You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: Computer Science
 Degree Level: Doctoral
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
A Mechanism for Facilitating Temporal Reasoning in Discrete Event Simulation

A Mechanism for Facilitating Temporal Reasoning in Discrete Event Simulation

Date: May 1992
Creator: Legge, Gaynor W.
Description: This research establishes the feasibility and potential utility of a software mechanism which employs artificial intelligence techniques to enhance the capabilities of standard discrete event simulators. As background, current methods of integrating artificial intelligence with simulation and relevant research are briefly reviewed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Using Extended Logic Programs to Formalize Commonsense Reasoning

Using Extended Logic Programs to Formalize Commonsense Reasoning

Date: May 1992
Creator: Horng, Wen-Bing
Description: In this dissertation, we investigate how commonsense reasoning can be formalized by using extended logic programs. In this investigation, we first use extended logic programs to formalize inheritance hierarchies with exceptions by adopting McCarthy's simple abnormality formalism to express uncertain knowledge. In our representation, not only credulous reasoning can be performed but also the ambiguity-blocking inheritance and the ambiguity-propagating inheritance in skeptical reasoning are simulated. In response to the anomalous extension problem, we explore and discover that the intuition underlying commonsense reasoning is a kind of forward reasoning. The unidirectional nature of this reasoning is applied by many reformulations of the Yale shooting problem to exclude the undesired conclusion. We then identify defeasible conclusions in our representation based on the syntax of extended logic programs. A similar idea is also applied to other formalizations of commonsense reasoning to achieve such a purpose.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Using Normal Deduction Graphs in Common Sense Reasoning

Using Normal Deduction Graphs in Common Sense Reasoning

Date: May 1992
Creator: Munoz, Ricardo A. (Ricardo Alberto)
Description: This investigation proposes a powerful formalization of common sense knowledge based on function-free normal deduction graphs (NDGs) which form a powerful tool for deriving Horn and non-Horn clauses without functions. Such formalization allows common sense reasoning since it has the ability to handle not only negative but also incomplete information.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Multi-Time Scale Learning Mechanism for Neuromimic Processing

A Multi-Time Scale Learning Mechanism for Neuromimic Processing

Date: August 1994
Creator: Mobus, George E. (George Edward)
Description: Learning and representing and reasoning about temporal relations, particularly causal relations, is a deep problem in artificial intelligence (AI). Learning such representations in the real world is complicated by the fact that phenomena are subject to multiple time scale influences and may operate with a strange attractor dynamic. This dissertation proposes a new computational learning mechanism, the adaptrode, which, used in a neuromimic processing architecture may help to solve some of these problems. The adaptrode is shown to emulate the dynamics of real biological synapses and represents a significant departure from the classical weighted input scheme of conventional artificial neural networks. Indeed the adaptrode is shown, by analysis of the deep structure of real synapses, to have a strong structural correspondence with the latter in terms of multi-time scale biophysical processes. Simulations of an adaptrode-based neuron and a small network of neurons are shown to have the same learning capabilities as invertebrate animals in classical conditioning. Classical conditioning is considered a fundamental learning task in animals. Furthermore, it is subject to temporal ordering constraints that fulfill the criteria of causal relations in natural systems. It may offer clues to the learning of causal relations and mechanisms for causal reasoning. The ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Highly Fault-Tolerant Distributed Database System with Replicated Data

A Highly Fault-Tolerant Distributed Database System with Replicated Data

Date: December 1994
Creator: Lin, Tsai S. (Tsai Shooumeei)
Description: Because of the high cost and impracticality of a high connectivity network, most recent research in transaction processing has focused on a distributed replicated database system. In such a system, multiple copies of a data item are created and stored at several sites in the network, so that the system is able to tolerate more crash and communication failures and attain higher data availability. However, the multiple copies also introduce a global inconsistency problem, especially in a partitioned network. In this dissertation a tree quorum algorithm is proposed to solve this problem, imposing a logical tree structure along with dynamic system reconfiguration on all the copies of each data item. The proposed algorithm can be viewed as a dynamic voting technique which, with the help of an appropriate concurrency control algorithm, exhibits the major advantages of quorum-based replica control algorithms and of the available copies algorithm, so that a single copy is read for a read operation and a quorum of copies is written for a write operation. In addition, read and write quorums are computed dynamically and independently. As a result expensive read operations, like those that require several copies of a data item to be read in most ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Recognition of Face Images

Recognition of Face Images

Date: December 1994
Creator: Pershits, Edward
Description: The focus of this dissertation is a methodology that enables computer systems to classify different up-front images of human faces as belonging to one of the individuals to which the system has been exposed previously. The images can present variance in size, location of the face, orientation, facial expressions, and overall illumination. The approach to the problem taken in this dissertation can be classified as analytic as the shapes of individual features of human faces are examined separately, as opposed to holistic approaches to face recognition. The outline of the features is used to construct signature functions. These functions are then magnitude-, period-, and phase-normalized to form a translation-, size-, and rotation-invariant representation of the features. Vectors of a limited number of the Fourier decomposition coefficients of these functions are taken to form the feature vectors representing the features in the corresponding vector space. With this approach no computation is necessary to enforce the translational, size, and rotational invariance at the stage of recognition thus reducing the problem of recognition to the k-dimensional clustering problem. A recognizer is specified that can reliably classify the vectors of the feature space into object classes. The recognizer made use of the following principle: ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Theoretical Network Model and the Incremental Hypercube-Based Networks

A Theoretical Network Model and the Incremental Hypercube-Based Networks

Date: May 1995
Creator: Mao, Ai-sheng
Description: The study of multicomputer interconnection networks is an important area of research in parallel processing. We introduce vertex-symmetric Hamming-group graphs as a model to design a wide variety of network topologies including the hypercube network.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Unifying Version Model for Objects and Schema in Object-Oriented Database System

A Unifying Version Model for Objects and Schema in Object-Oriented Database System

Date: August 1997
Creator: Shin, Dongil
Description: There have been a number of different versioning models proposed. The research in this area can be divided into two categories: object versioning and schema versioning. In this dissertation, both problem domains are considered as a single unit. This dissertation describes a unifying version model (UVM) for maintaining changes to both objects and schema. UVM handles schema versioning operations by using object versioning techniques. The result is that the UVM allows the OODBMS to be much smaller than previous systems. Also, programmers need know only one set of versioning operations; thus, reducing the learning time by half. This dissertation shows that UVM is a simple but semantically sound and powerful version model for both objects and schema.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Efficient Algorithms and Framework for Bandwidth Allocation, Quality-of-Service Provisioning and Location Management in Mobile Wireless Computing

Efficient Algorithms and Framework for Bandwidth Allocation, Quality-of-Service Provisioning and Location Management in Mobile Wireless Computing

Date: December 1997
Creator: Sen, Sanjoy Kumar
Description: The fusion of computers and communications has promised to herald the age of information super-highway over high speed communication networks where the ultimate goal is to enable a multitude of users at any place, access information from anywhere and at any time. This, in a nutshell, is the goal envisioned by the Personal Communication Services (PCS) and Xerox's ubiquitous computing. In view of the remarkable growth of the mobile communication users in the last few years, the radio frequency spectrum allocated by the FCC (Federal Communications Commission) to this service is still very limited and the usable bandwidth is by far much less than the expected demand, particularly in view of the emergence of the next generation wireless multimedia applications like video-on-demand, WWW browsing, traveler information systems etc. Proper management of available spectrum is necessary not only to accommodate these high bandwidth applications, but also to alleviate problems due to sudden explosion of traffic in so called hot cells. In this dissertation, we have developed simple load balancing techniques to cope with the problem of tele-traffic overloads in one or more hot cells in the system. The objective is to ease out the high channel demand in hot cells by ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Exon/Intron Discrimination Using the Finite Induction Pattern Matching Technique

Exon/Intron Discrimination Using the Finite Induction Pattern Matching Technique

Date: December 1997
Creator: Taylor, Pamela A., 1941-
Description: DNA sequence analysis involves precise discrimination of two of the sequence's most important components: exons and introns. Exons encode the proteins that are responsible for almost all the functions in a living organism. Introns interrupt the sequence coding for a protein and must be removed from primary RNA transcripts before translation to protein can occur. A pattern recognition technique called Finite Induction (FI) is utilized to study the language of exons and introns. FI is especially suited for analyzing and classifying large amounts of data representing sequences of interest. It requires no biological information and employs no statistical functions. Finite Induction is applied to the exon and intron components of DNA by building a collection of rules based upon what it finds in the sequences it examines. It then attempts to match the known rule patterns with new rules formed as a result of analyzing a new sequence. A high number of matches predict a probable close relationship between the two sequences; a low number of matches signifies a large amount of difference between the two. This research demonstrates FI to be a viable tool for measurement when known patterns are available for the formation of rule sets.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT LAST