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 Degree Discipline: Chemistry
 Degree Level: Doctoral
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Chromatographic and Spectroscopic Studies on Aquatic Fulvic Acid

Chromatographic and Spectroscopic Studies on Aquatic Fulvic Acid

Date: August 1986
Creator: Chang, David Juan-Yuan
Description: High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) was used to investigate the utility of this technique for the analytical and preparative separation of components of aquatic fulvic acids (FA). Three modes of HPLC namely adsorption, anion exchange and reversed phase were evaluated. Aquatic fulvic acids were either extracted from surface water and sediment samples collected from the Southwest of the U.S., or were provided in a high purity form from the USGS. On the adsorption mode, a major fraction of aquatic fulvic acid was isolated on a semipreparative scale and subjected to Carbon-13 NMR and FAB Mass Spectroscopy. Results indicated that (1) The analyzed fraction of fulvic acid contains more aliphatic than aromatic moieties; (2) Methoxy, carboxylic acids, and esters are well-defined moieties of the macromolecule; (3) Phenolic components of the macromolecules were not detected in the Carbon-13 NMR spectrum possibly because of the presence of stable free radicals. Results of the anion exchange mode have shown that at least three types of acidic functionalities in aquatic fulvic acid can be separated. Results also indicated that aquatic fulvic acid can be progressively fractionated by using subsequent modes of HPLC. Results of reversed phase mode have shown that (1) The fractionation of aquatic ...
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Combined Electrochemistry and Spectroscopy of Complexes and Supramolecules containing Bipyridyl and Other Azabiphenyl Building Blocks

Combined Electrochemistry and Spectroscopy of Complexes and Supramolecules containing Bipyridyl and Other Azabiphenyl Building Blocks

Date: August 1995
Creator: Yang, Lei
Description: A group of azabiphenyl complexes and supramolecules, and their reduced and oxidized forms when possible, were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electronic absorption spectroscopy. The oxidized and reduced species, if sufficiently stable, were further generated electrochemically inside a specially designed quartz cell with optically transparent electrode, so that the spectra of the electrochemically generated species could be taken in situ. Assignments were proposed for both parent and product electronic spectra. Species investigated included a range of Ru(II) and Pt(II) complexes, as well as catenanes and their comparents. Using the localized electronic model, the electrochemical reduction can be in most cases assigned as azabiphenyl-based, and the oxidation as transition metal-based. This is consistent with the fact that the azabiphenyl compounds have a low lying π* orbital. The electronic absorption spectra of the compounds under study are mainly composed of π —> π* bands with, in some cases, charge transfer bands also.
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Computational Studies of C–h/c–c Manipulation Utilizing Transition Metal Complexes

Computational Studies of C–h/c–c Manipulation Utilizing Transition Metal Complexes

Date: May 2015
Creator: Pardue, Daniel B.
Description: Density Functional Theory (DFT) is an effective tool for studying diverse metal systems. Presented herein are studies of a variety of metal systems, which can be applied to accomplish transformations that are currently difficult/impossible to achieve. The specific topics studied utilizing DFT include: 1) C–H bond activation via an Earth-abundant transition metal complex, 2) C–H bond deprotonation via an alkali metal superbase, 3) and amination/aziridination reactions utilizing a CuI reagent. Using DFT, the transformation to methanol (CH3OH) from methane (CH4) was examined. The transition metal systems studied for this transformation included a model FeII complex. This first-row transition metal is an economical, Earth-abundant metal. The ligand set for this transformation includes a carbonyl ligand in one set of complexes as well as a phosphite ligand in another. The 3d Fe metal shows the ability to convert alkyls/aryls to their oxidized counterpart in an energetically favorable manner. Also, “superbasic” alkali metal amides were investigated to perform C—H bond cleavage. Toluene was the substrate of interest with Cs chosen to be the metal of interest because of the highly electropositive nature of this alkali metal. These highly electrophilic Cs metal systems allow for very favorable C—H bond scission with a toluene substrate. ...
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Computational Studies of Selected Ruthenium Catalysis Reactions.

Computational Studies of Selected Ruthenium Catalysis Reactions.

Date: December 2007
Creator: Barakat, Khaldoon A.
Description: Computational techniques were employed to investigate pathways that would improve the properties and characteristics of transition metal (i.e., ruthenium) catalysts, and to explore their mechanisms. The studied catalytic pathways are particularly relevant to catalytic hydroarylation of olefins. These processes involved the +2 to +3 oxidation of ruthenium and its effect on ruthenium-carbon bond strengths, carbon-hydrogen bond activation by 1,2-addition/reductive elimination pathways appropriate to catalytic hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and the possible intermediacy of highly coordinatively unsaturated (e.g., 14-electron) ruthenium complexes in catalysis. The calculations indicate a significant decrease in the Ru-CH3 homolytic bond dissociation enthalpy for the oxidation of TpRu(CO)(NCMe)(Me) to its RuIII cation through both reactant destabilization and product stabilization. This oxidation can thus lead to the olefin polymerization observed by Gunnoe and coworkers, since weak RuIII-C bonds would afford quick access to alkyl radical species. Calculations support the experimental proposal of a mechanism for catalytic hydrogen/deuterium exchange by a RuII-OH catalyst. Furthermore, calculational investigations reveal a probable pathway for the activation of C-H bonds that involves phosphine loss, 1,2-addition to the Ru-OH bond and then reversal of these steps with deuterium to incorporate it into the substrate. The presented results offer the indication for the net addition of aromatic C-H ...
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Computational Study of Small Molecule Activation via Low-Coordinate Late First-Row Transition Metal Complexes

Computational Study of Small Molecule Activation via Low-Coordinate Late First-Row Transition Metal Complexes

Date: May 2010
Creator: Pierpont, Aaron
Description: Methane and dinitrogen are abundant precursors to numerous valuable chemicals such as methanol and ammonia, respectively. However, given the robustness of these substrates, catalytically circumventing the high temperatures and pressures required for such transformations has been a challenging task for chemists. In this work, computational studies of various transition metal catalysts for methane C-H activation and N2 activation have been carried out. For methane C-H activation, catalysts of the form LnM=E are studied, where Ln is the supporting ligand (dihydrophosphinoethane or β-diketiminate), E the activating ligand (O, NCH3, NCF3) at which C-H activation takes place, and M the late transition metal (Fe,Co,Ni,Cu). A hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) / radical rebound (RR) mechanism is assumed for methane functionalization (CH4 à CH3EH). Since the best energetics are found for (β-diket)Ni=O and (β-diket)Cu=O catalysts, with or without CF3 substituents around the supporting ligand periphery, complete methane-to-methanol cycles were studied for such systems, for which N2O was used as oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reagent. Both monometallic and bimetallic OAT pathways are addressed. Monometallic Fe-N2 complexes of various supporting ligands (LnFe-N2) are studied at the beginning of the N2 activation chapter, where the effect of ligand on N2 activation in end-on vs. side-on N2 isomers ...
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Computer Simulations of Dilute Polymer Solutions: Chain Overlaps and Entanglements

Computer Simulations of Dilute Polymer Solutions: Chain Overlaps and Entanglements

Date: August 1996
Creator: Drewniak, Marta
Description: Chain conformations and the presence of chain overlaps and entanglements in dilute polymer solutions have been analyzed. The fundamental problem of existence of chain overlaps in dilute solutions is related to the drag reduction phenomenon (DR). Even though DR occurs in solutions with the concentration of only few parts per million (ppm), some theories suggest that entanglements may play an important role in DR mechanism. Brownian dynamics technique have been used to perform simulations of dilute polymer solutions at rest and under shear flow. A measure of interchain contacts and two different measures of entanglements have been devised to evaluate the structure of polymer chains in solution. Simulation results have shown that overlaps and entanglements do exist in static dilute solutions as well as in solutions under shear flow. The effect of solution concentration, shear rate and molecular mass have been examined. In agreement with the solvation theory of DR mechanism, simulation results have demonstrated the importance of polymer + polymer interactions in dilute solutions.
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Conformationally Stable Cyclohexyllithium Compounds

Conformationally Stable Cyclohexyllithium Compounds

Date: January 1968
Creator: Selman, Charles Melvin
Description: Organolitnium compounds have been employed in synthetic worK for many years. However only during the last decade has much progress been made in establishing the mechanistic pathways for the reactions of these compounds.
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The Crystal and Molecular Structures of 8-Hydroxyquinoline-N-Oxide and 2-Hydroxymethylpyridine-N-Oxide

The Crystal and Molecular Structures of 8-Hydroxyquinoline-N-Oxide and 2-Hydroxymethylpyridine-N-Oxide

Date: June 1970
Creator: Terry, John Christopher
Description: This dissertation looked at the crystal structure analysis of 2-hydroxymethylpyridine-N-oxide sine this compound could provide data on both substituent effects and hydrogen bonding.
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The Crystal and Molecular Structures of Tri-(p-Fluorophenyl)-Amine and Tri-(p-Iodophenyl)-Amine

The Crystal and Molecular Structures of Tri-(p-Fluorophenyl)-Amine and Tri-(p-Iodophenyl)-Amine

Date: January 1970
Creator: Freeman, Gerald R. (Gerald Richard)
Description: Because of the need for data on the geometry of nitrogen in arylamines, the determination of the crystal and molecular structures of tri-(p-fluorophenyl)-amine (TFPA) and tri-(p-iodophenyl)-amine (TIPA) was undertaken as the subject of this dissertation.
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The Development of Predictive Models for the Acid Degradation of Chrysotile Asbestos

The Development of Predictive Models for the Acid Degradation of Chrysotile Asbestos

Date: May 1993
Creator: Ingram, Kevin D. (Kevin Dean)
Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the factors affecting the acid degradation of chrysotile asbestos (Mg_3Si_2O_5(OH_4)) . Millions of tons of asbestos have found use in this country as insulative or ablative material. More than 95 percent of the asbestos in use is of the chrysotile variety. The remaining 5 percent is composed of various types of fibrous amphiboles. The inhalation of asbestos can lead to several diseases in humans. Asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma are the most common afflictions associated with asbestos inhalation, and they may occur up to 40 years after the initial exposure. It has previously been reported that if more than 50 percent of the magnesium is removed from a chrysotile sample its carcinogenicity is reduced to nil. Several inorganic acids were studied to determine their ability to leach magnesium from chrysotile. It was found that the ability to leach magnesium was dependent upon the acidic anion in addition to the concentration of the acid. The ordering of the efficiency of the acids in their ability to remove magnesium from chrysotile was found to be HCl > H_2SO_4 > H_3PO_4 > HNO_3. Predictive equations were developed to allow the calculation of the amount of ...
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Diffusion Barriers/Adhesion Promoters. Surface and Interfacial Studies of Copper and Copper-Aluminum Alloys

Diffusion Barriers/Adhesion Promoters. Surface and Interfacial Studies of Copper and Copper-Aluminum Alloys

Date: August 2000
Creator: Shepherd, Krupanand Solomon
Description: The focus of this research is to study the interaction between copper and the diffusion barrier/adhesion promoter. The behavior of copper sputter-deposited onto sputter-cleaned tantalum nitride is investigated. The data show that copper growth on tantalum nitride proceeds with the formation of 3-D islands, indicating poor adhesion characteristics between copper and Ta0.4N. Post-annealing experiments indicate that copper will diffuse into Ta0.4N at 800 K. Although the data suggests that Ta0.4N is effective in preventing copper diffusion, copper's inability to wet Ta0.4N will render this barrier ineffective. The interaction of copper with oxidized tantalum silicon nitride (O/TaSiN) is characterized. The data indicate that initial copper depositions result in the formation a conformal ionic layer followed by Cu(0) formation in subsequent depositions. Post-deposition annealing experiments performed indicate that although diffusion does not occur for temperatures less than 800 K, copper "de-wetting" occurs for temperatures above 500 K. These results indicate that in conditions where the substrate has been oxidized facile de-wetting of copper may occur. The behavior of a sputter-deposited Cu0.6Al0.4 film with SiO2 (Cu0.6Al0.4/SiO2) is investigated. The data indicate that aluminum segregates to the SiO2 interface and becomes oxidized. For copper coverages less than ~ 0.31 ML (based on a Cu/O ...
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Diphosphine Ligand Activation Studies with Organotransition-Metal Compounds

Diphosphine Ligand Activation Studies with Organotransition-Metal Compounds

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2000
Creator: Wang, Jiancheng
Description: Thermolysis of CoRu(CO)7(m -PPh2) (1) in refluxing 1,2-dichloroethane in the presence of the diphosphine ligands 2,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)maleic anhydride (bma) and 4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (bpcd) furnishes the new mixed-metal complexes CoRu(CO)4(μ -P-P)(μ -PPh2) [where P-P = bma (3); bpcd (6)], along with trace amounts of the known complex CoRu(CO)6(PPh3)(μ -PPh2) (4). The requisite pentacarbonyl intermediates CoRu(CO)5(μ -P-P)(μ -PPh2) [where P-P = bma (2); bpcd (5)] have been prepared by separate routes and studied for their conversion to CoRu(CO)4(μ -P-P)(μ -PPh2). The complexes 2/3 and 5/6 have been isolated and fully characterized in solution by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The kinetics for the conversion of 2→3 and of 5→6 were measured by IR spectroscopy in chlorobenzene solvent. On the basis of the first-order rate constants, CO inhibition, and the activation parameters, a mechanism involving dissociative CO loss as the rate-limiting step is proposed. The solid-state structure of CoRu(CO)4(μ -bma)(μ -PPh2) (3) reveals that the two PPh2 groups are bound to the ruthenium center while the maleic anhydride π bond is coordinated to the cobalt atom. Thermolysis of the cluster Ru3(CO)12 with the bis(phosphine)hydrazine ligand (MeO)2PN(Me)N(Me)P(OMe)2 (dmpdmh) in toluene at 75°C furnishes the known clusters Ru4(CO)12[μ -N(Me)N(Me)] (9) and Ru3(CO)11[P(OMe)3] (10), in addition to the new ...
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Discontinuous Thermal Expansions and Phase Transformations in Crystals at Higher Temperatures

Discontinuous Thermal Expansions and Phase Transformations in Crystals at Higher Temperatures

Date: 1967
Creator: Hsu, Yuan Tsun
Description: The purpose of this investigation is to make more detailed studies of transformations. Fourteen compounds have been examined by high temperature X-ray diffraction for this purpose. The investigations have been carried out in such a way as to reveal: 1. the existence of transformations, 2. the influence of polarizability on thermal expansion, 3. the anisotropy of expansion, and 4. the discontinuity of thermal expansion.
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Electrochemical Dissolution of  ZnO Single Crystals

Electrochemical Dissolution of ZnO Single Crystals

Date: January 1970
Creator: Justice, David Dixon
Description: The separation of oxidation-reduction reactions into individual half-cells with a resulting "mixed potential" is well known as a dissolution mechanism for metals; however, the mechanism by which non-conducting crystals lose ions to the solution has been studied only slightly.
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The Electrochemical Properties of the Mercury/lithium Nitrate-potassium Nitrate Eutectic Interface

The Electrochemical Properties of the Mercury/lithium Nitrate-potassium Nitrate Eutectic Interface

Date: August 1968
Creator: Flinn, David R.
Description: The original purpose of this investigation was to attempt to apply the coulostatic method directly to a molten salt system. The inability to duplicate the reported capacity data for this system resulted in an investigation of the probable cause of this discrepancy between the data obtained by these different methods (14, 15).
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The Electrochemical Reduction of Methyl Vinyl Ketone in Aqueous Solutions

The Electrochemical Reduction of Methyl Vinyl Ketone in Aqueous Solutions

Date: January 1970
Creator: French, Eddie Carroll
Description: This work is an in-depth study of a system with an approach designed to determine the electrode processes and the factors or conditions which control them.
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Electrochemical synthesis of CeO2 and CeO2/montmorillonite nanocomposites.

Electrochemical synthesis of CeO2 and CeO2/montmorillonite nanocomposites.

Date: December 2003
Creator: Wang, Qi
Description: Nanocrystalline cerium oxide thin films on metal and semiconductor substrates have been fabricated with a novel electrodeposition approach - anodic oxidation. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that as-produced cerium oxide films are characteristic face-centered cubic fluorite structure with 5 ~ 20 nm crystal sizes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study probes the non-stoichiometry property of as-produced films. Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy have been applied to analyze the films as well. Deposition mode, current density, reaction temperature and pH have also been investigated and the deposition condition has been optimized for preferred oriented film formation: galvanostatic deposition with current density of -0.06 mA/cm2, T > 50oC and 7 < pH < 10. Generally, potentiostatic deposition results in random structured cerium oxide films. Sintering of potentiostatic deposited cerium oxide films leads to crystal growth and reach nearly full density at 1100oC. It is demonstrated that in-air heating favors the 1:2 stoichiometry of CeO2. Nanocrystalline cerium oxide powders (4 ~ 10 nm) have been produced with anodic electrochemical synthesis. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to investigate lattice expansion phenomenon related to the nanoscale cerium oxide particles. The pH of reaction solution plays an important role in electrochemical synthesis of cerium oxide films ...
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Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Polycarbocyclic Compounds

Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Polycarbocyclic Compounds

Date: May 1998
Creator: Shukla, Rajesh, 1964-
Description: Part I. Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 1,2,3,4,9,9-hexachloro-1α,4α,4aα,8aβ-tetrahydro-l,4-methanonaphthalene (32) and 1,2,3,4,9,9-hexachloro-lα,4α,6,7- tetrahydro-l,4-methanonaphthalene (33) to 4-methyl- and 4-phenyl-l,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione [MTAD and PTAD, respectively] and to N-methylmaleimide (NMM) have been studied. The structures of several of the resulting cycloadducts were determined by X-ray crystallographic methods. The observed stereoselectivity of each of these Diels-Alder reactions was further investigated via application of theoretical methods. Thus, semiempirical (AMI) and ab initio molecular orbital calculations were used to calculate relative energies. Ab initio calculations were employed to perform frontier molecular orbital analyses of diene-dienophile interactions.
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Explorations with Polycarbocyclic Cage Compounds

Explorations with Polycarbocyclic Cage Compounds

Date: August 1999
Creator: Chong, Hyun-Soon
Description: A variety of novel cage-functionalized pyridyl containing crown ethers have been prepared for use in selective alkali metal complexation studies. A highly preorganized, cage-functionalized cryptand also has been designed and has been synthesized for use as a selective Li+ complexant. The alkali metal picrate extraction profiles of these cage-functionalized crown ethers also have been studied. Novel cage-functionalized diazacrown ethers have been prepared for selective alkali metal complexation studies. Alkali metal picrate extraction experiments have been performed by using this new class of synthetic ionophores to investigate the effects of cage-annulation and the influence of N-pivot lariat sidearms upon their resulting complexation properties. Novel pyridyl containing calix[4]arene receptors were prepared. Analysis of their respective 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra suggests that calix[4]arene moieties in the ligand occupy the cone conformation. The complexation properties of these host molecules were estimated by performing a series of alkali metal picrate extraction experiments. An optically active cage-functionalized crown ether which contains a binaphthyl moiety as the chiral unit was prepared. The ability of the resulting optically active crown ether to distinguish between enantiomers of guest ammonium ions (i.e., phenylethylamonium and phenylglycinate salts) in transport experiments was investigated. Hexacyclo[11.2.1.02,12.05,10.05,15.010,14]hexadeca-6,8-diene-4,11-dione was prepared from hexacyclo[7.4.2.01,9.03,7.04,14.06,15] pentadeca-10,12-diene-2,8-dione. Unanticipated ...
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FT-NMR and Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Molecular Dynamics in Liquids

FT-NMR and Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Molecular Dynamics in Liquids

Date: December 1993
Creator: Wang, Kuen-Shian
Description: NMR relaxation and Raman lineshape analysis are well known methods for the study of molecular reorientational dynamics in liquids. The combination of these two methods provides another approach to tackle the characterization of molecular dynamics in liquids. Investigations presented here include (1) NMR relaxation study of polycyclic compounds in solution, (2) the study of nitromethane reorientational dynamics using the NMR and Raman methods, and (3) Raman lineshape analysis of reorientation hexafluorobenzene/benzene mixtures.
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General Chemistry Topic Coverage (GCTC) comparison between community colleges and universities in the United States.

General Chemistry Topic Coverage (GCTC) comparison between community colleges and universities in the United States.

Date: December 2006
Creator: El-Ashmawy, Amina Khalifa
Description: This study is based on survey responses of 224 general chemistry instructors at United States (U.S.) community colleges and universities representing 46 states. The mean values of General Chemistry Topic Coverage (GCTC) score, developed by this researcher specifically for this dissertation study as a measure of course content, were statistically analyzed. The aim of this study is to answer five research questions: (a) Is there a difference in mean GCTC scores between U.S. community colleges and four-year colleges and universities? (b) If there is a difference in mean GCTC score between the two study groups, what are the observed differences in subtopics covered between community colleges and four-year colleges and universities? (c) Considering both community colleges and universities, is there a difference in mean GCTC score between the different designated U.S. regions? (d) Considering both community college and university professors, is there a difference in GCTC score for professors with a master's degree compared to those with a doctorate?, and (e) Is there a correlation between GCTC score and the percentage of students that major in science? Results indicate that there is a statistically significant difference in course content between community colleges and universities, there is a statistically significant difference ...
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Halogenated 2-Oxetanones

Halogenated 2-Oxetanones

Date: May 1973
Creator: Patel, Arvind D.
Description: The purpose of this investigation is threefold: (1) to examine in detail the cycloaddition of halogenated ketenes and carbonyl compounds, (2) to study the decarboxylation of the resulting halogenated 2-oxetanones,and (3) to investigate the effect of halogens in the halogenated 2-oxetanones on the nucleophilic addition reaction.
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High Temperature Enthalpies of the Lead Halides: Enthalpies and Entropies of Fusion

High Temperature Enthalpies of the Lead Halides: Enthalpies and Entropies of Fusion

Date: June 1970
Creator: Linsey, Clarence W.
Description: The objectives of this investigation were: 1. To establish calorimetrically the transition temperature for the orthorhombic to cubic transition exhibited by PbF₂ and to determine the enthalpy of this transition. 2. To determine if the solid-solid phase transitions claimed in the literature for PbCl₂, PbF₂, PbBr₂, and PbI₂ were of thermodynamic importance, and if so, to determine the enthalpies of transition. 3. To determine if the discontinuous thermal expansions reported by Hsu for the lead halides were of thermodynamic importance. 4. To obtain reliable heat content data for the lead halides in both the solid and liquid states.
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Infrared Studies of Group VIB metal Carbonyl Derivatives

Infrared Studies of Group VIB metal Carbonyl Derivatives

Date: August 1971
Creator: Brown, Richard Arthur
Description: With three different proposals for the bonding in metal carbonyls, it was decided to look into the situation more thoroughly in order to see what other evidence was available to support or refute any of these ideas. It became obvious that a definite contradiction existed between the kinetic evidence of various metal carbonyls, and the concept of MC bond strengths as predicted by Cotton's theory.
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