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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: Computer Science
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Study of Parallel Algorithms Related to Subsequence Problems on the Sequent Multiprocessor System

Study of Parallel Algorithms Related to Subsequence Problems on the Sequent Multiprocessor System

Date: August 1994
Creator: Pothuru, Surendra
Description: The primary purpose of this work is to study, implement and analyze the performance of parallel algorithms related to subsequence problems. The problems include string to string correction problem, to determine the longest common subsequence problem and solving the sum-range-product, 1 —D pattern matching, longest non-decreasing (non-increasing) (LNS) and maximum positive subsequence (MPS) problems. The work also includes studying the techniques and issues involved in developing parallel applications. These algorithms are implemented on the Sequent Multiprocessor System. The subsequence problems have been defined, along with performance metrics that are utilized. The sequential and parallel algorithms have been summarized. The implementation issues which arise in the process of developing parallel applications have been identified and studied.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Security Model for Mobile Agents using X.509 Proxy Certificates

A Security Model for Mobile Agents using X.509 Proxy Certificates

Date: December 2002
Creator: Raghunathan, Subhashini
Description: Mobile agent technology presents an attractive alternative to the client-server paradigm for several network and real-time applications. However, for most applications, the lack of a viable agent security model has limited the adoption of the agent paradigm. This thesis presents a security model for mobile agents based on a security infrastructure for Computational Grids, and specifically, on X.509 Proxy Certificates. Proxy Certificates serve as credentials for Grid applications, and their primary purpose is temporary delegation of authority. Exploiting the similarity between Grid applications and mobile agent applications, this thesis motivates the use of Proxy Certificates as credentials for mobile agents. A new extension for Proxy Certificates is proposed in order to make them suited to mobile agent applications, and mechanisms are presented for agent-to-host authentication, restriction of agent privileges, and secure delegation of authority during spawning of new agents. Finally, the implementation of the proposed security mechanisms as modules within a multi-lingual and modular agent infrastructure, the Distributed Agent Delivery System, is discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Evaluation of MPLS Enabled Networks

Evaluation of MPLS Enabled Networks

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2003
Creator: Ratnakaram, Archith
Description: Recent developments in the Internet have inspired a wide range of business and consumer applications. The deployment of multimedia-based services has driven the demand for increased and guaranteed bandwidth requirements over the network. The diverse requirements of the wide range of users demand differentiated classes of service and quality assurance. The new technology of Multi-protocol label switching (MPLS) has emerged as a high performance and reliable option to address these challenges apart from the additional features that were not addressed before. This problem in lieu of thesis describes how the new paradigm of MPLS is advantageous over the conventional architecture. The motivation for this paradigm is discussed in the first part, followed by a detailed description of this new architecture. The information flow, the underlying protocols and the MPLS extensions to some of the traditional protocols are then discussed followed by the description of the simulation. The simulation results are used to show the advantages of the proposed technology.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Intelligent Memory Manager: Towards improving the locality behavior of allocation-intensive applications.

Intelligent Memory Manager: Towards improving the locality behavior of allocation-intensive applications.

Date: May 2004
Creator: Rezaei, Mehran
Description: Dynamic memory management required by allocation-intensive (i.e., Object Oriented and linked data structured) applications has led to a large number of research trends. Memory performance due to the cache misses in these applications continues to lag in terms of execution cycles as ever increasing CPU-Memory speed gap continues to grow. Sophisticated prefetcing techniques, data relocations, and multithreaded architectures have tried to address memory latency. These techniques are not completely successful since they require either extra hardware/software in the system or special properties in the applications. Software needed for prefetching and data relocation strategies, aimed to improve cache performance, pollutes the cache so that the technique itself becomes counter-productive. On the other hand, extra hardware complexity needed in multithreaded architectures decelerates CPU's clock, since "Simpler is Faster." This dissertation, directed to seek the cause of poor locality behavior of allocation--intensive applications, studies allocators and their impact on the cache performance of these applications. Our study concludes that service functions, in general, and memory management functions, in particular, entangle with application's code and become the major cause of cache pollution. In this dissertation, we present a novel technique that transfers the allocation and de-allocation functions entirely to a separate processor residing in ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Procedural content creation and technologies for 3D graphics applications and games.

Procedural content creation and technologies for 3D graphics applications and games.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2005
Creator: Roden, Timothy E.
Description: The recent transformation of consumer graphics (CG) cards into powerful 3D rendering processors is due in large measure to the success of game developers in delivering mass market entertainment software that feature highly immersive and captivating virtual environments. Despite this success, 3D CG application development is becoming increasingly handicapped by the inability of traditional content creation methods to keep up with the demand for content. The term content is used here to refer to any data operated on by application code that is meant for viewing, including 3D models, textures, animation sequences and maps or other data-intensive descriptions of virtual environments. Traditionally, content has been handcrafted by humans. A serious problem facing the interactive graphics software development community is how to increase the rate at which content can be produced to keep up with the increasingly rapid pace at which software for interactive applications can now be developed. Research addressing this problem centers around procedural content creation systems. By moving away from purely human content creation toward systems in which humans play a substantially less time-intensive but no less creative part in the process, procedural content creation opens new doors. From a qualitative standpoint, these types of systems will not ...
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A Machine Learning Method Suitable for Dynamic Domains

A Machine Learning Method Suitable for Dynamic Domains

Date: July 1996
Creator: Rowe, Michael C. (Michael Charles)
Description: The efficacy of a machine learning technique is domain dependent. Some machine learning techniques work very well for certain domains but are ill-suited for other domains. One area that is of real-world concern is the flexibility with which machine learning techniques can adapt to dynamic domains. Currently, there are no known reports of any system that can learn dynamic domains, short of starting over (i.e., re-running the program). Starting over is neither time nor cost efficient for real-world production environments. This dissertation studied a method, referred to as Experience Based Learning (EBL), that attempts to deal with conditions related to learning dynamic domains. EBL is an extension of Instance Based Learning methods. The hypothesis of the study related to this research was that the EBL method would automatically adjust to domain changes and still provide classification accuracy similar to methods that require starting over. To test this hypothesis, twelve widely studied machine learning datasets were used. A dynamic domain was simulated by presenting these datasets in an uninterrupted cycle of train, test, and retrain. The order of the twelve datasets and the order of records within each dataset were randomized to control for order biases in each of ten runs. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Dynamic Grid-Based Data Distribution Management in Large Scale Distributed Simulations

Dynamic Grid-Based Data Distribution Management in Large Scale Distributed Simulations

Date: December 2000
Creator: Roy, Amber Joyce
Description: Distributed simulation is an enabling concept to support the networked interaction of models and real world elements that are geographically distributed. This technology has brought a new set of challenging problems to solve, such as Data Distribution Management (DDM). The aim of DDM is to limit and control the volume of the data exchanged during a distributed simulation, and reduce the processing requirements of the simulation hosts by relaying events and state information only to those applications that require them. In this thesis, we propose a new DDM scheme, which we refer to as dynamic grid-based DDM. A lightweight UNT-RTI has been developed and implemented to investigate the performance of our DDM scheme. Our results clearly indicate that our scheme is scalable and it significantly reduces both the number of multicast groups used, and the message overhead, when compared to previous grid-based allocation schemes using large-scale and real-world scenarios.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Security problems in 802.11 wireless networks standard due to the inefficiency of wired equivalent privacy protocol.

Security problems in 802.11 wireless networks standard due to the inefficiency of wired equivalent privacy protocol.

Date: May 2003
Creator: Samanthapudi, Varma
Description: Due to the rapid growth of wireless networking, the fallible security issues of the 802.11 standard have come under close scrutiny. Nowadays most of the organizations are eager to setup wireless local area networks to reduce the hassles of limited mobility provided by conventional wired network. There are serious security issues that need to be sorted out before everyone is willing to transmit valuable corporate information on a wireless network. This report documents the inherent flaws in wired equivalent privacy protocol used by the 802.11 standard and the ensuing security breaches that can occur to a wireless network due to these flaws. The solutions suggested in this report might not actually make the 802.11 standard secure, but will surely help in the lead up to a secure wireless network standard.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Elicitation of Protein-Protein Interactions from Biomedical Literature Using Association Rule Discovery

Elicitation of Protein-Protein Interactions from Biomedical Literature Using Association Rule Discovery

Date: August 2010
Creator: Samuel, Jarvie John
Description: Extracting information from a stack of data is a tedious task and the scenario is no different in proteomics. Volumes of research papers are published about study of various proteins in several species, their interactions with other proteins and identification of protein(s) as possible biomarker in causing diseases. It is a challenging task for biologists to keep track of these developments manually by reading through the literatures. Several tools have been developed by computer linguists to assist identification, extraction and hypotheses generation of proteins and protein-protein interactions from biomedical publications and protein databases. However, they are confronted with the challenges of term variation, term ambiguity, access only to abstracts and inconsistencies in time-consuming manual curation of protein and protein-protein interaction repositories. This work attempts to attenuate the challenges by extracting protein-protein interactions in humans and elicit possible interactions using associative rule mining on full text, abstracts and captions from figures available from publicly available biomedical literature databases. Two such databases are used in our study: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and PubMed Central (PMC). A corpus is built using articles based on search terms. A dataset of more than 38,000 protein-protein interactions from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Rollback Reduction Techniques Through Load Balancing in Optimistic Parallel Discrete Event Simulation

Rollback Reduction Techniques Through Load Balancing in Optimistic Parallel Discrete Event Simulation

Date: May 1996
Creator: Sarkar, Falguni
Description: Discrete event simulation is an important tool for modeling and analysis. Some of the simulation applications such as telecommunication network performance, VLSI logic circuits design, battlefield simulation, require enormous amount of computing resources. One way to satisfy this demand for computing power is to decompose the simulation system into several logical processes (Ip) and run them concurrently. In any parallel discrete event simulation (PDES) system, the events are ordered according to their time of occurrence. In order for the simulation to be correct, this ordering has to be preserved. There are three approaches to maintain this ordering. In a conservative system, no lp executes an event unless it is certain that all events with earlier time-stamps have been executed. Such systems are prone to deadlock. In an optimistic system on the other hand, simulation progresses disregarding this ordering and saves the system states regularly. Whenever a causality violation is detected, the system rolls back to a state saved earlier and restarts processing after correcting the error. There is another approach in which all the lps participate in the computation of a safe time-window and all events with time-stamps within this window are processed concurrently. In optimistic simulation systems, there is ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries