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The Effects of Parental Substance Abuse on the Behavior of School Children

The Effects of Parental Substance Abuse on the Behavior of School Children

Date: May 1993
Creator: Prelow, Hazel
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Parenting on Marital Quality: A Causal Analysis

Effects of Parenting on Marital Quality: A Causal Analysis

Date: August 1984
Creator: Otero de Sabogal, Regina
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Parenting Stress and Academic Self-Concept on Reading Ability in a Clinic Referral Sample

The Effects of Parenting Stress and Academic Self-Concept on Reading Ability in a Clinic Referral Sample

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Maldonado, Michele L.
Description: This study investigated the relationships among the variables of parenting stress, academic self-concept, and reading ability. The purpose of this study was to determine whether parenting stress and academic self-concept contributed to the child's reading ability. Two hypotheses were investigated in an effort to accomplish this purpose. The subjects used in this study were forty-nine children and their primary caretakers referred to The Child and Family Resource Center, The University of North Texas, Denton, Texas, during the academic years of 1994 through 1999. Subjects ranged in age from seven to eighteen years of age. Academically, the subjects ranged from first graders through eleventh graders. All subjects lived in and attended schools in Denton County or neighboring counties. Parental employment ranged from unskilled laborers to medical doctors. The participating families included biological, step, adoptive, single, and divorced families. Abidin's Parenting Stress Index was used to measure parental stress experienced by the primary caretaker. The Intellectual and School Status cluster of the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale was used to measure the child's academic self-concept and the Woodcock Reading Mastery Test-Revised provided a measure of the child's reading ability. Test scores were obtained following a review of The Child and Family Resource Center's ...
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The Effects of Participation in a Buddy System on the Self-Concept, Academic Achievement, Attrition Rate, and Congruence Level of Community College Developmental Studies Students

The Effects of Participation in a Buddy System on the Self-Concept, Academic Achievement, Attrition Rate, and Congruence Level of Community College Developmental Studies Students

Date: December 1985
Creator: Cinclair, Carol
Description: This dissertation sought to determine the effects of a buddy system on a student's self-concept, academic achievement, attrition rate, and congruence levels. The buddy system treatment randomly paired two students for the purposes of sharing ideas, working on assignments, getting to know each other, and supporting one another. The study included three randomly selected sections of pre-college level, developmental writing classes from the Brookhaven College of the Dallas County Community College District. Three other classes served as the control group, and one instructor taught all six sections of the course. Three instruments were used as measures of change: the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (TSCS), designed by William H. Fitts, measured self-concept levels; the Personality and Educational Environment Scale (PEES), created by Roger Boshier, measured congruence levels; and a written paragraph measured achievement levels in English. Attrition percentages were based on the number of students enrolled during the second week of class who were not present during the sixteenth week of class. To test for significance, an analysis of covariance procedure was used on the TSCS, PEES, and written paragraph results, and a test for the difference between proportions for independent groups was used on the attrition percentages. The class sections were ...
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The Effects of Participation in the BASICS Program on the Self-Concept, Experimental Beliefs, Dogmatism, and Pupil Control Ideology of In-Service Elementary School Teachers

The Effects of Participation in the BASICS Program on the Self-Concept, Experimental Beliefs, Dogmatism, and Pupil Control Ideology of In-Service Elementary School Teachers

Date: December 1975
Creator: Afolayan, Abel O.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Participation in the Taba In-Service Education Program on Teachers' Self Concept, Attitude, and Selected Personality Characteristics

Effects of Participation in the Taba In-Service Education Program on Teachers' Self Concept, Attitude, and Selected Personality Characteristics

Date: August 1971
Creator: Bennett, Margaret Ann, 1926-
Description: The problem of this study was to evaluate the effects of participation in the Hilda Taba In-Service Education Program on teachers' self concept, attitude, and selected personality characteristics.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Partner Violence and Psychological Abuse on Women's Mental Health Over Time.

Effects of Partner Violence and Psychological Abuse on Women's Mental Health Over Time.

Date: August 2006
Creator: Temple, Jeff R.
Description: This study examined the distinct effects of partner violence and psychological abuse on women's mental health over time. Latent growth modeling was used to examine stability and change over time, evaluating the course and consequences of each form of abuse. The size of women's social support network was examined as a mediator. The sample consisted of 835 African American, Euro-American, and Mexican American low-income women. Participants who completed Waves 1, 2, 3, and 5 were included in the study (n = 585). In general, partner violence decreased over time for all groups, while psychological abuse decreased over time for only Euro-American women. Whereas initial and prolonged exposure to psychological abuse was related to and directly impacted women's mental health, partner violence was only related to initial levels of mental health. Surprisingly, social support was only related to initial violence and distress and had no impact on the rate of change over time. These results have important implications for researchers and health care professionals. First, differences in the pattern of results were found for each ethnic group, reaffirming the notion that counselors and researchers must be sensitive to multicultural concerns in both assessment and intervention. For example, psychological abuse had a ...
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The Effects of PECS Training on Symbolic Matching Skills in Learners with Autism

The Effects of PECS Training on Symbolic Matching Skills in Learners with Autism

Date: May 2009
Creator: Cranmer, Elizabeth
Description: This study evaluated whether picture exchange communication system (PECS) training would result in the development of conditional relations among corresponding pictures, objects (reinforcers) and spoken words used in PECS training with learners with developmental disabilities. Three participants with autism and mental retardation were trained to use PECS. Match-to-sample procedures were used to assess all possible conditional relations among stimuli before, during, and after PECS training. None of the three participants in this study acquired conditional discriminations involving the pictures, reinforcers, and spoken words used in their PECS training.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Perceived Locus of Control and Dispositional Optimism on Chronic Pain Treatment Outcomes.

The Effects of Perceived Locus of Control and Dispositional Optimism on Chronic Pain Treatment Outcomes.

Date: December 2004
Creator: Worsham, Scott L.
Description: The financial cost for health care and lost productivity due to chronic pain has been estimated at over $70 billion per year. Researchers have attempted to discover the psychosocial and personality factors that discriminate between people who learn to cope well with chronic pain and those who have difficulty adjusting. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of perceived locus of control and dispositional optimism on chronic pain treatment outcomes. Subjects reported significantly lower post-treatment pain levels as compared with pre-treatment levels (M = 0.66, SD = 1.58), t(45) = 2.85, p = .007 (two-tailed), but decreased pain was not associated with scores on the internality dimension of the Pain Locus of Control Scale (PLOC) or on the Life Orientation Test-Revised (LOT-R) (a measure of dispositional optimism). Overall, participants' increased coping ability was associated with scores on the LOT-R, but not with scores on the internality dimension of the PLOC. Subjects with the lowest pre-treatment scores on the LOT-R demonstrated significantly greater increases in post-treatment coping ability than those with the highest scores (F(2,40) = 3.93, p < .03). Participants with the highest pre-treatment scores on both the PLOC internality dimension and the LOT-R demonstrated greater ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Perceived Quality, Product Category Similarity, and Brand Breadth on Consumers' Perceptions of Brand Extensions: Tests of Categorization Theory and Cognitive Response Theory

Effects of Perceived Quality, Product Category Similarity, and Brand Breadth on Consumers' Perceptions of Brand Extensions: Tests of Categorization Theory and Cognitive Response Theory

Date: August 1994
Creator: Lee, Dongdae
Description: Various constructs are related to predicting consumers' perceptions of brand extensions. Among these, three constructs, perceptions of perceived quality (PQ) associated with the parent brand, product category similarity (PCS) of an extension to its parent brand, and brand breadth (BB) of the parent, are central to many brand extension studies. The purpose of this study is to clarify the roles of these three constructs and to pit predictions from an alternative theoretical perspective — cognitive response theory — against predictions based on categorization theory.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Perceived Sex-Appropriateness of a Task on Performance of Selected Sports Skills

The Effects of Perceived Sex-Appropriateness of a Task on Performance of Selected Sports Skills

Date: May 1983
Creator: Harris, Victoria L.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Perceptual Motor Enrichment Upon a Six Year Old with Cerebellar Brain Damage

The Effects of Perceptual Motor Enrichment Upon a Six Year Old with Cerebellar Brain Damage

Date: August 1986
Creator: Shepardson, Nina F. (Nina Fredrica)
Description: This study involved the effects of a perceptual motor enrichment program upon the motor skills of a six year old boy with cerebellar brain damage, who, with a control group of ten normal six year olds, was given a pre-test of motor skills. He and a child from the control group participated in a perceptual-motor enrichment program. The motor skills of both subjects were tested halfway through the program. Following the program, the experimental child, the control child, and the control group were post-tested on their motor skills. The testings showed that the greatest gains in motor skills were obtained by the experimental child, followed by the control child. The control group displayed little increase in motor skill performance.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Performance Levels of Subject Matter Experts on Job Analysis Outcomes

Effects of Performance Levels of Subject Matter Experts on Job Analysis Outcomes

Date: December 1997
Creator: Boyd, Charlotte Friedersdorff
Description: Much research has been undertaken to determine how Subject Matter Expert characteristics affect job analysis outcomes. The current study seeks to discover if performance levels are related to current incumbents ratings of their positions. A group of 114 corporate associates, from two administrative positions, served as Subject Matter Experts (SME) for this study. Separate job analyses for each position were conducted using the Job Analysis Task Checklist. The results for each job were analyzed to determine if SME performance levels affected job analysis outcomes. The results for both jobs showed that there were very few differences in job analysis results as a function of SME performance levels.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Peripheral Nerve Injury on the Cells of the Dorsal Root Ganglion: a Role for Primary Cilia

Effects of Peripheral Nerve Injury on the Cells of the Dorsal Root Ganglion: a Role for Primary Cilia

Date: December 2012
Creator: Smith, Sarah K.
Description: Primary cilia are ubiquitous sensory organelles found on most cell types including cells of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The DRG are groups of peripheral neurons that relay sensory information from the periphery to the CNS. Other cell types in the DRG include a type of glial cell, the satellite glial cells (SGCs). The SGCs surround the DRG neurons and, with the neurons, form functional sensory units. Currently are no reports describing the numbers of DRG cells that have cilia. We found that 26% of the SGCs had primary cilia. The incidence of cilia on neurons varied with neuron size, a property that roughly correlates with physiological characteristics. We found that 29% of the small, 16% of the medium and 5% of the large neurons had primary cilia. Primary cilia have been shown to have a role in cell proliferation in a variety of cell types. In some of the cells the cilia mediate the proliferative effects of Sonic hedgehog (Shh). In the CNS, Shh signaling through primary cilia affects proliferation during development as well as following injury, but no studies have looked at this function in the PNS. The SGCs and neurons of the DRG undergo complex changes following ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of pH and Substrate on Growth of Escherichia Coli and Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Mixed Continuous Culture

Effects of pH and Substrate on Growth of Escherichia Coli and Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Mixed Continuous Culture

Date: January 1964
Creator: Cooper, Billy Howard
Description: The express purpose for doing this project was to develop methods for the continuous culture of E. coli and P. aeruginosa as a mixed population, and to apply these methods in studying the effects of pH and substrate upon the growth of these two organisms in mixed continuous culture.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Physical Exertion on Immediate Classroom Mental Performance of Second-Grade Elementary School Children

The Effects of Physical Exertion on Immediate Classroom Mental Performance of Second-Grade Elementary School Children

Date: December 1977
Creator: Gabbard, Carl P.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Phytohormones on Scenedesmus quadricauda

Effects of Phytohormones on Scenedesmus quadricauda

Date: 1977
Creator: Alam, Mohammad Ihtisham
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Picture Exchange Training on Communication Topographies

Effects of Picture Exchange Training on Communication Topographies

Date: May 2009
Creator: Haray, Aimee H.
Description: The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) has been used with children with autism and other developmental disabilities as an alternative to vocal communication. Some researchers have reported rapid acquisition of picture-exchange requesting as well as increased vocal speech and increased spontaneous social interactions following PECS training. Earlier research has found that although 3 children with autism learned to exchange pictures for preferred items during PECS training, requesting topographies did not change and vocal speech did not increase after PECS training. The present study evaluated the effects of PECS training on requesting topographies, especially vocal speech, with 3 participants with autism and mental retardation. Only one participant maintained picture-exchange requesting, and none of the participants showed an increase in vocal speech during probe sessions conducted after each PECS training phase.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Plasma, Temperature and Chemical Reactions on Porous Low Dielectric Films for Semiconductor Devices

Effects of Plasma, Temperature and Chemical Reactions on Porous Low Dielectric Films for Semiconductor Devices

Date: December 2010
Creator: Osei-Yiadom, Eric
Description: Low-dielectric (k) films are one of the performance drivers for continued scaling of integrated circuit devices. These films are needed in microelectronic device interconnects to lower power consumption and minimize cross talk between metal lines that "interconnect" transistors. Low-k materials currently in production for the 45 and 65 nm node are most often organosilicate glasses (OSG) with dielectric constants near 2.8 and nominal porosities of 8-10%. The next generation of low-k materials will require k values 2.6 and below for the 45 nm device generation and beyond. The continuous decrease in device dimensions in ultra large scale integrated (ULSI) circuits have brought about the replacement of the silicon dioxide interconnect dielectric (ILD), which has a dielectric constant (k) of approximately 4.1, with low dielectric constant materials. Lowering the dielectric constant reduces the propagation delays, RC constant (R = the resistance of the metal lines; C = the line capacitance), and metal cross-talk between wires. In order to reduce the RC constants, a number of low-k materials have been studied for use as intermetal dielectrics. The k values of these dielectric materials can be lowered by replacing oxide films with carbon-based polymer films, incorporating hydrocarbon functional groups into oxide films (SiOCH ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Play Therapy on the Social and Psychological Adjustment of Five-to-Nine-Year Old Children

The Effects of Play Therapy on the Social and Psychological Adjustment of Five-to-Nine-Year Old Children

Date: August 1975
Creator: Barrett, Della
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Positive Behavioral Supports in Schools since the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997 based on 2001 SLIIDEA Data

The Effects of Positive Behavioral Supports in Schools since the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997 based on 2001 SLIIDEA Data

Date: August 2009
Creator: Miller, Cindy
Description: Congress in 1997 recognized that there were some issues and concerns that had emerged surrounding the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and sought to address these issues and concerns by mandating a national evaluation on the implementation and progress toward improving outcomes for students with disabilities. The Study of the State and Local Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act was designed to address how the amendments of IDEA were being implemented by states, school districts, and schools. This mixed methods study examined the first year of data collected from the six-year Study of the State and Local Implementation of IDEA (SLIIDEA) and analyzing 20 case studies that used interviews of special education personnel and principals, conducted at the local school level. Data from the national survey were examined in light of findings from the case studies. The case studies brought out the varying opinions on implementation success at the local level. Further case studies for each year of the study would be helpful in determining the level of implementation locally and the significant insights of local school personnel on whether these initiatives have worked.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Positive Emotion, Negative Emotion, Flourishing, and Languishing on Cardiovascular Risk

The Effects of Positive Emotion, Negative Emotion, Flourishing, and Languishing on Cardiovascular Risk

Date: August 2010
Creator: Purdum, Michael B.
Description: Positive psychology has led a movement that concentrates on positive characteristics. The current study examined the relationship between positive emotions, negative emotions, flourishing, languishing, and cardiovascular functioning. The study uses guided imagery to help participants recall a negative emotional event and positive emotional event in a counterbalanced order. The reverse order allowed us to examine the differential contributions of stress buffering versus facilitated recovery effects to higher levels of heart rate variability (HRV). The study also examined the relationship between mental health categories and known cardiovascular disease risk. Univariate analysis of variance revealed that positive emotions can serve as a stress buffer and dampen cardiovascular responses to a negative event. Also, analysis revealed a trend for the prediction that positive emotions can facilitate cardiovascular recovery following a negative event. Exploratory analysis did not reveal differences between a facilitated recovery group and a buffering group for cardiovascular measures. Future studies should include tighter control to help compare the differential influences of stress facilitation and stress buffering on cardiovascular functioning. The results from the study indicate that it is still too early to tell whether mental health buffers those individuals from developing CVD, and to answer whether languishing increases the risk of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Positive Reinforcement on the Self-Concept of Children in a Classroom

The Effects of Positive Reinforcement on the Self-Concept of Children in a Classroom

Date: August 1974
Creator: Kalish, Robert B.
Description: This study tests whether positive reinforcement consisting of a positive word, eye contact, and a smile would improve the self-concept of students. Sixty boys and girls in two sixth-grade classes were given an adaptation of Gordon's, How I See Myself scale. A baseline consisting of positive reinforcements given by the teacher to the students was taken. Then a positive reinforcement schedule was instituted by the sixth-grade teacher. The experimental group of thirty students received a mean of 24.78 positive reinforcements per class; the control group received a mean of 1.1 positive reinforcements. The subjects were again given the HISM scale, and no significant score differences were found between the experimental group and control group.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Positive Verbal Reinforcement on the Four Underlying Factors in Intrinsic Motivation

Effects of Positive Verbal Reinforcement on the Four Underlying Factors in Intrinsic Motivation

Date: August 1993
Creator: Prentice, Ray
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries