to identify stimuli that could potentially compete with pica during NCR. Subsequently, an evaluation of the effects of reinforcer magnitude on NCR as a treatment of pica was conducted. Treatment results indicated that quantity of reinforcer increased the effectiveness of leaner schedules of reinforcer delivery; however, it was not possible to fade the temporal schedule to one that would have been useful in practice. In addition, limitations and future research are outlined.
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The Effects of Reinforcing Operant Variability on Task Acquisition

The Effects of Reinforcing Operant Variability on Task Acquisition

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Date: December 2002
Creator: Seymour, Kail H.
Description: Neuringer, Deiss, and Olson (2000) was replicated and extended to determine the effect of variability contingencies on task acquisition for twelve 7-9 year old children. Subjects first learned to press a computer's shift keys with increasing response variation. Each subject was then exposed to one of three experimental conditions during which they received a point for target responses. Variability condition subjects received additional points on a variable interval schedule for nontarget responses occurring less than 3% of the time. The any condition subjects received additional points on a variable interval schedule for any nontarget response. Control subjects received points only for target responses. All variability condition and two control subjects learned the target response. All any condition subjects and two control subjects did not.
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The Effects of Relaxation and Imagery on Karate Performance

The Effects of Relaxation and Imagery on Karate Performance

Date: May 1981
Creator: Seabourne, Thomas G.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Religious Attendance on Suicidal Ideation: Examining Potential Mediators of Social Support, Locus of Control, and Substance Abuse

Effects of Religious Attendance on Suicidal Ideation: Examining Potential Mediators of Social Support, Locus of Control, and Substance Abuse

Date: August 2014
Creator: Price, Samantha Danielle
Description: Religion has a well-documented relationship with mental health benefits and has consistently demonstrated an impact on several specific mental health concerns, including suicide, generally finding various religious facets to be inversely associated with suicidal thoughts and behaviors. More specifically, religion has been found to be associated with suicide in a number of ways, including decreased acceptance of suicide, decreased likelihood of suicidal thoughts, decreased likelihood of suicidal attempts, fewer suicide attempts, lower relative risk of suicide, lower suicide rate, and increased reasons for living. Several studies have proposed potential mediators (e.g., social support, locus of control, and substance abuse) of the relationship between religion and mental health, usually in non-clinical samples. The current study sought to examine the association between religious attendance and suicidal ideation using archival data of a clinical sample collected from the University of North Texas Psychology Clinic. Results from this sample revealed no evidence of mediation, instead suggesting a direct effect of religious attendance on suicidal ideation. Two mediation models demonstrated the effects of external locus of control and social support on suicidal ideation. These models are discussed in terms of their directionality, considering the extant research on these associations. Findings of the current study have ...
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The Effects of Residual Gases on the Field Emission Properties of ZnO, GaN, ZnS Nanostructures, and the Effects of Light on the Resistivity of Graphene

The Effects of Residual Gases on the Field Emission Properties of ZnO, GaN, ZnS Nanostructures, and the Effects of Light on the Resistivity of Graphene

Date: May 2014
Creator: Mo, Yudong
Description: In this dissertation, I present that at a vacuum of 3×10-7 Torr, residual O2, CO2, H2 and Ar exposure do not significantly degrade the field emission (FE) properties of ZnO nanorods, but N2 exposure significantly does. I propose that this could be due to the dissociation of N2 into atomic nitrogen species and the reaction of such species with ZnO. I also present the effects of O2, CO2, H2O, N2, H2, and Ar residual gas exposure on the FE properties of GaN and ZnS nanostructure. A brief review of growth of ZnO, GaN and ZnS is provided. In addition, Cs deposition on GaN nanostructures at ultra-high vacuum results in 30% decrease in turn-on voltage and 60% in work function. The improvement in FE properties could be due to a Cs-induced space-charge layer at the surface that reduces the barrier for FE and lowers the work function. I describe a new phenomenon, in which the resistivity of CVD-grown graphene increases to a higher saturated value under light exposure, and depends on the wavelength of the light—the shorter the wavelength, the higher the resistivity. First-principle calculations and theoretical analysis based on density functional theory show that (1) a water molecule close to ...
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The Effects of Response Restriction on Non-Socially Maintained Self-Injury

The Effects of Response Restriction on Non-Socially Maintained Self-Injury

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2003
Creator: Blevins, Travis
Description: This study examined the effects of response restriction (blocking and protective equipment) on subsequent durations of self-injury with two female participants with developmental disabilities. First, a functional analysis was conducted with each participant to identify potential maintaining variables of the self-injury. Second, access to the response was systematically restricted in a multiple schedule restriction paradigm. A baseline extended alone was conducted without the restriction component in place as a control condition. For one participant the results suggested that response restriction may have increased subsequent durations of responding once the restriction element was removed. For a second participant responding did not appear to be affected by the restriction component.
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The Effects of Restricting the Response Space and Self-evaluation on Letter Quality in Beginning and Experienced Handwriters.

The Effects of Restricting the Response Space and Self-evaluation on Letter Quality in Beginning and Experienced Handwriters.

Date: December 2001
Creator: LePage, Julia
Description: This study analyzed the effects of restricting the response space and selfevaluation on students' handwriting quality in two beginning handwriters and two experienced handwriters. Students executed letters with and without using a transparent overlay, in a multiple-baseline-across-letters design. The use of the transparent overlay included drawing letters in a space restricted by the transparency; overlaying a model letter on top of the written letter and; evaluating if the two letters matched. Letter quality immediately improved when overlays were used, and handwriting quality maintained when the writing response was not restricted by the overlay transparency. Prompting and feedback were delivered contingent on on-task behavior. Analysis was based on three different measurement systems.
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Effects of Ribavirin on Normal Rat Kidney Cells and Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts Infected with Rous Sarcoma Virus

Effects of Ribavirin on Normal Rat Kidney Cells and Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts Infected with Rous Sarcoma Virus

Date: April 1979
Creator: Jenkins, Frank J.
Description: Ribavirin, a synthetic nucleoside, was found to inhibit the replication of Rous sarcoma viruses (RSV) and subsequent cell transformation in chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF). It also blocked the transformation of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells infected with temperature-sensitive mutants of RSV. The action of Ribavirin was found to be reversible as removal of the drug from the NRK cells reversed the effects on cell transformation. Ribavirin appears to have a static effect on cell growth of both NRK and CEF cells. In addition, guanosine, xanthosine and inosine altered the effect of Ribavirin on cell growth.
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The Effects of Rotation Around Two Axes of the Body Upon Static Balance

The Effects of Rotation Around Two Axes of the Body Upon Static Balance

Date: August 1967
Creator: Gill, Sherry A.
Description: The problem of this study was to investigate the effect of the rotation around two axes of the body upon static balance as measured by the stork stand, the headstand, and the one foot balance.
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The Effects of School Performance on the Self-Concept and Locus of Control of Learning Disabled and Emotionally Disturbed Elementary Students

The Effects of School Performance on the Self-Concept and Locus of Control of Learning Disabled and Emotionally Disturbed Elementary Students

Date: May 1984
Creator: Ronalder, Ronnie Lee
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Sedative and Tonic Music on Sterotyped Behaviors in Institutionalized Mental Defectives

The Effects of Sedative and Tonic Music on Sterotyped Behaviors in Institutionalized Mental Defectives

Date: May 1971
Creator: Petty, Marshall L.
Description: Stereotyped behavior in profoundly retarded subjects was observed under sedative and tonic music, with time and movement measures of responding.
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The Effects of Selected Algicides and Some Coordination Complexes upon the Apparent Photosynthesis of Chlorella Pyrenoidosa

The Effects of Selected Algicides and Some Coordination Complexes upon the Apparent Photosynthesis of Chlorella Pyrenoidosa

Date: June 1965
Creator: Phelps, Robert G.
Description: Many experiments have been performed with the Warburg apparatus, or variations of this manometric technique, since Warburg's experiments (52, 53) where the effects of cyanides upon dark reactions and of urethanes upon light reactions of photosynthesis were demonstrated. The same basic techniques were utilized in this research in attempting to determine the effects of some coordination complexes upon the apparent photosynthetic rate of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. A second goal of the present paper was to investigate the potential of the Warburg apparatus as a tool for screening algicidal compounds.
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The Effects of Selected Auditory Stimulation upon Learning Typewriting

The Effects of Selected Auditory Stimulation upon Learning Typewriting

Date: June 1962
Creator: Lemaster, Arthur James, 1933-
Description: The problem of this study was to determine the effects of typewriting practice with selected auditory stimulation on student achievement in typewriting. It included the following sub-problems: 1. Determining the extent to which typewriting practice with selected auditory stimulation affected ability to compose at the typewriter. 2. Determining the extent to which typewriting practice with selected auditory stimulation affected ability to typewrite from dictation. 3. Determining the extent to which typewriting practice with selected auditory stimulation affected ability to typewrite from copy.
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Effects of Selected Phytohormones on the Growth and Morphology of Escherichia Coli

Effects of Selected Phytohormones on the Growth and Morphology of Escherichia Coli

Date: January 1968
Creator: Little, Lynn Mallory
Description: The present investigation was undertaken as a preliminary study to learn the response of Escherichia coli cells grown under identical experimental conditions to various concentrations of indoleacetic acid, gibberellic acid, and kinetin alone, and in combination with one another.
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The Effects of Selection Risk on Sex Discrimination in Employment Decisions

The Effects of Selection Risk on Sex Discrimination in Employment Decisions

Date: May 1979
Creator: McKenna, David John
Description: Effects of selection risk on sex discrimination in hiring were investigated. Ninety-six male and female educational administration graduate students rated ficticious resumes on suitability for hiring for the female-oriented position of secondary school teacher. Sex and selection risk level were varied, with sex of rater as an assigned factor. Analysis of variance yielded significant main effects for sex (p < .01) and selection risk level (p < .05). All ratings were lower in high selection-risk situations, with males preferred over females across both levels of risk. Results suggested that ratings were based on a stereotype of female inferiority in work efficiency, overriding job sex-orientation as a decision factor.
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The Effects of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (Ssri) on Auditory Measures in Clinically Depressed Subjects.

The Effects of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (Ssri) on Auditory Measures in Clinically Depressed Subjects.

Date: May 2002
Creator: Goodale, Elizabeth S.
Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medication on auditory skills in clinically depressed subjects. Experimental subjects prescribed an SSRI were tested in a medicated and an unmedicated condition, and the test results were compared. Furthermore, the experimental group was compared with a control group consisting of normal subjects. Test measures included pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, acoustic reflex thresholds, and auditory electrophysiologic measures such as auditory brainstem and auditory late responses. An assessment scale for depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II) was also used. Results indicated statistically significant differences for the BDI-II between the control and experimental groups for both conditions. Electrophysiologic measures indicated a significantly shorter latency for auditory late potential P1 at 55 dBnSL, and a significantly larger amplitude at 45 dBnSL for the N1/P2 component for the unmedicated group. Although the other measures showed trends, they did not reach significance.
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The Effects of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) on Auditory Measures in Women

The Effects of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) on Auditory Measures in Women

Date: May 2002
Creator: Briley, Kelly Anne
Description: This study examined the relationship between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medication and auditory measures in clinically depressed women. Experimental subjects were tested in both a medicated and unmedicated condition. Experimental subjects were compared to a normal control group; additionally intrasubject comparison was made within the experimental group. Test measures included: audiometry, tympanometry, otoacoustic emissions, uncomfortable loudness level, masking level difference, SCAN-A, Synthetic Sentence Identification (SSI), and the low predictability section of the Revised Speech in noise (RSPIN). The unmedicated group scored significantly less favorably than the control group on the following tests; SCAN-A (composite, filtered words, and auditory figure ground), R-SPIN (0MCR condition in both the right and left ears). Additionally, the unmedicated group scored significantly less favorably than the medicated group on the SSI (-20MCR condition right ear only) and of the R-SPIN (0MCR condition right ear only). Other test measures indicated consistent trends but did reach significance.
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The Effects of Self-evaluation and Response Restriction on Letter and Number Reversal in Young Children.

The Effects of Self-evaluation and Response Restriction on Letter and Number Reversal in Young Children.

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Date: August 2004
Creator: Strickland, Monica Kathleen
Description: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a training package consisting of response restriction and the reinforcement of self-evaluation on letter reversal errors. Participants were 3 typically developing boys between the age of 5 and 7. The results indicated that the training package was successful in correcting reversals in the absence of a model during training and on application tests. These improvements maintained during subsequent follow-up sessions and generalized across trainers. Fading was not always necessary in correcting reversals, but was effective in correcting reversals that persisted during the overlay training procedures. The advantages to implementing a systematic intervention for reducing letter reversal errors in the classroom, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.
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The Effects of Self-Monitoring and Health Locus of Control on Improvement in a Work Hardening Program

The Effects of Self-Monitoring and Health Locus of Control on Improvement in a Work Hardening Program

Date: May 1989
Creator: Liedtke-Hendrickson, Valette
Description: This study examined the effects of self-monitoring behavior and health locus of control on improvement in a work hardening program. The subjects included 22 male and 18 female outpatients in a hospital-based rehabilitation program. Subjects were classified as having an internal or external health locus of control, and were randomly assigned to either a self-monitoring or a non-self-monitoring group. Improvement was assessed via objective performance data and self-ratings of perceived improvement. The results indicated that individuals identified as having an internal health locus of control did not show greater gains in physical functioning or perceived improvement relative to externally oriented individuals. Additionally, those subjects participating in self-monitoring activities were no different from non-self-monitoring subjects in terms of improvement in exercise activities or perceived improvement. The results also indicated no interaction between health locus of control and the presence or absence of self-monitoring. It was suggested that other factors such as workman's compensation, pain patient characteristics, low self-concept, and severe stress may have proved more powerful influences on patient improvement than internal health locus of control or self-monitoring. It was also suggested that rehabilitation programs might benefit from creating structured environments in which patients receive frequent staff feedback and reinforcement for ...
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Effects of Self-Monitoring and Monetary Reward on Fluid Adherence among Adult Hemodialysis Patients

Effects of Self-Monitoring and Monetary Reward on Fluid Adherence among Adult Hemodialysis Patients

Date: December 2000
Creator: Sonnier, Bridget L.
Description: The effects of a monetary reward and self-monitoring on reducing interdialytic weight gain (IWG) were compared for 6 hemodialysis patients in an outpatient setting. A single-subject experimental design (A-B-BC-B-BC) was used to examine each variable individually and in combination, with alternating phases to control for possible sequencing effects. Monetary reward (50 cents - $3) was administered in a titrated manner according to standardized criteria, ranging from 3 % and 4% of patients' dry weight on weekdays and weekends, respectively, to 3.5% and 4.5% for weekdays and weekends. Self-monitoring involved recording daily fluid and diet intake. Results indicated that by the end of the treatment program, the 6 participants averaged a 14% reduction in weekday IWG and a 15.45% reduction in weekend IWG; however, due to significant variability, it cannot be concluded that the reductions are treatment effects. Four out of 6 participants reduced their average IWG for both weekends and weekdays by .75 kg (1.65 lb.). The average weekend reduction for these 4 participants was .85 kg (1.87 lbs.) while the average weekday reduction was .65 kg (1.43 lb.). All 6 participants showed reductions in weekday IWG that averaged .53 kg (1.17 lb.). However, only 2 participants demonstrated IWG reductions ...
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The Effects of Self-Recording and Projected Levels of Aspiration Upon Competitive Swimming Performance

The Effects of Self-Recording and Projected Levels of Aspiration Upon Competitive Swimming Performance

Date: August 1976
Creator: Hamlett, Laurie Ray
Description: The purposes of the study were to determine the effects of self-recording techniques upon competitive swimming times, to determine the relationship between stated level of aspiration and subsequent performance, and to determine the influence of success or failure upon stated levels of aspiration. Subjects were fifteen female high-school competitive swimmers. Five subjects utilized self-recording techniques and projected levels of aspiration; ten subjects did not. Data were analyzed by analysis of covariance and by regression analysis. Alpha was .05. Conclusions of this study were that self-recording techniques do not significantly affect competitive swimming times, that a strong relationship exists between stated level of aspiration and subsequent performance, and that successful and unsuccessful performances generate increases in stated levels of aspiration.
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