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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: English
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Characteristics of Intensive English Program Directors

Characteristics of Intensive English Program Directors

Date: August 1994
Creator: Atkinson, Tamara D. (Tamara Dawn)
Description: The purpose of this study is to discover if there exists a difference between the perceived roles and functions of intensive English program (IEP) directors and what they actually are. The study is a partial replication of Matthies (1983). A total of 46 subjects participated in a nation-wide survey which asked the respondents to rate the importance of functions and skills in good job performance and in self-assessment of ability. The findings indicated that IEP directors rate the activities associated with administration higher in importance than teaching skills, yet rate themselves better at teaching overall. Additionally, the respondents have more and higher degrees in Linguistics and Applied Linguistics than previously seen by Matthies (1983).
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Ethics in Technical Communication: Historical Context for the Human Radiation Experiments

Ethics in Technical Communication: Historical Context for the Human Radiation Experiments

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2005
Creator: Audrain, Susan Connor
Description: To illustrate the intersection of ethical language and ethical frameworks within technical communication, this dissertation analyzes the history and documentation of the human radiation experiments of the 1940s through the 1970s. Research propositions included clarifying the link between medical documentation and technical communication by reviewing the literature that links the two disciplines from the ancient period to the present; establishing an appropriate historiography for the human radiation experiments by providing a context of the military, political, medical, and rhetorical milieu of the 1940s to the 1970s; closely examining and analyzing actual human radiation experiment documentation, including proposals, letters, memos, and consent forms, looking for established rhetorical constructions that indicate a document adheres to or diverts from specific ethical frameworks; and suggesting the importance of the human radiation documents for studying ethics in technical communication. Close rhetorical analysis of the documents included with this project reveals consistent patterns of metadiscourse, passive and nominal writing styles, and other rhetorical constructions, including negative language, redundancies, hedges, and intensifiers, that could lead a reader to misunderstand the writer's original ethical purpose. Ultimately this project finds that technical communicators cannot classify language itself as ethical or unethical; the language is simply the framework with which ...
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Sir Arthur Wing Pinero's Treatment of Women in Four Social Plays

Sir Arthur Wing Pinero's Treatment of Women in Four Social Plays

Date: August 1967
Creator: Bailey, Don B.
Description: The purpose of this thesis is to survey Sir Arthur Wing Pinero's treatment and development of the leading women in four of his most highly regarded "social" plays. Their texts will be analyzed carefully in order to arrive at answers to the following questions: What problems do these women confront and how do they attempt to solve them? What are the factors which determine their success or failure? Are their failures due to inherent flaws in character or outside influences? To what extent do these women control their destiny? What common traits do these women possess and in what respects do they differ? What is Pinero's idea of women's role in society, and what is his idea of women in general? What can one learn of Pinero's art from a study of these women?
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Rain and Diagonal Light: Nature Imagery in the Novels of John Cheever

Rain and Diagonal Light: Nature Imagery in the Novels of John Cheever

Date: December 1987
Creator: Baker, Cynthia J. (Cynthia Jane)
Description: John Cheever uses nature imagery, particularly images of light and water, to support his main themes of nostalgia, memory, tradition, alienation, travel, and confinement in his five novels. In the novels these images entwine and intersect to reveal Cheever's vision of an attainable earthly paradise comprised of familial love and an appreciation of the beauties and strengths of the natural world.
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Always Painting the Future: Utopian Desire and the Women's Movement in Selected Works by United States Female Writers at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Always Painting the Future: Utopian Desire and the Women's Movement in Selected Works by United States Female Writers at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Date: August 2009
Creator: Balic, Iva
Description: This study explores six utopias by female authors written at the turn of the twentieth century: Mary Bradley Lane's Mizora (1881), Alice Ilgenfritz Jones and Ella Merchant's Unveiling Parallel (1893), Eloise O. Richberg's Reinstern (1900), Lena J. Fry's Other Worlds (1905), Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland (1915), and Martha Bensley Bruère's Mildred Carver, USA (1919). While the right to vote had become the central, most important point of the movement, women were concerned with many other issues affecting their lives. Positioned within the context of the late nineteenth century women's rights movement, this study examines these "sideline" concerns of the movement such as home and gender-determined spheres, motherhood, work, marriage, independence, and self-sufficiency and relates them to the transforming character of female identity at the time. The study focuses primarily on analyzing the expression of female historical desire through utopian genre and on explicating the contradictory nature of utopian production.
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The Role of Women in the Work of William Faulkner

The Role of Women in the Work of William Faulkner

Date: August 1968
Creator: Balkman, Betty Ann
Description: This study attempts to categorize the major women characters of Faulkner, and with a brief description of each, cast light upon the relationship of that character to Faulkner's other women and to the author's ultimate view of womankind.
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Everything and Nothing at the Same Time

Everything and Nothing at the Same Time

Date: May 1999
Creator: Ballenger, Hank D.
Description: This paradoxically titled collection of poems explores what the blues and blindness has come to mean to the author.
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Epoch Stages of Consciousness in The Rainbow

Epoch Stages of Consciousness in The Rainbow

Date: May 1978
Creator: Bardas, Mary Louise Ivey
Description: In The Rainbow D. H. Lawrence departs from traditional literary techniques, going below the level of ego consciousness within his characters to focus on the elemental dynamic forces of their unconscious minds. Using three generations of the Brangwen family, Lawrence traces the rise of consciousness from the primal unity of the uroboros through the matriarchal epoch and finally to full consciousness, the realization of the self, in Ursula Brangwen. By correlating the archetypal symbols characteristic of three stages of consciousness outlined in Erich Neumann's Origins and History of Consciousness and The Great Mother with the three sections of the novel, it is possible to show that Lawrence utilizes the symbols most appropriate to each stage.
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Orality, Literacy, and Heroism in Huckleberry Finn

Orality, Literacy, and Heroism in Huckleberry Finn

Date: August 1986
Creator: Barrow, William David, 1955-
Description: This work re-assesses the heroic character of Huckleberry Finn in light of the inherent problems of discourse. Walter Ong's insights into the differences between oral and literate consciousnesses, and Stanley Fish's concept of "interpretive communities" are applied to Huck's interactions with the other characters, revealing the underlying dynamic of his character, the need for a viable discourse community. Further established, by enlisting the ideas of Ernest Becker, is that this need for community finds its source in the most fundamental human problem, the consciousness of death. The study concludes that the problematic ending of Twain's novel is consistent with the theme of community and is neither the artistic failure, nor the cynical pronouncement on the human race that so many critics have seen it to be.
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The Poetic Voice and the Romantic Tradition in the Poetry of Maxine Kumin

The Poetic Voice and the Romantic Tradition in the Poetry of Maxine Kumin

Date: December 1979
Creator: Barton, Beverly D.
Description: The purpose of this study is to explore elements of the Romantic tradition in the poetry of Maxine Kumin and the poetic voice of Ms. Kumin as she writes in this tradition. The poet's choice of poetic-persona illustrates a growth of the consciousness, an identity of self. Of particular interest is the poet's close interaction with nature and use of natural symbols and images. A principal motif in Kumin's poetry is the common man. Another theme is the poet's role in the family. In poems exalting nature and the person who lives in simple and close interaction with nature, a number of men from the past and present are subjects of Kumin's poetry.
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Mark Twain's Representation of the American West

Mark Twain's Representation of the American West

Date: August 1953
Creator: Bass, Jeanne H.
Description: The purpose of this paper is to picture the West as Mark Twain saw it. Many books have been written which describe Twain's Western years, but few have given much consideration to the accuracy of his account of the West in the 1860's. This paper attempts to portray Twain not only as a social and political satirist, but also as a possible historical satirist.
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The Epic Element in Hiawatha

The Epic Element in Hiawatha

Date: August 1953
Creator: Bass, Mary Laura
Description: By tracing the development of the epic, oral and written, as in Chapter III, the qualities that are characteristic of the epic and the devices associated with the epic through continued usage were found to be the constant factors upon which the definition of the epic is formulated. The application to Hiawatha of the epic definition in terms of form, theme, subject matter, characters, tone, the use of the supernatural, and the use of characteristic devices, strengthens the thesis that Longfellow has written an epic.
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The Noh Plays of William Butler Yeats: Accomplishment in Failure

The Noh Plays of William Butler Yeats: Accomplishment in Failure

Date: May 1971
Creator: Bays, Carol Ann
Description: This paper is a study of the effect of W. B. Yeats's contact with Japanese Noh drama on his work. The immediately discernible effect on his work can be seen, of course, in his adaptation of Noh dramatic form to his Four Plays for Dancers and The Death of Cuchulain. It is the thesis of this paper, then, that, despite many handicaps, Yeats's aesthetic background was not only sufficient to discover what suggestion did lie in the limited information available to him concerning Noh, but also sufficient for him to intuit much of what wasn't suggested.
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Reflections of Other/Reflections of Self

Reflections of Other/Reflections of Self

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Bebout, Lee
Description: This Thesis collection contains a critical preface and five stories. The preface, “Reflejos y Reflexiones” (translated: Images and Thoughts), addresses the issues of writing the cultural or gendered Other; these issues include methodology, literary colonialism, a dialogue between works, and creating distance through defamiliarizing the self. “Perennials” is the story of Noemi Tellez, an immigrant to the U.S. who must choose between working and taking care of her family. In “Load Bearing” Luis, the eldest child, faces his family and friends on one of his last days before moving away to college. “La Monarca” deals with Lily's, the youngest daughter, struggle to mediate a place between her friends and her family. In “Reflections in the River,” Arabela, the second youngest, faces the ghost of an unwanted pregnancy and La Llorona. “La Cocina de Su Madre” is the story of Magda, the oldest daughter, and her own teenage girl, Natalia, as they attempt to find themselves in a new town after moving a thousand miles from home.
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John Donne's Double Vision :  Basic Dualities in the Sermon Literature

John Donne's Double Vision : Basic Dualities in the Sermon Literature

Date: May 1971
Creator: Beck, Allen D.
Description: This thesis is concerned with establishing the basis for evaluating John Donne's sermon literature as a thematic whole. In order to demonstrate this thematic unity and continuity, this study shows how Donne employes several bodies of imagery which reflect his double vision of man and sin and provide the basis for discussing the basic dualities in the bulk of Donne's 160 extant sermons.
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Miscegenated Narration: The Effects of Interracialism in Women's Popular Sentimental Romances from the Civil War Years

Miscegenated Narration: The Effects of Interracialism in Women's Popular Sentimental Romances from the Civil War Years

Date: May 2011
Creator: Beeler, Connie
Description: Critical work on popular American women's fiction still has not reckoned adequately with the themes of interracialism present in these novels and with interracialism's bearing on the sentimental. This thesis considers an often overlooked body of women's popular sentimental fiction, published from 1860-1865, which is interested in themes of interracial romance or reproduction, in order to provide a fuller picture of the impact that the intersection of interracialism and sentimentalism has had on American identity. By examining the literary strategy of "miscegenated narration," or the heteroglossic cacophony of narrative voices and ideological viewpoints that interracialism produces in a narrative, I argue that the hegemonic ideologies of the sentimental romance are both "deterritorialized" and "reterritorialized," a conflicted impulse that characterizes both nineteenth-century sentimental, interracial romances and the broader project of critiquing the dominant national narrative that these novels undertake.
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The Problem of the Artist in Society : Hawthorne, James, and Hemingway

The Problem of the Artist in Society : Hawthorne, James, and Hemingway

Date: August 1960
Creator: Beggs, Jane K.
Description: The relationship of James to Hawthorne and of Hemingway to James certainly indicates the close literary relationship of the three writers. This development makes it seem only natural that three such self-conscious artists would have recourse to similar interests and would employ in their writings common themes, ideas, and methods.
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Anatomy of Loss

Anatomy of Loss

Date: August 1995
Creator: Behlen, Shawn Lee
Description: Anatomy of Loss contains a foreword, which discusses the place of autobiography in fiction, and five original short stories.
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East, West, Somewhere in the Middle

East, West, Somewhere in the Middle

Date: December 1997
Creator: Behlen, Shawn Lee
Description: A work of creative fiction in novella form, this dissertation follows the first-person travails of Mitch Zeller, a 26-year-old gay man who is faced with an unexpected choice. The dissertation opens with a preface which examines the form of the novella and the content of this particular work.
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Symbolism in Leaves of Grass

Symbolism in Leaves of Grass

Date: 1943
Creator: Bell, Clara Pierce
Description: This thesis discusses the symbolism found in Walt Whitman's second poetic period, as found in the collection Leaves of Grass.
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Dramatic Experiment in the Plays of Eugene O'Neill

Dramatic Experiment in the Plays of Eugene O'Neill

Date: 1941
Creator: Bell, Cyrene
Description: This survey of Eugene O'Neill's works attempts to establish that fact that he used a number of dramatic experiments in his plays and that he used them successfully.
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Graham Greene and the Idea of Childhood

Graham Greene and the Idea of Childhood

Date: June 1966
Creator: Bell, Martha Frances
Description: A marked preoccupation with childhood is evident throughout the works of Graham Greene; it receives most obvious expression in his concern with the idea that the course of a man's life is determined during his early years, but many of his other obsessive themes, such as betrayal, pursuit, and failure, may be seen to have their roots in general types of experience which Greene evidently believes to be common to all children.
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Thomas Mann's Use of Myth

Thomas Mann's Use of Myth

Date: January 1970
Creator: Bell, Rea Moody
Description: The subject of Mann's early fiction is a very modern one, dealing almost exclusively with the problems of the artist in bourgeois society. His work can be divided generally into two parts: the early writings, which examine the different aspects of the dilemma of the artist and the search for a unifying myth, and the later works, which explore the "lived myth" as a way to life and art.
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Personal Properties: Stage Props and Self-Expression in British Drama, 1600-1707

Personal Properties: Stage Props and Self-Expression in British Drama, 1600-1707

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2009
Creator: Bender, Ashley Brookner
Description: This dissertation examines the role of stage properties-props, slangily-in the construction and expression of characters' identities. Through readings of both canonical and non-canonical drama written between 1600 and 1707-for example, Thomas Middleton's The Revenger's Tragedy (1607), Edward Ravenscroft's adaptation of Titus Andronicus (1678), Aphra Behn's The Rover (1677), and William Wycherley's The Plain Dealer (1677)-I demonstrate how props mediate relationships between people. The control of a character's props often accords a person control of the character to whom the props belong. Props consequently make visual the relationships of power and subjugation that exist among characters. The severed body parts, bodies, miniature portraits, and containers of these plays are the mechanisms by which characters attempt to differentiate themselves from others. The characters deploy objects as proof of their identities-for example, when the women in Behn's Rover circulate miniatures of themselves-yet other characters must also interpret these objects. The props, and therefore the characters' identities, are at all times vulnerable to misinterpretation. Much as the props' meanings are often disputed, so too are characters' private identities often at odds with their public personae. The boundaries of selfhood that the characters wish to protect are made vulnerable by the objects that they use ...
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