You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: School of Music
 Degree Level: Doctoral
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Adaptation of Handel's Castrato Airs for Bass: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, W. Mozart, M. Ravel, G. Finzi, R. Schumann, A. Caldara, G. Handel, H. Wolf, H. Duparc, C. Ives and S. Barber and an Operatic Role by Verdi

Adaptation of Handel's Castrato Airs for Bass: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, W. Mozart, M. Ravel, G. Finzi, R. Schumann, A. Caldara, G. Handel, H. Wolf, H. Duparc, C. Ives and S. Barber and an Operatic Role by Verdi

Date: May 1986
Creator: Fern, Terry L. (Terry Lee)
Description: The lecture recital was given on April 18, 1977. The subject was Adaptation of Handel's Castrato Airs for Bass, and it included a discussion of conventions peculiar to Handelian opera seria, concerns regarding adaptation of Handel's castrato airs and a comparison of adaptation practices in eighteenth- and twentieth-century presentations of Handel's operas. Three coloratura castrato airs and two virtuoso bass airs were performed at the conclusion of the lecture. In addition to the lecture recital, one operatic role and three recitals of solo literature for voice, piano and chamber ensemble were publicly performed. These included the role of "Samuele" in A Masked Ball, by Verdi, performed in English on March 19, 1975 with the Opera Theatre of North Texas State University, a program presented on November 24, 1975,of solo literature for voice, piano, and chamber ensemble, including works by J. S. Bach, W. Mozart, M. Ravel and G. Finzi, a program consisting of a set of works by R. Schumann presented on June 27, 1985, and a program presented on October 28, 1985,of solo literature for voice, piano, and chamber ensemble,including works by A. Caldara, G. Handel, H. Wolf, H. Duparc, C. Ives and S. Barber.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Aesthetic Justifications for Music Education: a Theoretical Examination of Their Usefulness

Aesthetic Justifications for Music Education: a Theoretical Examination of Their Usefulness

Date: December 1988
Creator: Paul, Stephen John
Description: Justifications for music education have been studied only by examining historical trends in statements of aesthetic versus utilitarian values, and not from the perspective of evaluating the justifications' usefulness. A number of prominent writers in the music education field, while supporting aesthetic values as important for music education, have expressed doubts about the effectiveness of aesthetic justifications when used for convincing outsiders of the importance of music in the public school curriculum. These doubts, along with a preponderance of aesthetic justifications in the recent music education literature, led to the present study, which conducted a theoretical examination of the usefulness of aesthetic justifications for music education. The study addressed three research problems, namely: (1) the attitudes of the clientele groups of the public schools in terms of their values toward music as a subject in the schools; (2) the attitudes of the groups within the music education profession in terms of their values for music in the public schools and for the profession itself; and 3) the likelihood that justifications based upon "aesthetics" as a system of values would be accepted by the groups both inside arid outside the music education profession. A philosophical-sociological perspective was chosen for the theoretical ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Archetypal Dreams

Archetypal Dreams

Date: August 1987
Creator: Hanson, Dan L.
Description: In the composition Archetypal Dreams, musical imagery is created through motifs and ideas that represent the symbolic messages of the unconscious. These motifs are introduced, developed, transformed, and overlapped in contrapuntal dialogue. This unfolding of material grows in significance and complexity building to a resolution of tension. The relationship of motifs to the row is re-established and the row is reconstructed. In this manner the conscious and unconscious elements of the personality are symbolically reconciled. The four movements of the work are entitled: I. Primordial Images; II. Archaic Remnants; III. Mythological Motifs; IV. The Process of Individuation
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Aspects of a Late Style in Sergei Rachmaninoff's Variations on a Theme of Corelli, Op. 42: a Lecture Recital, together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J. Brahms, L. v. Beethoven, F. Chopin, C. Debussy, Zoltan Kodaly, M. Moussorgsky, and S. Prokofiev

Aspects of a Late Style in Sergei Rachmaninoff's Variations on a Theme of Corelli, Op. 42: a Lecture Recital, together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J. Brahms, L. v. Beethoven, F. Chopin, C. Debussy, Zoltan Kodaly, M. Moussorgsky, and S. Prokofiev

Date: May 1989
Creator: Ruttle, Mark
Description: This document identifies elements of a stylistic change which occurred in several of the pieces Rachmaninoff wrote during the last years of his life. These elements reflect a progressive trend in his music, which certainly maintained in spite of the change, its characteristic sound. The Variations on a Theme of Corelli, Op. 42 illustrate these new developments in their lean, angular unison sonorities, stripped of chordal padding and virtuosic display, in their percussive, staccato and incisive ostinato rhythmic figures, astringent chromatic harmony and modern air of detachment. The Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 confirms this stylistic development in its remarkable similarity to the Corelli Variations. In the last twenty-six years of his life in exile from his homeland, making his way around the world as a concert pianist, Rachmaninoff wrote only six major works. Perhaps his increasing age, separation from homeland, and the musical revolutions surrounding him in the Western world produced this stylistic development.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Beethoven's Transcendence of the Additive Tendency in Opus 34, Opus 35, Werk ohne Opuszahl 80, and Opus 120

Beethoven's Transcendence of the Additive Tendency in Opus 34, Opus 35, Werk ohne Opuszahl 80, and Opus 120

Date: December 1989
Creator: Kramer, Ernest J. (Ernest Joachim)
Description: The internal unity of the themes in a sonata-allegro movement and the external unity of the movements in a sonata cycle are crucial elements of Beethoven's compositional aesthetic. Numerous theorists have explored these aspects in Beethoven's sonatas, symphonies, quartets, and concertos. Similar research into the independent variation sets for piano, excluding Opus 120, has been largely neglected as the result of three misconceptions: that the variation sets, many of which were based on popular melodies of Beethoven's time, are not as worthy of study as his other works; that the type of hidden internal relationships which pervade the sonata cycle are not relevant to the variation set since all variations are, by definition, related to the theme; and that variations were composed "additively," that is, one after another, without any particular regard for their order or relationship to one another. The purpose of this study is to refute all three of these incorrect assumptions. Beethoven was concerned with the order of variations and their relationship to one another, and he was able to transcend the additive tendency in a number of ways. Some of his methods included registral connection, registral expansion, rhythmic acceleration, textural expansion, dynamics, articulation, and motivic similarities. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Beginnings of Music in the Boston Public Schools: Decisions of the Boston School Committee in 1837 and 1845 in Light of Religious and Moral Concerns of the Time

The Beginnings of Music in the Boston Public Schools: Decisions of the Boston School Committee in 1837 and 1845 in Light of Religious and Moral Concerns of the Time

Date: August 1989
Creator: Miller, David Michael, 1951-
Description: The research problems of this dissertation were: 1) A description of the perceived value of music in light of political undercurrents in Boston prior to and during the years under investigation, and 2) the profile of the constituency of the Boston School Committee and Committee on Music in 1837 and 1845. Questions addressed the effect of religious and moral concerns of the day on the decision by the School Committee in 1837 to try music in the curriculum, and the possible effect of religious politics on Lowell Mason's dismissal from the schools in 1845. In the minds of mid-nineteenth century Bostonians, religious and moral values were intrinsic to the very nature of music. Key members on the School Committee portrayed music as being spiritual yet nonsectarian in its influence. Therefore, the findings suggest that music was believed to provide common ground between opposing and diverse religious sects. Reasons given for Mason's dismissal by John Sargent, a member of the Committee on Music, showed parallels to H. W. Day's accusations in the press a year earlier that Mason had managed his position in a sectarian manner. Sargent's background supports the theory that religious politics were at work in Mason's dismissal. Although ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
British Pastoral Style and E.J. Moeran's Fantasy Quartet: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, B. Britten, L. Foss, G. Handel, A. Marcello, E. Rubbra, C. Saint-Saens, and Others

British Pastoral Style and E.J. Moeran's Fantasy Quartet: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, B. Britten, L. Foss, G. Handel, A. Marcello, E. Rubbra, C. Saint-Saens, and Others

Date: August 1986
Creator: Perkins, Tedrow Lewis
Description: British musical style changed dramatically after 1880 primarily due to factors which may be subsumed under the general heading of nationalism. This change from an essentially Germanic style has been termed the British musical renaissance by many writers on the subject. Within this new musical language, several distinctive substyles arose. One of these, British pastoral style, has been alluded to by Frank Howes and others, but these allusions do not contribute to an understanding of the works purportedly belonging to that style. It is the purpose of this study to define British pastoral style and examine its relation to the British musical renaissance. The method employed for defining style will be that of Jan LaRue's as described in his Guidelines for Style Analysis. What is British pastoral style? Judging from the literature, British pastoral style is a type of British music written between 1900 and 1950 which evokes pastoral images, especially those associated with the British landscape. A stylistic analysis of selected works will define British pastoral style through enumeration and discussion of the style's musical constituents. A more refined definition of British pastoral style is achieved by an in-depth analysis of E. J. Moeran's Fantasy Quartet, which represents a ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Capriccio, By Richard Strauss and Clemens Krauss: Theoretical Discussion as Theatrical Presentation, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Strauss, Wagner, Verdi, Mozart, Britten, and Prokofiev

Capriccio, By Richard Strauss and Clemens Krauss: Theoretical Discussion as Theatrical Presentation, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Strauss, Wagner, Verdi, Mozart, Britten, and Prokofiev

Date: August 1986
Creator: Saunders, David Harold
Description: In Capriccio. Richard Strauss and Clemens Krauss examine the very nature of opera with the core of their thesis being the relationship of words and music. A work that is, in essence, an extended discussion poses two problems to the composer and librettist: how to sustain the argument of the thesis without losing the attention of the audience, and how to prevent a conversational opera from sounding like endless recitative. Strauss and Krauss manage to present their case without having to resort to an actual discussion for the duration of the opera. Their characters are engaging, identifiable human beings who are also allegorical figures. Their participation in the stage action sustains the argument of the thesis even when the dialogue itself addresses other subjects. The players symbolize various facets of opera, theatre, and the public with all of them, principal and secondary characters, being sharply etched. The little stage action that Capriccio does contain is carefully paced and closely coordinated with the presentation of the work's thesis. The octets, similar in dramatic function to the central finale of a Mozart opera buffa, provide the climax of the stage action and come soon after the Fugal Debate, the centerpiece of the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Comparison of the Transcription Techniques of Godowsky and Liszt as Exemplified in Their Transcriptions of Three Schubert Lieder

A Comparison of the Transcription Techniques of Godowsky and Liszt as Exemplified in Their Transcriptions of Three Schubert Lieder

Date: December 1987
Creator: Cloutier, David, 1948-
Description: This investigation sought to compare the transcription techniques of two pianist-composers, Godowsky and Liszt, using three Schubert lieder as examples. The lieder were "Das Wandern" from Die Schöne Müllerin, "Gute Nacht" from Winterreise, and "Liebesbotschaft" from Schwanengesang. They were compared using four criteria: tonality, counterpoint, timbral effects, and harmony. Liszt, following a practice common in the nineteenth century, was primarily concerned with bringing new music into the home of the domestic pianist. The piano transcription was the most widely used and successful medium for accomplishing this. Liszt also frequently transcribed pieces of a particular composer in order to promulgate them by featuring them in his recitals. The Schubert lieder fall into this category. Liszt did not drastically alter the original in these compositions. Indeed, in the cases of "Liebesbotschaft" and "Das Wandern," very little alteration beyond the incorporation of the melody into the piano accompaniment, occurs.Godowsky, in contrast, viewed the transcription as a vehicle for composing a new piece. He intended to improve upon the original by adding his own inspiration to it. Godowsky was particularly ingenious in adding counterpoint, often chromatic, to the original. Examples of Godowsky's use of counterpoint can be found in "Das Wandern" and "Gute Nacht." ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
English Devotional Song of the Seventeenth Century in Printed Collections from 1638 to 1693: A Study of Music and Culture

English Devotional Song of the Seventeenth Century in Printed Collections from 1638 to 1693: A Study of Music and Culture

Date: May 1986
Creator: Treacy, Susan
Description: Seventeenth-century England witnessed profound historical, theological, and musical changes. A king was overthrown and executed; religion was practiced fervently and disputed hotly; and English musicians fell under the influence of the Italian stile nuovo. Many devotional songs were printed, among them those which reveal influences of this style. These English-texted sacred songs for one to three solo voices with continuo--not based upon a previously- composed hymn or psalm tune—are emphasized in this dissertation. Chapter One treats definitions, past neglect of the genre by scholars, and the problem of ambiguous terminology. Chapter Two is an examination of how religion and politics affected musical life, the hiatus from liturgical music from 1644 to 1660 causing composers to contribute to the flourishing of devotional music for home worship and recreation. Different modes of seventeenth-century devotional life are discussed in Chapter Three. Chapter Four provides documentation for use of devotional music, diaries and memoirs of the period revealing the use of several publications considered in this study. Baroque musical aesthetics applied to devotional song and its raising of the affections towards God are discussed in Chapter Five. Chapter Six traces the influence of Italian monody and sacred concerto on English devotional song. The earliest ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT LAST