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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: School of Visual Arts
 Year: 2004
 Degree Discipline: Communication Design
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Instigating a Necessary Epiphany in Visual Message-Making for Design Educators and Future Communication Designers

Instigating a Necessary Epiphany in Visual Message-Making for Design Educators and Future Communication Designers

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2004
Creator: Sarkaria, Gagandeep
Description: Man has used graphic signs and symbols to express a variety of thoughts and feelings since before the invention of writing; they have helped him to preserve the ideologies that have enabled him to articulate his conception of the world. Every culture in every historical era has invested the objects, animals and plants around it with a multitude of different psychological meanings to communicate its essential belief systems and social aspirations. In my document, I chose to shed light on the responsibility I believe design educators must assume regarding their ability to understand and teach the importance of how similar graphic signs, symbols, ideograms and icons are perceived differently by different cultures in the hyper-connected, inter-global economy of 21st century. It is very crucial not to discount the influence and correlation of symbolic, fundamental building blocks of design with the basic psychological functions that inform our subconscious, and are also informed by our individual social and cultural upbringings. People from different cultures may cognate these shapes similarly, but they perceive and encode their meanings based on their particular social and cultural influences. One-size-fits-all communication design solutions rarely work, especially when they are distributed to culturally diverse audiences, because various ethnic ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Key Components of a Comprehensive Visual Information System for College-Level Design Education Curriculum Analysis

Key Components of a Comprehensive Visual Information System for College-Level Design Education Curriculum Analysis

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2004
Creator: Short, Scott Allen
Description: Electronic and computer technology have advanced and transformed graphic design. New technologies are forcing design educators to constantly monitor and update their programs, creating a need for a system to be adopted by college-level institutions to better investigate, evaluate and plan art and design curriculum. The author identifies metaphorical approaches to designing a two-part solution, which includes a Comprehensive Visual Information System (CVIS) and Three-Dimensional Virtual Database (3DVDb), which assign volumetric form to education components based on the form, structure and content of a discipline. Research and development of the conceptual design for the CVIS and 3DVDb are intended to aid in the development of an electronic media solution to be made accessible to students, faculty and administrators.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Learning from each other - Building a bridge between two unique cultural approaches to design education.

Learning from each other - Building a bridge between two unique cultural approaches to design education.

Date: May 2004
Creator: Huang, Ye
Description: As China is opening its doors to the world and getting more involved in the global market, it is facing great challenges and competition with other countries and cultures. In order to make Chinese graphic design industry more competitive and help Chinese businesses and industries have better success in the global market, I believed Chinese college-level design educators and students should learn more from advanced American graphic design processes and marketing methods to achieve a better understanding of Western design culture and make communication more successful. At the same time, I believed American college-level graphic design educators and students should become aware of strengths and weaknesses that exist in their own design education and learn from Chinese formal tradition.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries