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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Degree Discipline: Psychology
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Comparative analysis of chronic versus acute stressors and their influence on distress consequences at work

Comparative analysis of chronic versus acute stressors and their influence on distress consequences at work

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Date: August 2000
Creator: Crawford, Julie Schwarz
Description: Workplace stress has been found to be a causal agent of psychological distress consequences in employees. Chronic stressors have been well researched, in particular, role conflict, role ambiguity, and work overload have been extensively studied. A meta-analysis was conducted in order to aggregate past research to gain a better understanding of the impact these stressors have on the psychological distress consequences of depression, tension/anxiety, somatic complaints, and generalized feelings of stress. Only role ambiguity was found to be a significant contributor to psychological distress, in particular to feelings of depression and stress. In general, however, effect sizes for all three stressors were moderate to large. While chronic stressors have been well researched, acute stressors have been widely overlooked. Since research in this area is limited, the Daily Work Hassles Survey was developed and validated in order to analyze the role daily hassles play in the workplace. The survey yielded two factors, Interpersonal Hassles and Task Hassles. The former of which was found to be significantly related to the distress consequences of depression, tension/anxiety, somatic complaints, and general feelings of stress. The ultimate goal of this project was to compare chronic and acute stressors. Results from the daily hassles study were ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Comparing the 2010 and 2011 Appic Match: Applicant Characteristics and Unmatched Applicant Distress

Comparing the 2010 and 2011 Appic Match: Applicant Characteristics and Unmatched Applicant Distress

Date: May 2012
Creator: Hogan, Lindsey R.
Description: The internship is one of the most important components of doctoral training in professional psychology. Given the serious problem of the internship imbalance, applicant and program characteristics that constitute a good “fit” with internship training programs have become of greater interest as securing an internship becomes a more competitive process. This study surveyed internship applicants from programs part of the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology (CUDCP), before and after the 2010 and 2011 match days. Number of interview offers was found to be the factor most consistently associated with successfully matching, and several other applicant characteristics salient to matching and obtaining interview offers were identified, including applicant personality. Additionally, personal accounts, but not empirical evidence, of going unmatched have attested to the psychological distress associated with this event. in the current study, while going unmatched was not found to be equitable to a traumatic stressor, evidence was found to support significant decrease in subjective well-being with respect to immediate distress. Findings are discussed in terms of the predictability of and implications for the match process and internship imbalance, and recommendations are made for future research directions.
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A Comparison between the Self-concept of Visually-impaired Adults and Sighted Adults

A Comparison between the Self-concept of Visually-impaired Adults and Sighted Adults

Date: May 1995
Creator: Martinez, Ramiro, 1964-
Description: Self-concept scores of 19 visually-impaired adults were compared to those of 19 matched sighted adults using the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (TSCS). All participants attended the University of North Texas. Scores were examined against the Vocabulary and Information subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R).
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A Comparison of Change Between Time-Extended Group Counseling and Traditional Group Counseling

A Comparison of Change Between Time-Extended Group Counseling and Traditional Group Counseling

Date: May 1973
Creator: Spurgeon, Gene
Description: The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a time-extended counseling group with a traditional counseling group on the three variables: self-actualization, intimacy, and members' reactions to the group experience.
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A Comparison of Empathic Ability between Business and Psychology Majors

A Comparison of Empathic Ability between Business and Psychology Majors

Date: January 1961
Creator: Sturhahn, Edward M.
Description: This study was undertaken in the belief that students of psychology possess a significantly greater degree of empathic ability than do students of other college majors. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is any significant difference in empathic ability between psychology students and business students as a group.
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A Comparison of Miranda Procedures: The Effects of Oral and Written Administrations on Miranda Comprehension

A Comparison of Miranda Procedures: The Effects of Oral and Written Administrations on Miranda Comprehension

Date: August 2009
Creator: Blackwood, Hayley L.
Description: Millions of custodial suspects waive their rights each year without the benefit of legal counsel. The question posed to psychologists in disputed Miranda waivers is whether this waiver decision was, knowing, intelligent, and voluntary. Mental health professionals must be aware of potential barriers to Miranda comprehension to provide expert opinions regarding a defendant's competency to waive rights. The current study examined how Miranda warning reading level, length, and method of administration affects Miranda comprehension. Recently arrested detainees at Grayson County Jail were administered oral and written Miranda warnings from the Miranda Statements Scale (MSS; Rogers, 2005) to measure their comprehension of the warnings. Surprisingly low levels of Miranda comprehension were found for most warnings. For all warnings at or above 8th grade, a substantial minority (27.1% - 39.6%) of defendants exhibited failed (i.e., < 50% understanding) Miranda comprehension. Regardless of other variables, oral administrations resulted in a substantially larger number of defendants with failed Miranda comprehension. Implications for public policy and clinical practice are discussed.
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A Comparison of Physics and Psychology Majors on FIRO-B Variables

A Comparison of Physics and Psychology Majors on FIRO-B Variables

Date: January 1960
Creator: McCown, John Rae
Description: It is the basic assumption of this study that a relationship exists between the interpersonal needs of inclusion, control, and affection and occupational choice as indicated by college major. Studies in the area of vocational choice have largely dealt with people who are practicing the vocation, leaving doubt as to whether people are attracted to the vocation as a result of need-satisfaction behavior, or whether the people determine their orientation by practicing the occupation. The need for further clarification of these questions was recognized, and this study was an effort to add to the evidence for or against the validity of the concept of interpersonal need satisfaction as a factor in vocational choice.
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A Comparison of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, a New Sleep Questionnaire, and Sleep Diaries

A Comparison of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, a New Sleep Questionnaire, and Sleep Diaries

Date: August 2012
Creator: Sethi, Kevin J.
Description: Self-report retrospective estimates of sleep behaviors are not as accurate as prospective estimates from sleep diaries, but are more practical for epidemiological studies. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the validity of retrospective measures and improve upon them. The current study compared sleep diaries to two self-report retrospective measures of sleep, the commonly used Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and a newly developed sleep questionnaire (SQ), which assessed weekday and weekend sleep separately. It was hypothesized that the new measure would be more accurate than the PSQI because it accounts for variability in sleep throughout the week. The relative accuracy of the PSQI and SQ in obtaining estimates of total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), and sleep onset latency (SOL) was examined by comparing their mean differences from, and correlations with, estimates obtained by the sleep diaries. Correlations of the PSQI and SQ with the sleep diaries were moderate, with the SQ having significantly stronger correlations on the parameters of TST, SE, and sleep quality ratings. The SQ also had significantly smaller mean differences from sleep diaries on SOL and SE. The overall pattern of results indicated that the SQ performs better than the PSQI when compared to sleep ...
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A Comparison of the Relative Ego Strengths of Two Prison Groups and a Non-Prison Group as Measured by the IES Test

A Comparison of the Relative Ego Strengths of Two Prison Groups and a Non-Prison Group as Measured by the IES Test

Date: January 1966
Creator: Stevenson, David Michael
Description: This study was concerned with the differences between two types of prisoners on a personality dimension and differences between these prison groups an a non-prison population. The impetus for this study stemmed from the development of a new test designed to scientifically measure the Freudian concept of the personality structures, the id, ego, and superego.
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A Comparison of the Social Acceptance of Learning Disability and Normal Children for Three Teaching Models

A Comparison of the Social Acceptance of Learning Disability and Normal Children for Three Teaching Models

Date: May 1973
Creator: Polo, Linda
Description: The problem of this study concerned the sociometric status of learning disability (LD) and normal children in the classroom. More specifically, the degree of cross choosing between LD and normal children was compared for three different teaching models.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries