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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: Computer Science
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Temporally Correct Algorithms for Transaction Concurrency Control in Distributed Databases

Temporally Correct Algorithms for Transaction Concurrency Control in Distributed Databases

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Tuck, Terry W.
Description: Many activities are comprised of temporally dependent events that must be executed in a specific chronological order. Supportive software applications must preserve these temporal dependencies. Whenever the processing of this type of an application includes transactions submitted to a database that is shared with other such applications, the transaction concurrency control mechanisms within the database must also preserve the temporal dependencies. A basis for preserving temporal dependencies is established by using (within the applications and databases) real-time timestamps to identify and order events and transactions. The use of optimistic approaches to transaction concurrency control can be undesirable in such situations, as they allow incorrect results for database read operations. Although the incorrectness is detected prior to transaction committal and the corresponding transaction(s) restarted, the impact on the application or entity that submitted the transaction can be too costly. Three transaction concurrency control algorithms are proposed in this dissertation. These algorithms are based on timestamp ordering, and are designed to preserve temporal dependencies existing among data-dependent transactions. The algorithms produce execution schedules that are equivalent to temporally ordered serial schedules, where the temporal order is established by the transactions' start times. The algorithms provide this equivalence while supporting currency to the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Computational Complexity of Hopfield Networks

Computational Complexity of Hopfield Networks

Date: August 1998
Creator: Tseng, Hung-Li
Description: There are three main results in this dissertation. They are PLS-completeness of discrete Hopfield network convergence with eight different restrictions, (degree 3, bipartite and degree 3, 8-neighbor mesh, dual of the knight's graph, hypercube, butterfly, cube-connected cycles and shuffle-exchange), exponential convergence behavior of discrete Hopfield network, and simulation of Turing machines by discrete Hopfield Network.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Evaluation of MPLS Enabled Networks

Evaluation of MPLS Enabled Networks

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Date: May 2003
Creator: Ratnakaram, Archith
Description: Recent developments in the Internet have inspired a wide range of business and consumer applications. The deployment of multimedia-based services has driven the demand for increased and guaranteed bandwidth requirements over the network. The diverse requirements of the wide range of users demand differentiated classes of service and quality assurance. The new technology of Multi-protocol label switching (MPLS) has emerged as a high performance and reliable option to address these challenges apart from the additional features that were not addressed before. This problem in lieu of thesis describes how the new paradigm of MPLS is advantageous over the conventional architecture. The motivation for this paradigm is discussed in the first part, followed by a detailed description of this new architecture. The information flow, the underlying protocols and the MPLS extensions to some of the traditional protocols are then discussed followed by the description of the simulation. The simulation results are used to show the advantages of the proposed technology.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Modeling Alcohol Consumption Using Blog Data

Modeling Alcohol Consumption Using Blog Data

Date: May 2013
Creator: Koh, Kok Chuan
Description: How do the content and writing style of people who drink alcohol beverages stand out from non-drinkers? How much information can we learn about a person's alcohol consumption behavior by reading text that they have authored? This thesis attempts to extend the methods deployed in authorship attribution and authorship profiling research into the domain of automatically identifying the human action of drinking alcohol beverages. I examine how a psycholinguistics dictionary (the Linguistics Inquiry and Word Count lexicon, developed by James Pennebaker), together with Kenneth Burke's concept of words as symbols of human action, and James Wertsch's concept of mediated action provide a framework for analyzing meaningful data patterns from the content of blogs written by consumers of alcohol beverages. The contributions of this thesis to the research field are twofold. First, I show that it is possible to automatically identify blog posts that have content related to the consumption of alcohol beverages. And second, I provide a framework and tools to model human behavior through text analysis of blog data.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Optimizing Non-pharmaceutical Interventions Using Multi-coaffiliation Networks

Optimizing Non-pharmaceutical Interventions Using Multi-coaffiliation Networks

Date: May 2013
Creator: Loza, Olivia G.
Description: Computational modeling is of fundamental significance in mapping possible disease spread, and designing strategies for its mitigation. Conventional contact networks implement the simulation of interactions as random occurrences, presenting public health bodies with a difficult trade off between a realistic model granularity and robust design of intervention strategies. Recently, researchers have been investigating the use of agent-based models (ABMs) to embrace the complexity of real world interactions. At the same time, theoretical approaches provide epidemiologists with general optimization models in which demographics are intrinsically simplified. The emerging study of affiliation networks and co-affiliation networks provide an alternative to such trade off. Co-affiliation networks maintain the realism innate to ABMs while reducing the complexity of contact networks into distinctively smaller k-partite graphs, were each partition represent a dimension of the social model. This dissertation studies the optimization of intervention strategies for infectious diseases, mainly distributed in school systems. First, concepts of synthetic populations and affiliation networks are extended to propose a modified algorithm for the synthetic reconstruction of populations. Second, the definition of multi-coaffiliation networks is presented as the main social model in which risk is quantified and evaluated, thereby obtaining vulnerability indications for each school in the system. Finally, maximization ...
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Implementation of Scalable Secure Multicasting

Implementation of Scalable Secure Multicasting

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Date: August 2002
Creator: Vellanki, Ramakrishnaprasad
Description: A large number of applications like multi-player games, video conferencing, chat groups and network management are presently based on multicast communication. As the group communication model is being deployed for mainstream use, it is critical to provide security mechanisms that facilitate confidentiality, authenticity and integrity in group communications. Providing security in multicast communication requires addressing the problem of scalability in group key distribution. Scalability is a concern in group communication due to group membership dynamics. Joining and leaving of members requires the distribution of a new session key to all the existing members of the group. The two approaches to key management namely centralized and distributed approaches are reviewed. A hybrid solution is then provided, which represents a improved scalable and robust approach for a secure multicast framework. This framework then is implemented in an example application of a multicast news service.
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Developing a Test Bed for Interactive Narrative in Virtual Environments

Developing a Test Bed for Interactive Narrative in Virtual Environments

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Date: August 2002
Creator: Mellacheruvu, Krishna
Description: As Virtual Environments (VE) become a more commonly used method of interaction and presentation, supporting users as they navigate and interact with scenarios presented in VE will be a significant issue. A key step in understanding the needs of users in these situations will be observing them perform representative tasks in a fully developed environment. In this paper, we describe the development of a test bed for interactive narrative in a virtual environment. The test bed was specifically developed to present multiple, simultaneous sequences of events (scenarios or narratives) and to support user navigation through these scenarios. These capabilities will support the development of multiple users testing scenarios, allowing us to study and better understand the needs of users of narrative VEs.
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Implementation of Back Up Host in TCP/IP

Implementation of Back Up Host in TCP/IP

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Date: December 2002
Creator: Golla,Mohan
Description: This problem in lieu thesis is considering a TCP client H1 making a connection to distant server S and is downloading a file. In the midst of the downloading, if H1 crashes, the TCP connection from H1 to S is lost. In the future, if H1 restarts, the TCP connection from H1 to S will be reestablished and the file will be downloaded again. This cannot happen until host H1 restarts. Now consider a situation where there is a standby host H2 for the host H1. H1 and H2 monitor the health of each other by heartbeat messages (like SCTP). If H2 detects the failure of H1, then H2 takes over. This implies that all resources assigned to H1 are now reassigned or taken over by H2. The host H1 and H2 transmit data between each other when any one of it crashed. Throughout the data transmission process, heart beat chunk is exchanged between the hosts when one of the host crashes. In particular, the IP addresses that were originally assigned to H1 are assigned to H2. In this scenario, movement of the TCP connection between H1 and S to a connection between H2 and S without disrupting the TCP ...
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The Design and Implementation of a Prolog Parser using javacc

The Design and Implementation of a Prolog Parser using javacc

Date: August 2002
Creator: Gupta, Pankaj
Description: Operatorless Prolog text is LL(1) in nature and any standard LL parser generator tool can be used to parse it. However, the Prolog text that conforms to the ISO Prolog standard allows the definition of dynamic operators. Since Prolog operators can be defined at run-time, operator symbols are not present in the grammar rules of the language. Unless the parser generator allows for some flexibility in the specification of the grammar rules, it is very difficult to generate a parser for such text. In this thesis we discuss the existing parsing methods and their modified versions to parse languages with dynamic operator capabilities. Implementation details of a parser using Javacc as a parser generator tool to parse standard Prolog text is provided. The output of the parser is an “Abstract Syntax Tree” that reflects the correct precedence and associativity rules among the various operators (static and dynamic) of the language. Empirical results are provided that show that a Prolog parser that is generated by the parser generator like Javacc is comparable in efficiency to a hand-coded parser.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Server load balancing.

Server load balancing.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2002
Creator: Kanuri, Jaichandra
Description: Server load balancing technology has obtained much attention as much business proceeded towards e-commerce. The idea behind is to have set of clustered servers that share the load as against a single server to achieve better performance and throughput. In this problem in lieu of thesis, I propose and evaluate an implementation of a prototype scalable server. The prototype consists of a load-balanced cluster of hosts that collectively accept and service TCP connections. The host IP addresses are advertised using the Round Robin DNS technique, allowing any host to receive requests from any client. Once a client attempts to establish a TCP connection with one of the hosts, a decision is made as to whether or not the connection should be redirected to a different host namely, the host with the lowest number of established connections. This problem in lieu of thesis outlines the history of load balancing, various options available today and finally approach for implementing the prototype and the corresponding findings.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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