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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: Biochemistry
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Metabolic Engineering of Raffinose-Family Oligosaccharides in the Phloem Reveals Alterations in Patterns of Carbon Partitioning and Enhances Resistance to Green Peach Aphid

Metabolic Engineering of Raffinose-Family Oligosaccharides in the Phloem Reveals Alterations in Patterns of Carbon Partitioning and Enhances Resistance to Green Peach Aphid

Date: August 2010
Creator: Cao, Te
Description: Phloem transport is along hydrostatic pressure gradients generated by differences in solute concentration between source and sink tissues. Numerous species accumulate raffinose-family oligosaccharides (RFOs) in the phloem of mature leaves to accentuate the pressure gradient between source and sinks. In this study, metabolic engineering was used to generate RFOs at the inception of the translocation stream of Arabidopsis thaliana, which transports predominantly sucrose. To do this, three genes, GALACTINOL SYNTHASE, RAFFINOSE SYNTHASE and STACHYOSE SYNTHASE, were expressed from promoters specific to the companion cells of minor veins. Two transgenic lines homozygous for all three genes (GRS63 and GRS47) were selected for further analysis. Sugars were extracted and quantified by high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), and 21-day old plants of both lines had levels of galactinol, raffinose, and stachyose approaching 50% of total soluble sugar. All three exotic sugars were also identified in phloem exudates from excised leaves of transgenic plants whereas levels were negligible in exudates from wild type leaves. Differences in starch accumulation or degradation between wild type and GRS63 and GRS47 lines were not observed. Similarly, there were no differences in vegetative growth between wild type and engineered plants, but engineered plants flowered ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Gene Expression Profiling of the nip Mutant in Medicago truncatula

Gene Expression Profiling of the nip Mutant in Medicago truncatula

Date: August 2007
Creator: McKethan, Brandon Lee
Description: The study of root nodule symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and leguminous plant species is important because of the ability to supplement fixed nitrogen fertilizers and increase plant growth in poor soils. Our group has isolated a mutant called nip in the model legume Medicago truncatula that is defective in nodule symbiosis. The nip mutant (numerous infections with polyphenolics) becomes infected by Sinorhizobium meliloti but then accumulates polyphenolic defense compounds in the nodule and fails to progress to a stage where nitrogen fixation can occur. Analysis of the transcriptome of nip roots prior to inoculation with rhizobia was undertaken using Affymetric Medicago Genome Array microarrays. The total RNA of 5-day old uninoculated seedlings was analyzed in triplicate to screen for the NIP gene based on downregulated transcript levels in the mutant as compared to wild type. Further microarray data was generated from 10 days post inoculation (dpi) nip and wild type plants. Analysis of the most highly downregulated transcripts revealed that the NIP gene was not identifiable based on transcript level. Putative gene function was assigned to transcripts with altered expression patterns in order to characterize the nip mutation phenotypically as inferred from the transcriptome. Functional analysis revealed a large number ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Fluorescence labeling and computational analysis of the strut of myosin's 50 kDa cleft.

Fluorescence labeling and computational analysis of the strut of myosin's 50 kDa cleft.

Date: August 2007
Creator: Gawalapu, Ravi Kumar
Description: In order to understand the structural changes in myosin S1, fluorescence polarization and computational dynamics simulations were used. Dynamics simulations on the S1 motor domain indicated that significant flexibility was present throughout the molecular model. The constrained opening versus closing of the 50 kDa cleft appeared to induce opposite directions of movement in the lever arm. A sequence called the "strut" which traverses the 50 kDa cleft and may play an important role in positioning the actomyosin binding interface during actin binding is thought to be intimately linked to distant structural changes in the myosin's nucleotide cleft and neck regions. To study the dynamics of the strut region, a method of fluorescent labeling of the strut was discovered using the dye CY3. CY3 served as a hydrophobic tag for purification by hydrophobic interaction chromatography which enabled the separation of labeled and unlabeled species of S1 including a fraction labeled specifically at the strut sequence. The high specificity of labeling was verified by proteolytic digestions, gel electrophoresis, and mass spectroscopy. Analysis of the labeled S1 by collisional quenching, fluorescence polarization, and actin-activated ATPase activity were consistent with predictions from structural models of the probe's location. Although the fluorescent intensity of the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Tobacco Phospholipase D β1: Molecular Cloning and Biochemical Characterization

Tobacco Phospholipase D β1: Molecular Cloning and Biochemical Characterization

Date: December 2002
Creator: Hodson, Jane E.
Description: Transgenic tobacco plants were developed containing a partial PLD clone in antisense orientation. The PLD isoform targeted by the insertion was identified. A PLD clone was isolated from a cDNA library using the partial PLD as a probe: Nt10B1 shares 92% identity with PLDβ1 from tomato but lacks the C2 domain. PCR analysis confirmed insertion of the antisense fragment into the plants: three introns distinguished the endogenous gene from the transgene. PLD activity was assayed in leaf homogenates in PLDβ/g conditions. When phosphatidylcholine was utilized as a substrate, no significant difference in transphosphatidylation activity was observed. However, there was a reduction in NAPE hydrolysis in extracts of two transgenic plants. In one of these, a reduction in elicitor- induced PAL expression was also observed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Functional Characterization of Plant Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolases

Functional Characterization of Plant Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolases

Date: December 2010
Creator: Kim, Sang-Chul
Description: Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) terminates the endocannabinoid signaling pathway that regulates numerous neurobehavioral processes in animals by hydrolyzing a class of lipid mediators, N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). Recent identification of an Arabidopsis FAAH homologue (AtFAAH) and several studies, especially those using AtFAAH overexpressing and knock-out lines suggest that a FAAH-mediated pathway exists in plants for the metabolism of endogenous NAEs. Here, I provide evidence to support this concept by identifying candidate FAAH cDNA sequences in diverse plant species. NAE amidohydrolase assays confirmed that several of the proteins encoded by these cDNAs indeed catalyzed the hydrolysis of NAEs in vitro. Kinetic parameters, inhibition properties, and substrate specificities of the plant FAAH enzymes were very similar to those of mammalian FAAH. Five amino acid residues determined to be important for catalysis by rat FAAH were absolutely conserved within the plant FAAH sequences. Site-directed mutation of each of the five putative catalytic residues in AtFAAH abolished its hydrolytic activity when expressed in Escherichia coli. Contrary to overexpression of native AtFAAH in Arabidopsis that results in enhanced seedling growth, and in seedlings that were insensitive to exogenous NAE, overexpression of the inactive AtFAAH mutants showed no growth enhancement and no NAE tolerance. However, both active ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
O-Acetylserine Sulhydralase-A from Salmonella typhimurium LT-2: Thermodynamic Properties and SPectral Identification of Intermediates

O-Acetylserine Sulhydralase-A from Salmonella typhimurium LT-2: Thermodynamic Properties and SPectral Identification of Intermediates

Date: August 1993
Creator: Simmons, James Walter
Description: O-Acetylserine Sulfhydrylase (OASS) is a pyridoxal phosphate enzyme that catalyzes the reaction of O-acetyl-Lserine with sulfide to give L-cysteine. OASS is present as two isoforms, designated -A and -B. The kinetic mechanism of OASS-A is well known and there is also much known concerning the acid-base chemistry of the enzyme. However, little is known concerning the location of the rate determining steps, the sequencing of chemical steps that occur at the active site, or the nature of the rate determining transition states. The studies performed to help elucidate these aspects of the OASS-A mechanism included determination of the thermodynamics of both half reactions, along with studies utilizing substrate analogs of OAS halting the reaction at specific points along the reaction pathway allowing the identification of reaction intermediates. The free energy change of the first half reaction was shown to be -5.7 Kcal/mole while the second half reaction was shown to be, for all intents and purposes, irreversible. Intermediates along the reaction pathway that have been previously identified include the internal Schiff base and the a-aminoacrylate. The external Schiff base was identified using the analogs cysteine, alanine, and glycine while the geminal diamine was identified using the analog serine. Formation of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Molecular and Functional Characterization of Medicago Truncatula Npf17 Gene

Molecular and Functional Characterization of Medicago Truncatula Npf17 Gene

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2013
Creator: Salehin, Mohammad
Description: Legumes are unique among plants for their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen with the help of soil bacteria rhizobia. Medicago truncatula is used as a model legume to study different aspects of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. M. truncatula, in association with its symbiotic partner Sinorhizobium meliloti, fix atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, which the plant uses for amino acid biosynthesis and the bacteria get reduced photosynthate in return. M. truncatula NPF1.7 previously called MtNIP/LATD is required for symbiotic nitrogen fixing root nodule development and for normal root architecture. Mutations in MtNPF1.7 have defects in these processes. MtNPF1.7 encodes a member of the NPF family of transporters. Experimental results showing that MtNPF1.7 functioning as a high-affinity nitrate transporter are its expression restoring chlorate susceptibility to the Arabidopsis chl1-5 mutant and high nitrate transport in Xenopus laevis oocyte system. However, the weakest Mtnip-3 mutant allele also displays high-affinity nitrate transport in X. laevis oocytes and chlorate susceptibility to the Atchl1-5 mutant, suggesting that MtNPF1.7 might have another biochemical function. Experimental evidence shows that MtNPF1.7 also functions in hormone signaling. Constitutive expression of MtNPF1.7 in several species including M. truncatula results in plants with a robust growth phenotype. Using a synthetic auxin reporter, the presence ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Functional Characterization of Mtnip/latd’s Biochemical and Biological Function

Functional Characterization of Mtnip/latd’s Biochemical and Biological Function

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Date: December 2013
Creator: Bagchi, Rammyani
Description: Symbiotic nitrogen fixation occurs in plants harboring nitrogen-fixing bacteria within the plant tissue. The most widely studied association is between the legumes and rhizobia. In this relationship the plant (legumes) provides the bacteria (rhizobia) with reduced carbon derived from photosynthesis in exchange for reduced atmospheric nitrogen. This allows the plant to survive in soil, which is low in available of nitrogen. Rhizobia infect and enter plant root and reside in organs known as nodules. In the nodules the bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen. The association between the legume, Medicago truncatula and the bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti, has been studied in detail. Medicago mutants that have defects in nodulation help us understand the process of nitrogen fixation better. One such mutant is the Mtnip-1. Mtnip-1 plants respond to S. meliloti by producing abnormal nodules in which numerous aberrant infection threads are produced, with very rare rhizobial release into host plant cells. The mutant plant Mtnip-1 has an abnormal defense-like response in root nodules as well as defects in lateral root development. Three alleles of the Mtnip/latd mutants, Mtnip-1, Mtlatd and Mtnip-3 show different degrees of severity in their phenotype. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MtNIP/LATD encodes a protein belonging to the NRT1(PTR) family of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
N-Acylethanolamines and Plant Phospholipase D

N-Acylethanolamines and Plant Phospholipase D

Date: December 1998
Creator: Brown, Shea Austin
Description: Recently, three distinct isoforms of phospholipase D (PLD) were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. PLD α represents the well-known form found in plants, while PLD β and γ have been only recently discovered (Pappan et al., 1997b; Qin et al., 1997). These isoforms differ in substrate selectivity and cofactors required for activity. Here, I report that PLD β and γ isoforms were active toward N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE), but PLD α was not. The ability of PLD β and γ to hydrolyze NAPE marks a key difference from PLD α. N-acylethanolamines (NAE), the hydrolytic products of NAPE by PLD β and γ, inhibited PLD α from castor bean and cabbage. Inhibition of PLD α by NAE was dose-dependent and inversely proportional to acyl chain length and degree of unsaturation. Enzyme kinetic analysis suggested non-competitive inhibition of PLD α by NAE 14:0. In addition, a 1.2-kb tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cDNA fragment was isolated that possessed a 74% amino acid identity to Arabidopsis PLD β indicating that this isoform is expressed in tobacco cells. Collectively, these results provide evidence for NAE producing PLD activities and suggest a possible regulatory role for NAE with respect to PLD α.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Application of Synthetic Peptides as Substrates for Reversible Phosphorylation

Application of Synthetic Peptides as Substrates for Reversible Phosphorylation

Date: August 1992
Creator: Abukhalaf, Imad Kazem
Description: Two highly homologous synthetic peptides MLC(3-13) (K-R-A-K-A-K-T-TK-K-R-G) and MLC(5-13) (A-K-A-K-T-T-K-K-R-G) corresponding to the amino terminal amino acid sequence of smooth muscle myosin light chain were utilized as substrates for protein kinase C purified from murine lymphosarcoma tumors to determine the role of the primary amino acid sequence of protein kinase C substrates in defining the lipid (phosphatidyl serine and diacylglycerol) requirements for the activation of the enzyme. Removal of the basic residues lysine and arginine from the amino terminus of MLC(3-13) did not have a significant effect on the Ka value of diacylglycerol. The binding of effector to calcium-protein kinase C appears to be random since binding of one effector did not block the binding of the other.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Identification of Endogenous Substrates for ADP-Ribosylation in Rat Liver

Identification of Endogenous Substrates for ADP-Ribosylation in Rat Liver

Date: May 1992
Creator: Loflin, Paul T. (Paul Tracey)
Description: Bacterial toxins have been shown to modify animal cell proteins in vivo with ADPR. Animal cells also contain endogenous enzymes that can modify proteins. Indirect evidence for the existence in vivo of rat liver proteins modified by ADPR on arginine residues has been reported previously. Presented here is direct evidence for the existence of ADP-ribosylarginine in rat liver proteins. Proteins were subjected to exhaustive protease digestion and ADP-ribosyl amino acids were isolated by boronate chromatography.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Study of the Intrinsic Fluorescence of O-Acetyl-L-Serine Sulfhydrylase-A from Salmonella typhimurium

A Study of the Intrinsic Fluorescence of O-Acetyl-L-Serine Sulfhydrylase-A from Salmonella typhimurium

Date: May 1993
Creator: McClure, G. David (George David)
Description: O-Acetyl-L-serine sulfhydrylase-A (OASS-A) forms acetate and L-cysteine from O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) and sulfide. One molecule of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'- phosphate (PLP) is bound in each holoenzyme protomer.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Autophosphorylation and Autoactivation of an S6/H4 Kinase Isolated From Human Placenta

Autophosphorylation and Autoactivation of an S6/H4 Kinase Isolated From Human Placenta

Date: May 1994
Creator: Dennis, Patrick B. (Patrick Brian)
Description: A number of protein kinases have been shown to undergo autophosphorylation, but few have demonstrated a coordinate increase or decrease in enzymatic activity as a result. Described here is a novel S6 kinase isolated from human placenta which autoactivates through autophosphorylation in vitro. This S6/H4 kinase, purified in an inactive state, was shown to be a protein of Mr of 60,000 as estimated by SDS-PAGE and could catalyze the phosphorylation of the synthetic peptide S6-21, the histone H4, and myelin basic protein. Mild digestion of the inactive S6/H4 kinase with trypsin was necessary, but not sufficient, to activate the kinase fully
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Characterization of a Human 28S Ribosomal RNA Retropseudogene and Other Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Isolated from a Human X Chromosome-Specific Library

Characterization of a Human 28S Ribosomal RNA Retropseudogene and Other Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Isolated from a Human X Chromosome-Specific Library

Date: May 1994
Creator: Wang, Suyue
Description: Three genomic clones encompassing human DNA segments (designated LhX-3, LhX-4, and LhX5) were isolated from an X chromosome-specific library and subjected to analysis by physical mapping and DNA sequencing. It was found that these three clones are very rich in repetitive DNA sequence elements and retropseudogenes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Kinetic and Chemical Mechanism of 6-phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from Candida Utilis

Kinetic and Chemical Mechanism of 6-phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from Candida Utilis

Date: May 1993
Creator: Berdis, Anthony J. (Anthony Joseph)
Description: A complete initial velocity study of the 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from Candida utilis in both reaction directions suggests a rapid equilibrium random kinetic mechanism with dead-end E:NADP:(ribulose 5-phosphate) and E:NADPH:(6- phosphogluconate) complexes. Initial velocity studies obtained as a function of pH and using NAD as the dinucleotide substrate for the reaction suggest that the 2'-phosphate is critical for productive binding of the dinucleotide substrate. Primary deuterium isotope effects using 3-<i-6-phosphogluconate were obtained for the 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase reaction using NADP and various alternative inucleotide substrates.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Fumarate Activation and Kinetic Solvent Isotope Effects as Probes of the NAD-Malic Enzyme Reaction

Fumarate Activation and Kinetic Solvent Isotope Effects as Probes of the NAD-Malic Enzyme Reaction

Date: December 1992
Creator: Lai, Chung-Jeng
Description: The kinetic mechanism of activation of the NAD-malic enzyme by fumarate and the transition state structure for the oxidation malate for the NAD-malic enzyme reaction have been studied. Fumarate exerts its activating effect by decreasing the off-rate for malate from the E:Mg:malate and E:Mg:NAD:malate complexes. The activation by fumarate results in a decrease in K_imalate and an increase in V/K_malate by about 2-fold, while the maximum velocity remains constant. A discrimination exists between active and activator sites for the binding of dicarboxylic acids. Activation by fumarate is proposed to have physiologic importance in the parasite. The hydride transfer transition state for the NAD-malic enzyme reaction is concerted with respect to solvent isotope sensitive and hydride transfer steps. Two protons are involved in the solvent isotope sensitive step, one with a normal fractionation factor, another with an inverse fractionation factor. A structure for the transition state for hydride transfer in the NAD-malic enzyme reaction is proposed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Development of Enabling Technologies to Visualize the Plant Lipidome

Development of Enabling Technologies to Visualize the Plant Lipidome

Date: August 2013
Creator: Horn, Patrick J.
Description: Improvements in mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategies for characterizing the plant lipidome through quantitative and qualitative approaches such as shotgun lipidomics have substantially enhanced our understanding of the structural diversity and functional complexity of plant lipids. However, most of these approaches require chemical extractions that result in the loss of the original spatial context and cellular compartmentation for these compounds. To address this current limitation, several technologies were developed to visualize lipids in situ with detailed chemical information. A subcellular visualization approach, direct organelle MS, was developed for directly sampling and analyzing the triacylglycerol contents within purified lipid droplets (LDs) at the level of a single LD. Sampling of single LDs demonstrated seed lipid droplet-to-droplet variability in triacylglycerol (TAG) composition suggesting that there may be substantial variation in the intracellular packaging process for neutral lipids in plant tissues. A cellular and tissue visualization approach, MS imaging, was implemented and enhanced for visualizing the lipid distributions in oilseeds. In mature cotton seed embryos distributions of storage lipids (TAGs) and their phosphatidylcholine (PCs) precursors were distribution heterogeneous between the cotyledons and embryonic axis raising new questions about extent and regulation of oilseed heterogeneity. Extension of this methodology provides an avenue for understanding metabolism ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Desensitized Phosphofructokinase from Ascaris suum: A Study in Noncooperative Allostery

Desensitized Phosphofructokinase from Ascaris suum: A Study in Noncooperative Allostery

Date: May 1993
Creator: Payne, Marvin A.
Description: The studies described in this dissertation examine the effects of F-2,6-P2 and AMP or phosphorylation on the kinetic mechanism of d-PFK. The effect of varied pH on the activation by F-2,6-P2 is also described.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Dependence of the Kinetic Mechanism of Adenosine 3',5'-Monophosphate Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit in the Direction of Magnesium Adenosine 5'-Diphosphate Phosphorylation on pH and the Concentration of Free Magnesium Ions

Dependence of the Kinetic Mechanism of Adenosine 3',5'-Monophosphate Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit in the Direction of Magnesium Adenosine 5'-Diphosphate Phosphorylation on pH and the Concentration of Free Magnesium Ions

Date: December 1992
Creator: Qamar, Raheel
Description: To define the overall kinetic and chemical mechanism of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, the mechanism in the direction of MgADP phosphorylation was determined, using studies of initial velocity in the absence and presence of dead-end inhibitors. The kinetic mechanism was determined as a function of uncomplexed Mg^2+ (Mg_f) at pH 7.2 and as a function of pH at low (0.5 mM) Mg_f. At pH 7.2 data are consistent with a random kinetic mechanism in the direction of MgADP phosphorylation with both pathways allowed: the pathway in which MgADP binds to enzyme prior to phosphorylated peptide (PSP) and that in which PSP binds before MgADP. One or the other pathway predominates, depending on Mg_f concentration. At 0.5 mM Mg_f, the mechanism is steady-state ordered with the pathway where PSP binds first preferred; at 10 mM Mg_f, the mechanism is equilibrium ordered, and the pathway in which MgADP binds first preferred. This change in mechanism to equilibrium ordered is due to an increase in affinity of enzyme for MgADP and a decrease in affinity for PSP. There is also a pH-dependent change in mechanism at 0.5 mM Mg_f. At pH 6 the mechanism is equilibrium ordered with the pathway ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Kinetic and Chemical Mechanism of O-Acetylserine Sulfhydrylase-B from Salmonella Typhimurium

Kinetic and Chemical Mechanism of O-Acetylserine Sulfhydrylase-B from Salmonella Typhimurium

Date: August 1993
Creator: Tai, Chia-Hui
Description: Initial velocity studies of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B (OASS-B) from Salmonella typhimurium using both natural and alternative substrates suggest a Bi Bi ping pong kinetic mechanism with double substrate competitive inhibition. The ping pong mechanism is corroborated by a qualitative and quantitative analysis of product and dead-end inhibition. Product inhibition by acetate is S-parabolic noncompetitive, indication of a combination of acetate with E followed by OAS. These data suggest some randomness to the OASS-B kinetic mechanism. The pH dependence of kinetic parameters was determined in order to obtain information on the acid-base chemical mechanism for the OASS-B reaction. A mechanism is proposed in which an enzyme general base accepts a proton from α-amine of O-acetylserine, while a second enzyme general base acts by polarizing the acetyl carbonyl assisting in the β-elimination of the acetyl group of O-acetylserine. The ε-amine of the active site lysine acts as a general base to abstract the α-proton in the β-elimination of acetate. At the end of the first half reaction the ε-amine of the active site lysine that formed the internal Schiff base and the general base are protonated. The resulting α-aminoacrylate intermediate undergoes a Michael addition with HS‾ and the active site lysine donates its ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Studies of the Mechanism of Plasma Cholesterol Esterification in Aged Rats

Studies of the Mechanism of Plasma Cholesterol Esterification in Aged Rats

Date: December 1989
Creator: Lee, Sun Min
Description: The study was performed to determine factors influencing the esteriflcation of plasma cholesterol in young and aged rats. The distribution of LCAT activity was determined following gel nitration chromatography and ultracentrifugation of whole plasma respectively. When rat plasma was fractionated on a Bio-Gel A-5 Mcolumn, LCAT activity was found to be associated with the HDL fraction. A similar result was observed upon 24 hr density gradient ultracentrifugation of the plasma. However, following prolonged 40 hr preparative ultracentrifugation, the majority of the LCAT activity was displaced into the lipoprotein-free infranatant fraction (d> 1.225 g/ml). The dissociation of LCAT from the HDL fraction occured to a smaller extent in aged rat plasma than in young rat plasma. Plasma incubation (37°C) experiments followed by the isolation of lipoproteins and the subsequent analysis of their cholesterol content revealed that in vitro net esteriflcation of free cholesterol (FC) by LCAT as well as the fractional ufilization of HDL-FC as substrate were lower in the plasma of the aged animal as compared to that of the young animal despite the fact that the total pool of FC was higher in the former. The net transfer of FC from lower density lipoproteins (d<1.07 g/ml) to HDL provided ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Evidence for Multiple Functions of a Medicago Truncatula Transporter

Evidence for Multiple Functions of a Medicago Truncatula Transporter

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2014
Creator: Huang, Ying-Sheng
Description: Legumes play an important role in agriculture as major food sources for humans and as feed for animals. Bioavailable nitrogen is a limiting nutrient for crop growth. Legumes are important because they can form a symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria called rhizobia that results in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In this symbiosis, rhizobia provide nitrogen to the legumes and the legumes provide carbon sources to the rhizobia. The Medicago truncatula NPF1.7/NIP/LATD gene is essential for root nodule development and also for proper development of root architecture. Work in our lab on the MtNPF1.7/MtNIP/LATD gene has established that it encodes a nitrate transporter and strongly suggests it has another function. Mtnip-1/latd mutants have pleiotropic defects, which are only partially explained by defects in nitrate transport. MtNPF1.7/NIP/LATD is a member of the large and diverse NPF/NRT1(PTR) transporter family. NPF/NRT1(PTR) members have been shown to transport other compounds in addition to nitrate: nitrite, amino acids, di- and tri-peptides, dicarboxylates, auxin, abscisic acid and glucosinolates. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the AtNPF6.3/NRT1.1( CHL1) transporter was shown to transport auxin as well as nitrate. Atchl1 mutants have defects in root architecture, which may be explained by defects in auxin transport and/or nitrate sensing. Considering the pleiotropic phenotypes observed ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Studies of the Mechanism of the Catalytic Subunit of cAMP Dependent Protein Kinase

Studies of the Mechanism of the Catalytic Subunit of cAMP Dependent Protein Kinase

Date: August 1989
Creator: Yoon, Moon-Young
Description: The kinetic mechanism of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase has been determined to be random in the direction of MgADP phosphorylation by using initial velocity studies in the absence and presence of the product, phospho-Serpeptide (Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser[P]-Leu-Gly) , and dead-end inhibitors. In contrast to the kinetic parameters obtained in the direction of Serpeptide phosphorylation, the only kinetic parameters affected by Mg^2+ are the dissociation constants for E:phospho-Serpeptide and E:MgADP, which are decreased by about 4-fold. The dead-end analog MgAMPCP binds with an affinity equal to that of MgADP in contrast to MgAMPPCP, which binds weaker than MgATP. The ratio of the maximum velocities in the forward and reverse reactions is about 200, and the Haldane relationship gives a K-eq of (7.2 ± 2) x 10^2. The latter can be compared to the K-eq obtained by direct measurement of reactant concentrations (2.2 ± 0.4) x 10^3 and 31-P NMR (1 ± 0.5) x 10^3. Data for the pH dependence of kinetic parameters and inhibitor dissociation constants for the cAMP dependent protein kinase are consistent with a mechanism in which reactants selectively bind to an enzyme with the catalytic base unprotonated and an enzyme group required protonated for Ser-peptide binding. Preferentially MgATP binds fully ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Kinetic and Chemical Mechanism of Pyrophosphate-Dependent Phosphofructokinase

Kinetic and Chemical Mechanism of Pyrophosphate-Dependent Phosphofructokinase

Date: December 1988
Creator: Cho, Yong Kweon
Description: Data obtained from isotope exchange at equilibrium, exchange of inorganic phosphate against forward reaction flux, and positional isotope exchange of 18O from the (βγ-bridge position of pyrophosphate to a (β-nonbridge position all indicate that the pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase from Propionibacterium freudenreichii has a rapid equilibrium random kinetic mechanism. All exchange reactions are strongly inhibited at high concentrations of the fructose 6-phosphate/Pi and MgPPi/Pi substrate-product pairs and weakly inhibited at high concentrations of the MgPPi/fructose 1,6-bisphosphate pair suggesting three dead-end complexes, E:F6P:Pi, E:MgPPi:Pi, and E:FBP:MgPPi. Neither back-exchange by [32p] nor positional isotope exchange of 18O-bridge-labeled pyrophosphate was observed under any conditions, suggesting that either the chemical interconversion step or a step prior to it limits the overall rate of the reaction. Reduction of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-inactivated enzyme with NaB[3H]4 indicates that about 7 lysines are modified in free enzyme and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate protects 2 of these from modification. The pH dependence of the enzyme-reactant dissociation constants suggests that the phosphates of fructose 6-phosphate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, inorganic phosphate, and Mg-pyrophosphate must be completely ionized and that lysines are present in the vicinity of the 1- and 6-phosphates of the sugar phosphate and bisphosphates probably directly coordinated to these phosphates. The pH dependence of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries