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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Computer Science and Engineering
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Mobile agent security through multi-agent cryptographic protocols.

Mobile agent security through multi-agent cryptographic protocols.

Date: May 2004
Creator: Xu, Ke
Description: An increasingly promising and widespread topic of research in distributed computing is the mobile agent paradigm: code travelling and performing computations on remote hosts in an autonomous manner. One of the biggest challenges faced by this new paradigm is security. The issue of protecting sensitive code and data carried by a mobile agent against tampering from a malicious host is particularly hard but important. Based on secure multi-party computation, a recent research direction shows the feasibility of a software-only solution to this problem, which had been deemed impossible by some researchers previously. The best result prior to this dissertation is a single-agent protocol which requires the participation of a trusted third party. Our research employs multi-agent protocols to eliminate the trusted third party, resulting in a protocol with minimum trust assumptions. This dissertation presents one of the first formal definitions of secure mobile agent computation, in which the privacy and integrity of the agent code and data as well as the data provided by the host are all protected. We present secure protocols for mobile agent computation against static, semi-honest or malicious adversaries without relying on any third party or trusting any specific participant in the system. The security of ...
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Adaptive Planning and Prediction in Agent-Supported Distributed Collaboration.

Adaptive Planning and Prediction in Agent-Supported Distributed Collaboration.

Date: December 2004
Creator: Hartness, Ken T. N.
Description: Agents that act as user assistants will become invaluable as the number of information sources continue to proliferate. Such agents can support the work of users by learning to automate time-consuming tasks and filter information to manageable levels. Although considerable advances have been made in this area, it remains a fertile area for further development. One application of agents under careful scrutiny is the automated negotiation of conflicts between different user's needs and desires. Many techniques require explicit user models in order to function. This dissertation explores a technique for dynamically constructing user models and the impact of using them to anticipate the need for negotiation. Negotiation is reduced by including an advising aspect to the agent that can use this anticipation of conflict to adjust user behavior.
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Optimal Access Point Selection and Channel Assignment in IEEE 802.11 Networks

Optimal Access Point Selection and Channel Assignment in IEEE 802.11 Networks

Date: December 2004
Creator: Park, Sangtae
Description: Designing 802.11 wireless networks includes two major components: selection of access points (APs) in the demand areas and assignment of radio frequencies to each AP. Coverage and capacity are some key issues when placing APs in a demand area. APs need to cover all users. A user is considered covered if the power received from its corresponding AP is greater than a given threshold. Moreover, from a capacity standpoint, APs need to provide certain minimum bandwidth to users located in the coverage area. A major challenge in designing wireless networks is the frequency assignment problem. The 802.11 wireless LANs operate in the unlicensed ISM frequency, and all APs share the same frequency. As a result, as 802.11 APs become widely deployed, they start to interfere with each other and degrade network throughput. In consequence, efficient assignment of channels becomes necessary to avoid and minimize interference. In this work, an optimal AP selection was developed by balancing traffic load. An optimization problem was formulated that minimizes heavy congestion. As a result, APs in wireless LANs will have well distributed traffic loads, which maximize the throughput of the network. The channel assignment algorithm was designed by minimizing channel interference between APs. The ...
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Evaluating the Scalability of SDF Single-chip Multiprocessor Architecture Using Automatically Parallelizing Code

Evaluating the Scalability of SDF Single-chip Multiprocessor Architecture Using Automatically Parallelizing Code

Date: December 2004
Creator: Zhang, Yuhua
Description: Advances in integrated circuit technology continue to provide more and more transistors on a chip. Computer architects are faced with the challenge of finding the best way to translate these resources into high performance. The challenge in the design of next generation CPU (central processing unit) lies not on trying to use up the silicon area, but on finding smart ways to make use of the wealth of transistors now available. In addition, the next generation architecture should offer high throughout performance, scalability, modularity, and low energy consumption, instead of an architecture that is suitable for only one class of applications or users, or only emphasize faster clock rate. A program exhibits different types of parallelism: instruction level parallelism (ILP), thread level parallelism (TLP), or data level parallelism (DLP). Likewise, architectures can be designed to exploit one or more of these types of parallelism. It is generally not possible to design architectures that can take advantage of all three types of parallelism without using very complex hardware structures and complex compiler optimizations. We present the state-of-art architecture SDF (scheduled data flowed) which explores the TLP parallelism as much as that is supplied by that application. We implement a SDF single-chip ...
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An Empirical Evaluation of Communication and Coordination Effectiveness in Autonomous Reactive Multiagent Systems

An Empirical Evaluation of Communication and Coordination Effectiveness in Autonomous Reactive Multiagent Systems

Date: May 2005
Creator: Hurt, David
Description: This thesis describes experiments designed to measure the effect of collaborative communication on task performance of a multiagent system. A discrete event simulation was developed to model a multi-agent system completing a task to find and collect food resources, with the ability to substitute various communication and coordination methods. Experiments were conducted to find the effects of the various communication methods on completion of the task to find and harvest the food resources. Results show that communication decreases the time required to complete the task. However, all communication methods do not fare equally well. In particular, results indicate that the communication model of the bee is a particularly effective method of agent communication and collaboration. Furthermore, results indicate that direct communication with additional information content provides better completion results. Cost-benefit models show some conflicting information, indicating that the increased performance may not offset the additional cost of achieving that performance.
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Procedural content creation and technologies for 3D graphics applications and games.

Procedural content creation and technologies for 3D graphics applications and games.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2005
Creator: Roden, Timothy E.
Description: The recent transformation of consumer graphics (CG) cards into powerful 3D rendering processors is due in large measure to the success of game developers in delivering mass market entertainment software that feature highly immersive and captivating virtual environments. Despite this success, 3D CG application development is becoming increasingly handicapped by the inability of traditional content creation methods to keep up with the demand for content. The term content is used here to refer to any data operated on by application code that is meant for viewing, including 3D models, textures, animation sequences and maps or other data-intensive descriptions of virtual environments. Traditionally, content has been handcrafted by humans. A serious problem facing the interactive graphics software development community is how to increase the rate at which content can be produced to keep up with the increasingly rapid pace at which software for interactive applications can now be developed. Research addressing this problem centers around procedural content creation systems. By moving away from purely human content creation toward systems in which humans play a substantially less time-intensive but no less creative part in the process, procedural content creation opens new doors. From a qualitative standpoint, these types of systems will not ...
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FP-tree Based Spatial Co-location Pattern Mining

FP-tree Based Spatial Co-location Pattern Mining

Date: May 2005
Creator: Yu, Ping
Description: A co-location pattern is a set of spatial features frequently located together in space. A frequent pattern is a set of items that frequently appears in a transaction database. Since its introduction, the paradigm of frequent pattern mining has undergone a shift from candidate generation-and-test based approaches to projection based approaches. Co-location patterns resemble frequent patterns in many aspects. However, the lack of transaction concept, which is crucial in frequent pattern mining, makes the similar shift of paradigm in co-location pattern mining very difficult. This thesis investigates a projection based co-location pattern mining paradigm. In particular, a FP-tree based co-location mining framework and an algorithm called FP-CM, for FP-tree based co-location miner, are proposed. It is proved that FP-CM is complete, correct, and only requires a small constant number of database scans. The experimental results show that FP-CM outperforms candidate generation-and-test based co-location miner by an order of magnitude.
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A Minimally Supervised Word Sense Disambiguation Algorithm Using Syntactic Dependencies and Semantic Generalizations

A Minimally Supervised Word Sense Disambiguation Algorithm Using Syntactic Dependencies and Semantic Generalizations

Date: December 2005
Creator: Faruque, Md. Ehsanul
Description: Natural language is inherently ambiguous. For example, the word "bank" can mean a financial institution or a river shore. Finding the correct meaning of a word in a particular context is a task known as word sense disambiguation (WSD), which is essential for many natural language processing applications such as machine translation, information retrieval, and others. While most current WSD methods try to disambiguate a small number of words for which enough annotated examples are available, the method proposed in this thesis attempts to address all words in unrestricted text. The method is based on constraints imposed by syntactic dependencies and concept generalizations drawn from an external dictionary. The method was tested on standard benchmarks as used during the SENSEVAL-2 and SENSEVAL-3 WSD international evaluation exercises, and was found to be competitive.
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Planning techniques for agent based 3D animations.

Planning techniques for agent based 3D animations.

Date: December 2005
Creator: Kandaswamy, Balasubramanian
Description: The design of autonomous agents capable of performing a given goal in a 3D domain continues to be a challenge for computer animated story generation systems. We present a novel prototype which consists of a 3D engine and a planner for a simple virtual world. We incorporate the 2D planner into the 3D engine to provide 3D animations. Based on the plan, the 3D world is created and the objects are positioned. Then the plan is linearized into simpler actions for object animation and rendered via the 3D engine. We use JINNI3D as the engine and WARPLAN-C as the planner for the above-mentioned prototype. The user can interact with the system using a simple natural language interface. The interface consists of a shallow parser, which is capable of identifying a set of predefined basic commands. The command given by the user is considered as the goal for the planner. The resulting plan is created and rendered in 3D. The overall system is comparable to a character based interactive story generation system except that it is limited to the predefined 3D environment.
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Capacity and Throughput Optimization in Multi-cell 3G WCDMA Networks

Capacity and Throughput Optimization in Multi-cell 3G WCDMA Networks

Date: December 2005
Creator: Nguyen, Son
Description: User modeling enables in the computation of the traffic density in a cellular network, which can be used to optimize the placement of base stations and radio network controllers as well as to analyze the performance of resource management algorithms towards meeting the final goal: the calculation and maximization of network capacity and throughput for different data rate services. An analytical model is presented for approximating the user distributions in multi-cell third generation wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA) networks using 2-dimensional Gaussian distributions by determining the means and the standard deviations of the distributions for every cell. This model allows for the calculation of the inter-cell interference and the reverse-link capacity of the network. An analytical model for optimizing capacity in multi-cell WCDMA networks is presented. Capacity is optimized for different spreading factors and for perfect and imperfect power control. Numerical results show that the SIR threshold for the received signals is decreased by 0.5 to 1.5 dB due to the imperfect power control. The results also show that the determined parameters of the 2-dimensional Gaussian model match well with traditional methods for modeling user distribution. A call admission control algorithm is designed that maximizes the throughput in multi-cell ...
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