You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: Business Computer Information Systems
 Degree Level: Doctoral
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
An Analysis of the Effect of Environmental and Systems Complexity on Information Systems Failures

An Analysis of the Effect of Environmental and Systems Complexity on Information Systems Failures

Date: August 2001
Creator: Zhang, Xiaoni
Description: Companies have invested large amounts of money on information systems development. Unfortunately, not all information systems developments are successful. Software project failure is frequent and lamentable. Surveys and statistical analysis results underscore the severity and scope of software project failure. Limited research relates software structure to information systems failures. Systematic study of failure provides insights into the causes of IS failure. More importantly, it contributes to better monitoring and control of projects and enhancing the likelihood of the success of management information systems. The underlining theories and literature that contribute to the construction of theoretical framework come from general systems theory, complexity theory, and failure studies. One hundred COBOL programs from a single company are used in the analysis. The program log clearly documents the date, time, and the reasons for changes to the programs. In this study the relationships among the variables of business requirements change, software complexity, program size and the error rate in each phase of software development life cycle are tested. Interpretations of the hypotheses testing are provided as well. The data shows that analysis error and design error occur more often than programming error. Measurement criteria need to be developed at each stage of the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Business Intelligence Success: An Empirical Evaluation of the Role of BI Capabilities and the Decision Environment

Business Intelligence Success: An Empirical Evaluation of the Role of BI Capabilities and the Decision Environment

Date: August 2010
Creator: Işik, Öykü
Description: Since the concept of business intelligence (BI) was introduced in the late 1980s, many organizations have implemented BI to improve performance but not all BI initiatives have been successful. Practitioners and academicians have discussed the reasons for success and failure, yet, a consistent picture about how to achieve BI success has not yet emerged. The purpose of this dissertation is to help fill the gap in research and provide a better understanding of BI success by examining the impact of BI capabilities on BI success, in the presence of different decision environments. The decision environment is a composition of the decision types and the way the required information is processed to aid in decision making. BI capabilities are defined as critical functionalities that help an organization improve its performance, and they are examined in terms of organizational and technological capabilities. An online survey is used to obtain the data and partial least squares path modeling (PLS) is used for analysis. The results of this dissertation suggest that all technological capabilities as well as one of the organizational capabilities, flexibility, significantly impact BI success. Results also indicate that the moderating effect of decision environment is significant for quantitative data quality. These ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Client/Server Systems Performance Evaluation Measures Use and Importance: a Multi-Site Case Study of Traditional Performance Measures Applied to the Client/Server Environment

Client/Server Systems Performance Evaluation Measures Use and Importance: a Multi-Site Case Study of Traditional Performance Measures Applied to the Client/Server Environment

Date: May 1999
Creator: Posey, Orlando Guy
Description: This study examines the role of traditional computing performance measures when used in a client/server system (C/SS) environment. It also evaluates the effectiveness of traditional computing measures of mainframe systems for use in C/SS. The underlying problem was the lack of knowledge about how performance measures are aligned with key business goals and strategies. This research study has identified and evaluated client/server performance measurements' importance in establishing an effective performance evaluation system. More specifically, this research enables an organization to do the following: (1) compare the relative states of development or importance of performance measures, (2) identify performance measures with the highest priority for future development, (3) contrast the views of different organizations regarding the current or desired states of development or relative importance of these performance measures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Critical success factors in data mining projects.

Critical success factors in data mining projects.

Date: August 2003
Creator: Sim, Jaesung
Description: The increasing awareness of data mining technology, along with the attendant increase in the capturing, warehousing, and utilization of historical data to support evidence-based decision making, is leading many organizations to recognize that the effective use of data is the key element in the next generation of client-server enterprise information technology. The concept of data mining is gaining acceptance in business as a means of seeking higher profits and lower costs. To deploy data mining projects successfully, organizations need to know the key factors for successful data mining. Implementing emerging information systems (IS) can be risky if the critical success factors (CSFs) have been researched insufficiently or documented inadequately. While numerous studies have listed the advantages and described the data mining process, there is little research on the success factors of data mining. This dissertation identifies CSFs in data mining projects. Chapter 1 introduces the history of the data mining process and states the problems, purposes, and significances of this dissertation. Chapter 2 reviews the literature, discusses general concepts of data mining and data mining project contexts, and reviews general concepts of CSF methodologies. It also describes the identification process for the various CSFs used to develop the research framework. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Defining the information security posture: An empirical examination of structure, integration, and managerial effectiveness.

Defining the information security posture: An empirical examination of structure, integration, and managerial effectiveness.

Date: August 2008
Creator: Young, Randall Frederick
Description: The discipline of information security management is still in its infancy as evidenced by the lack of empirical scholarly work in this area. Most research within the information security domain focuses on specific technologies and algorithms and how it impacts the principles of confidentiality, integrity, and availability. But, an important area receiving little attention is the antecedents of effective information security management at the organizational level (Stanton, Guzman, Stam & Caldera, 2003). The little empirical research that has been conducted in this area has shown that information security management in many organizations is poor (Baskerville, 1993; Shimeall & McDermott, 1999). Several researchers have identified the need for methods to measure the organization-wide information security posture of organizations (Eloff & Von Solms, 2000; James, 1996). This dissertation attempts to measure the organization-wide information security posture by examining benchmark variables that assess role, planning orientation, and performance structure within the organization. Through this conceptualization of an organization's information security posture, a means is presented to measure overall information security and how it impacts the effective utilization of information security strategies. The presence of the dependent variable, effectiveness, gives academics and practitioners a success measure which can guide more effective decision making in ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Design for Social Presence and Exploring Its Mediating Effect in Mobile Data Communication Services

Design for Social Presence and Exploring Its Mediating Effect in Mobile Data Communication Services

Date: May 2011
Creator: Ogara, Solomon Omondi
Description: The mobility, flexibility, convenience, and ubiquity of mobile data services (MDS) have contributed to their enormous growth and popularity with users. MDS allow users to communicate through mobile texting (mTexting), mobile Instant Messaging (mIM), multimedia messaging services (MMS), and email. A unique feature of MDS that enhances its popularity among its users is the awareness capability, which is revolutionizing the way MDS is being used to communicate today. It allows potential communication partners to socialize through these technologies. This dissertation explored the relationship between user experience, perceived richness, perceived social presence and satisfaction with MDS. A research model for examining the antecedent conditions that influence social presence, richness, social interaction and satisfaction with MDS was developed. Partial least square analysis showed that user experience influenced both social presence and richness. Also supported was the relationship between richness, social presence and satisfaction with MDS. Social presence mediated the relationship between user experience and richness. However, only one dimension of interactivity influenced social presence.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Discrimination of Software Implementation Success Criteria

A Discrimination of Software Implementation Success Criteria

Date: August 1999
Creator: Pryor, Alan N.
Description: Software implementation projects struggle with the delicate balance of low cost, on-time delivery and quality. The methodologies and processes used to create and maintain a quality software system are expensive to deploy and result in long development cycle-time. However, without their deployment into the software implementation life-cycle, a software system will be undependable, unsuccessful. The purpose of this research is to identify a succinct set of software implementation success criteria and assess the key independent constructs, activities, carried out to ensure a successful implementation project. The research will assess the success of a software implementation project as the dependent construct of interest and use the software process model (methodology) as the independent construct. This field research involved three phases: (1) criteria development, (2) data collection, and (3) testing of hypotheses and discriminant analysis. The first phase resulted in the development of the measurement instruments for the independent and dependent constructs. The measurement instrument for the independent construct was representative of the criteria from highly regarded software implementation process models and methodologies, e.g., ISO9000, Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model (SEI CMM). The dependent construct was developed from the categories and criteria from the Delone and McLean (1992) MIS List of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Empirical Research of Decision-making Effectiveness When Using Differing Presentation Formats Under Varying Decision Tasks

Empirical Research of Decision-making Effectiveness When Using Differing Presentation Formats Under Varying Decision Tasks

Date: December 1988
Creator: Hard, Nancy J. (Nancy Jean)
Description: The purpose of this research was to determine if presentation format, given a particular task to be performed, would affect the decision-making process of financial decision makers. The problem motivating this study is the potential for managers to make inefficient decisions when they use reports which are presented inappropriately for a given task.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Enterprise Social Software: an Empirical Assessment of Knowledge Sharing in the Workplace

Enterprise Social Software: an Empirical Assessment of Knowledge Sharing in the Workplace

Date: August 2013
Creator: Harden, Gina
Description: Social software has become pervasive including technologies such as blogs, wikis, and social networking sites. Interactive Web 2.0 technology is distinguished from earlier Internet channels, with content provided not only from the website host, but also and most importantly, user-generated content. These social technologies are increasingly entering the enterprise, involving complex social and psychological aspects as well as an understanding of traditional technology acceptance factors. Organizations trying to reap potential benefits of enterprise social software (ESS) must successfully implement and maintain ESS tools. This research develops a framework for assessing knowledge sharing based on reciprocal determinism theory and augmented with technology acceptance, sociological, and psychological factors. Semi-structured interviews with IT professionals, followed by a written survey of employees using ESS are used to collect data. The hermeneutic circle methodology is used to analyze the interview transcripts and structural equation modeling is used to analyze the survey data. Results show technological advantage has no significant effect on the intention to share knowledge, but community cohesiveness and individual willingness significantly affect knowledge sharing intention and behavior. The study offers a synthesized model of variables affecting knowledge sharing as well as a better understanding of best practices for organizations to consider when implementing ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Exploring Critical Factors in Predicting Post-Adoptive Use of Facebook

Exploring Critical Factors in Predicting Post-Adoptive Use of Facebook

Date: May 2011
Creator: Magro, Michael J.
Description: Social networking applications (SNAs) have experienced a boom in popularity in recent years. Sites like Facebook and MySpace continuously draw new users, and are successful in organizing groups of users around topics of common interest. Among SNAs, Facebook has demonstrably outgrown its rivals growing an estimated 157 percent from 2008 to 2009. Facebook is now estimated to be the fourth largest Internet site in the world, trailing only Google, Microsoft and Yahoo (Schonfeld 2009). This dissertation posits and tests a theoretical model composed of key factors that contribute to post-adoptive use of social networking applications and the relationship of those factors to one another. This study also identifies and clarifies new constructs that were not previously used to measure usage, and further refines the constructs that were previously used so that they better fit social networking applications. The results of this dissertation show that the critical factors of social capital, hedonic enjoyment, perceived usefulness, social influence, satisfaction and attitude have a positive influence on a post-adoptive user's intention to continue using Facebook. The results of this study yielded a structural model for predicting the post-adoptive use of Facebook. This work also developed an instrument for measuring constructs relevant to social ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 NEXT LAST