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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: Chemistry
 Degree Level: Doctoral
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Kinetic studies and computational modeling of atomic chlorine reactions in the gas phase.

Kinetic studies and computational modeling of atomic chlorine reactions in the gas phase.

Date: August 2009
Creator: Alecu, Ionut M.
Description: The gas phase reactions of atomic chlorine with hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, benzene, and ethylene are investigated using the laser flash photolysis / resonance fluorescence experimental technique. In addition, the kinetics of the reverse processes for the latter two elementary reactions are also studied experimentally. The absolute rate constants for these processes are measured over a wide range of conditions, and the results offer new accurate information about the reactivity and thermochemistry of these systems. The temperature dependences of these reactions are interpreted via the Arrhenius equation, which yields significantly negative activation energies for the reaction of the chlorine atom and hydrogen sulfide as well as for that between the phenyl radical and hydrogen chloride. Positive activation energies which are smaller than the overall endothermicity are measured for the reactions between atomic chlorine with ammonia and ethylene, which suggests that the reverse processes for these reactions also possess negative activation energies. The enthalpies of formation of the phenyl and β-chlorovinyl are assessed via the third-law method. The stability and reactivity of each reaction system is further rationalized based on potential energy surfaces, computed with high-level ab initio quantum mechanical methods and refined through the inclusion of effects which arise from the ...
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Sensitization of Lanthanides and Organic-Based Phosphorescence via Energy Transfer and Heavy-Atom Effects

Sensitization of Lanthanides and Organic-Based Phosphorescence via Energy Transfer and Heavy-Atom Effects

Date: May 2010
Creator: Arvapally, Ravi K.
Description: The major topics discussed are the phosphorescence sensitization in the lanthanides via energy transfer and in the organics by heavy atom effects. The f-f transitions in lanthanides are parity forbidden and have weak molar extinction coefficients. Upon complexation with the ligand, ttrpy (4'-p-Tolyl-[2,2':6',2"]-terpyridine) the absorption takes place through the ligand and the excitation is transferred to the lanthanides, which in turn emit. This process is known as "sensitized luminescence." Bright red emission from europium and bright green emission from terbium complexes were observed. There is ongoing work on the making of OLEDs with neutral complexes of lanthanide hexafluoroacetyl acetonate/ttrpy, studied in this dissertation. Attempts to observe analogous energy transfer from the inorganic donor complexes of Au(I) thiocyanates were unsuccessful due to poor overlap of the emissions of these systems with the absorptions of Eu(III) and Tb(III). Photophysics of silver-aromatic complexes deals with the enhancement of phosphorescence in the aromatics. The heavy atom effect of the silver is responsible for this enhancement in phosphorescence. Aromatics such as naphthalene, perylene, anthracene and pyrene were involved in this study. Stern Volmer plots were studied by performing the quenching studies. The quenchers employed were both heavy metals such as silver and thallium and lighter ...
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Computational studies of selected ruthenium catalysis reactions.

Computational studies of selected ruthenium catalysis reactions.

Date: December 2007
Creator: Barakat, Khaldoon A.
Description: Computational techniques were employed to investigate pathways that would improve the properties and characteristics of transition metal (i.e., ruthenium) catalysts, and to explore their mechanisms. The studied catalytic pathways are particularly relevant to catalytic hydroarylation of olefins. These processes involved the +2 to +3 oxidation of ruthenium and its effect on ruthenium-carbon bond strengths, carbon-hydrogen bond activation by 1,2-addition/reductive elimination pathways appropriate to catalytic hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and the possible intermediacy of highly coordinatively unsaturated (e.g., 14-electron) ruthenium complexes in catalysis. The calculations indicate a significant decrease in the Ru-CH3 homolytic bond dissociation enthalpy for the oxidation of TpRu(CO)(NCMe)(Me) to its RuIII cation through both reactant destabilization and product stabilization. This oxidation can thus lead to the olefin polymerization observed by Gunnoe and coworkers, since weak RuIII-C bonds would afford quick access to alkyl radical species. Calculations support the experimental proposal of a mechanism for catalytic hydrogen/deuterium exchange by a RuII-OH catalyst. Furthermore, calculational investigations reveal a probable pathway for the activation of C-H bonds that involves phosphine loss, 1,2-addition to the Ru-OH bond and then reversal of these steps with deuterium to incorporate it into the substrate. The presented results offer the indication for the net addition of aromatic C-H ...
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Thermodynamic and Structural Studies of Layered Double Hydroxides

Thermodynamic and Structural Studies of Layered Double Hydroxides

Date: May 1998
Creator: Boclair, Joseph W. (Joseph Walter)
Description: The preparation of layered double hydroxides via titration with sodium hydroxide was thoroughly investigated for a number of M(II)/M(III) combinations. These titration curves were examined and used to calculate nominal solubility product constants and other thermodynamic quantities for the various LDH chloride systems.
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The Photolysis of Ethyllithium and Triethylaluminum

The Photolysis of Ethyllithium and Triethylaluminum

Date: January 1970
Creator: Brewer, Terry Lowell
Description: The majority of interest in organolithium and organoaluminum compounds has centered around their potency as polymerization catalysts.
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Infrared Studies of Group VIB metal Carbonyl Derivatives

Infrared Studies of Group VIB metal Carbonyl Derivatives

Date: August 1971
Creator: Brown, Richard Arthur
Description: With three different proposals for the bonding in metal carbonyls, it was decided to look into the situation more thoroughly in order to see what other evidence was available to support or refute any of these ideas. It became obvious that a definite contradiction existed between the kinetic evidence of various metal carbonyls, and the concept of MC bond strengths as predicted by Cotton's theory.
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Metal (II) Complexes with N-Salicylideneamino Acids

Metal (II) Complexes with N-Salicylideneamino Acids

Date: August 1969
Creator: Carlisle, Gene Ozelle
Description: Transition metal complexes derived from Schiff bases have rendered an important contribution to the development of modern coordination chemistry. Various stable compounds have been prepared having synthetic, biological, and physicochemical interest. In particular, complexes of salicylaldimines, B-ketoamines, and closely related ligand systems have been investigated.
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Adhesion/diffusion barrier layers for copper integration: carbon-silicon polymer films and tantalum substrates

Adhesion/diffusion barrier layers for copper integration: carbon-silicon polymer films and tantalum substrates

Date: December 1999
Creator: Chen, Li
Description: The Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has identified the integration of copper (Cu) with low-dielectric-constant (low-k) materials as a critical goal for future interconnect architectures. A fundamental understanding of the chemical interaction of Cu with various substrates, including diffusion barriers and adhesion promoters, is essential to achieve this goal. The objective of this research is to develop novel organic polymers as Cu/low-k interfacial layers and to investigate popular barrier candidates, such as clean and modified tantalum (Ta) substrates. Carbon-silicon (C-Si) polymeric films have been formed by electron beam bombardment or ultraviolet (UV) radiation of molecularly adsorbed vinyl silane precursors on metal substrates under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies show that polymerization is via the vinyl groups, while Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) results show that the polymerized films have compositions similar to the precursors. Films derived from vinyltrimethyl silane (VTMS) are adherent and stable on Ta substrates until 1100 K. Diffusion of deposited Cu overlayers is not observed below 800 K, with dewetting occurred only above 400 K. Hexafluorobenzene moieties can also be incorporated into the growing film with good thermal stability. Studies on the Ta substrates demonstrate that even sub-monolayer coverages of oxygen or carbide on polycrystalline ...
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Some Studies Pertaining to the Biosynthesis and Metabolism of Asparagine and Lysine in Lactobacillus Arabinosus: I. B-Aspartylhydroxamic Acid: Its Action as a Feedback Inhibitor and a Repressor of Asparagine Synthetase in Lactobacillus Arabinosus II. Purification and Properties of Diaminopimelate Decarboxylase from Lactobacillus Arabinosus

Some Studies Pertaining to the Biosynthesis and Metabolism of Asparagine and Lysine in Lactobacillus Arabinosus: I. B-Aspartylhydroxamic Acid: Its Action as a Feedback Inhibitor and a Repressor of Asparagine Synthetase in Lactobacillus Arabinosus II. Purification and Properties of Diaminopimelate Decarboxylase from Lactobacillus Arabinosus

Date: August 1969
Creator: Chen, Yueh Tsun
Description: That Lactobacillus arabinosus 17-5, ATCC 8014, can supply its own requirement for the amino acid, lysine, is demonstrated by the fact that the organism is capable of growth in media devoid of lysine. Since the final biosynthetic step in lysine formation in all bacteria studied to date involves the decarboxylation of meso-dlaminopimelic acid (DAP) to produce lysine, it was of interest to determine whether an enzyme catalyzing such a reaction (DAP decarboxylase) is present in L. arabinosus.
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Synthesis and host-guest interaction of cage-annulated podands, crown ethers, cryptands, cavitands and non-cage-annulated cryptands.

Synthesis and host-guest interaction of cage-annulated podands, crown ethers, cryptands, cavitands and non-cage-annulated cryptands.

Date: May 2003
Creator: Chen, Zhibing
Description: Symmetrical cage-annulated podands were synthesized via highly efficient synthetic strategies. Mechanisms to account for the key reaction steps in the syntheses are proposed; the proposed mechanisms receive support from the intermediates that have been isolated and characterized. An unusual complexation-promoted elimination reaction was studied, and a mechanism is proposed to account for the course of this reaction. This unusual elimination may generalized to other rigid systems and thus may extend our understanding of the role played by the host molecules in "cation-capture, anion-activation" via complexation with guest molecules. Thus, host-guest interaction serves not only to activate the anion but also may activate the leaving groups that participate in the complexation. Complexation-promoted elimination provides a convenient method to desymmetrize the cage while avoiding protection/deprotection steps. In addition, it offers a convenient method to prepare a chiral cage spacer by introducing 10 chiral centers into the host system in a single synthetic step. Cage-annulated monocyclic hosts that contain a cage-butylenoxy spacer were synthesized. Comparison of their metal ion complexation behavior as revealed by the results of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), alkali metal picrate extraction, and pseudohydroxide extraction with those displayed by the corresponding hosts that contain cage-ethylenoxy or cage-propylenoxy spacers reveals ...
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