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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Communication Studies
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Poppin' Their Thang: African American Blueswomen and Multiple Jeopardy

Poppin' Their Thang: African American Blueswomen and Multiple Jeopardy

Date: August 1997
Creator: Wright, Delane E. (Delane Elizabeth)
Description: This ethnographic analysis examines the life stories and lyrics of four African blues singers. Specifically, it compares the cultural themes that emerge their life stories to the cultural themes at emerge from their commercially released music. The findings suggest that the singers recognize, to varying degrees, the impact of racism, sexism, and classism on their personal and careers. These same themes, however, are not present in the lyrics of the music that they choose to sing. Both the stories and the lyrics reveal internal inconsistencies that mirror one another. The conclusion suggests that the inconsistencies within their stories and music are consistent with their liminal position with regard to dominant and subordinate cultures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Purification Rhetoric: A Generic Analysis of Draft Card, Flag, and Cross Burning Cases

Purification Rhetoric: A Generic Analysis of Draft Card, Flag, and Cross Burning Cases

Date: May 1995
Creator: Pollard, Donald Kent
Description: This thesis assesses three United States Supreme Court opinions, engaging in an inductive approach to generic criticism, in an attempt to discover whether or not there are similarities and/or differences in these decisions. This study focuses on draft card, flag, and cross burning cases argued before the Court in order to discover the potential genre's characteristics.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Social Drama at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary : The Dilday Controversy

Social Drama at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary : The Dilday Controversy

Date: December 1995
Creator: Drake, Webster F. (Webster Ford)
Description: This study examines the events surrounding the firing of Russell Dilday at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary as a social drama. The results suggest that, for application to post-industrial cultures, adaptations need to be made to Victor Turner's original method. The addition of Thomas Farrell's anticipation phase, identification of the breach with the transgression, and examination of unique facets of post-industrial cultures such as economic factors and the role of the media are recommended modifications. In light of these differences, the study concludes that the state of affairs at Southwestern is characteristic of schism in a post-industrial culture.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Study of the Relationships Among Relational Maintenance Strategies, Sexual Communication Strategies and Romantic Relational Satisfaction

A Study of the Relationships Among Relational Maintenance Strategies, Sexual Communication Strategies and Romantic Relational Satisfaction

Date: August 1996
Creator: Lundquist, Keeley M. (Keeley Marie)
Description: This thesis examined 199 college students' reported use of relational maintenance strategies and their reports of the occurrence of sexual communication strategies within the relationship with their partners' reported relational satisfaction.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Study of the Relationships among Student Expectations about Teacher Nonverbal Immediacy, Student Perceptions of Teacher Nonverbal Immediacy, and Affective Learning in Distance Learning and the On-Site Classroom

A Study of the Relationships among Student Expectations about Teacher Nonverbal Immediacy, Student Perceptions of Teacher Nonverbal Immediacy, and Affective Learning in Distance Learning and the On-Site Classroom

Date: July 1997
Creator: Witt, Paul L.
Description: This thesis explored the relationships among three communication variables in college-level instruction: students' expectancy about teachers' nonverbal immediacy, students' actual perceptions of teachers' nonverbal immediacy, and students' affective learning. Community college students enrolled in either distance learning or a traditional classroom course completed pre-course and mid-course questionnaires to indicate their expectations and observations of the nonverbal immediacy behaviors of their teachers. Analysis showed that students expected and perceived less nonverbal immediacy from tele-course teachers than from on-site teachers, but that perceptions significantly exceeded expectations. Research findings indicated that students' expectancies about teachers' nonverbal immediacy may influence the measurement of affective learning.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Enacting Racism: Clarence Thomas, George Bush, and the Construction of Social Reality

Enacting Racism: Clarence Thomas, George Bush, and the Construction of Social Reality

Date: May 1995
Creator: Ramsey, Evelyn Michele Eaton
Description: This study analyzes the confirmation hearings discourse of Clarence Thomas and George Bush. Language constructs social reality. The United States has a history of racism and this history manifests itself in our language. The discourse of Clarence Thomas and George Bush created a social reality that equated opposition to Thomas' confirmation with racism using rhetorical strategies that included metaphor and narrative construction.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
An Analysis of Gay/Lesbian Instructor Identity in the Classroom

An Analysis of Gay/Lesbian Instructor Identity in the Classroom

Date: May 2008
Creator: Giovanini, Heather
Description: In this project I explore the connection between cultural and personal identity in the college classroom. Respondent interviews were conducted using open-ended questions, which began with a broad picture of the role the instructor played in the classroom and then focused more specifically on the issue of sexual orientation and the choices to disclose or not disclose orientation in the classroom. Thematic analysis was used to examine the interviews, upon the completion of the interviews being transcribed. RQ1: Do gay and lesbian instructors disclose their sexual orientation in the classroom? From this question, four themes emerged. These themes were disclosure not relevant, out of the classroom disclosure, students just know, and disclosure in the classroom. RQ2: What reasons do gay and lesbian instructors give for disclosing their sexual orientation in the classroom? Two themes, fears of disclosure and holding back, transpired from this question. RQ3: How do gay and lesbian instructors foster diversity in the classroom related to sexual orientation? Four themes were exposed from the question, and these themes were paradox of diversity, passing, mentoring, and identity not sexuality.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Deleuze, Femininity and the Specter of Poststructural Politics: Variations on the Materiality of Rhetoric

Deleuze, Femininity and the Specter of Poststructural Politics: Variations on the Materiality of Rhetoric

Date: December 2004
Creator: May, Matthew S.
Description: In this thesis I rethink the materiality of rhetoric in a minor key. I review poststructural and psychoanalytic endeavors to position rhetoric from within the postmodern and poststructural critique of the subject. I move beyond the logic of influence (dependent on a flawed conception of object) and hermeneutics (the correspondingly flawed methodology). In this endeavor, I primarily enlist Deleuze and Guattari (1987) for a conceptual apparatus that enlivens the "thinness" of rhetoric's (neo)Aristotelian conceptual design (cf. Gaonkar, 1997a, 1997b). I offer Monster (2003) as a case study, analyzing the discursive expression of nondiscursive abstract machines to draw out the reterritorializations of the latter. Recognizing the impossibility of complete reterritorialization I map one artifact that reinvests difference in itself, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Finally, in the epilogue I provide a brief recapitulation of minor politics, and offer a summarization of the utility of rhetoric.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
We've Only Just Begun: A Black Feminist Analysis of Eleanor Smeal's National Press Club Address

We've Only Just Begun: A Black Feminist Analysis of Eleanor Smeal's National Press Club Address

Date: August 2000
Creator: Tate, Tara L.
Description: The voices of black women have traditionally been excluded from rhetorical scholarship, both as a subject of study and as a methodological approach. Despite the little attention black feminist thought has received, black women have long been articulating the unique intersection of oppressions they face and have been developing critical epistemologies.This study analyzes the National Press Club address given by NOW President Eleanor Smeal utilizing a black feminist methodological approach. The study constructs a black feminist theory for the communication discipline and applies it to a discursive artifact from the women's liberation movement. The implications of the study include the introduction of a new methodological approach to the communication discipline that can expand the liberatory reach of its scholarship.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
What's Real Anymore: A Comparison of World of Warcraft, SecondLife and Online Experiences

What's Real Anymore: A Comparison of World of Warcraft, SecondLife and Online Experiences

Date: May 2009
Creator: Tran, Chris
Description: The proliferation of the Internet and online-based social interactions has become an increasingly popular topic with communication scholars. The goal of this study was to explore how massively multi-player online role playing game (MMORPG) players make sense of and negotiate their online social interactions. This study (N = 292) examined how players of SecondLife and World of Warcraft evaluated their online relationships compared to their offline relationships and investigated how different levels of realism within different MMORPGs effected player's online experiences. The results indicated that players of SecondLife placed higher values of emotional closeness to their online relationships when compared to players of World of Warcraft and SecondLife was rated more real by its players than World of Warcraft. Results further indicated that players of SecondLife had higher levels of perceived online emotional closeness when compared to perceived offline emotional closeness. Implications of this study focus on developing a bottom up holistic profile of online game players as opposed to the current top down research model.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries