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  Partner: UNT Libraries
 Department: Department of Computer Science
 Language: English
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
A Programming Language For Concurrent Processing

A Programming Language For Concurrent Processing

Date: August 1972
Creator: Jackson, Portia M.
Description: This thesis is a proposed solution to the problem of including an effective interrupt mechanism in the set of concurrent- processing primitives of a block-structured programming language or system. The proposed solution is presented in the form of a programming language definition and model. The language is called TRIPLE.
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Using Normal Deduction Graphs in Common Sense Reasoning

Using Normal Deduction Graphs in Common Sense Reasoning

Date: May 1992
Creator: Munoz, Ricardo A. (Ricardo Alberto)
Description: This investigation proposes a powerful formalization of common sense knowledge based on function-free normal deduction graphs (NDGs) which form a powerful tool for deriving Horn and non-Horn clauses without functions. Such formalization allows common sense reasoning since it has the ability to handle not only negative but also incomplete information.
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Efficient Linked List Ranking Algorithms and Parentheses Matching as a New Strategy for Parallel Algorithm Design

Efficient Linked List Ranking Algorithms and Parentheses Matching as a New Strategy for Parallel Algorithm Design

Date: December 1993
Creator: Halverson, Ranette Hudson
Description: The goal of a parallel algorithm is to solve a single problem using multiple processors working together and to do so in an efficient manner. In this regard, there is a need to categorize strategies in order to solve broad classes of problems with similar structures and requirements. In this dissertation, two parallel algorithm design strategies are considered: linked list ranking and parentheses matching.
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Multiresolutional/Fractal Compression of Still and Moving Pictures

Multiresolutional/Fractal Compression of Still and Moving Pictures

Date: December 1993
Creator: Kiselyov, Oleg E.
Description: The scope of the present dissertation is a deep lossy compression of still and moving grayscale pictures while maintaining their fidelity, with a specific goal of creating a working prototype of a software system for use in low bandwidth transmission of still satellite imagery and weather briefings with the best preservation of features considered important by the end user.
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Intrinsic and Extrinsic Adaptation in a Simulated Combat Environment

Intrinsic and Extrinsic Adaptation in a Simulated Combat Environment

Date: May 1995
Creator: Dombrowsky, Steven P. (Steven Paul)
Description: Genetic algorithm and artificial life techniques are applied to the development of challenging and interesting opponents in a combat-based computer game. Computer simulations are carried out against an idealized human player to gather data on the effectiveness of the computer generated opponents.
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A Theoretical Network Model and the Incremental Hypercube-Based Networks

A Theoretical Network Model and the Incremental Hypercube-Based Networks

Date: May 1995
Creator: Mao, Ai-sheng
Description: The study of multicomputer interconnection networks is an important area of research in parallel processing. We introduce vertex-symmetric Hamming-group graphs as a model to design a wide variety of network topologies including the hypercube network.
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Symplectic Integration of Nonseparable Hamiltonian Systems

Symplectic Integration of Nonseparable Hamiltonian Systems

Date: May 1996
Creator: Curry, David M. (David Mason)
Description: Numerical methods are usually necessary in solving Hamiltonian systems since there is often no closed-form solution. By utilizing a general property of Hamiltonians, namely the symplectic property, all of the qualities of the system may be preserved for indefinitely long integration times because all of the integral (Poincare) invariants are conserved. This allows for more reliable results and frequently leads to significantly shorter execution times as compared to conventional methods. The resonant triad Hamiltonian with one degree of freedom will be focused upon for most of the numerical tests because of its difficult nature and, moreover, analytical results exist whereby useful comparisons can be made.
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A Unifying Version Model for Objects and Schema in Object-Oriented Database System

A Unifying Version Model for Objects and Schema in Object-Oriented Database System

Date: August 1997
Creator: Shin, Dongil
Description: There have been a number of different versioning models proposed. The research in this area can be divided into two categories: object versioning and schema versioning. In this dissertation, both problem domains are considered as a single unit. This dissertation describes a unifying version model (UVM) for maintaining changes to both objects and schema. UVM handles schema versioning operations by using object versioning techniques. The result is that the UVM allows the OODBMS to be much smaller than previous systems. Also, programmers need know only one set of versioning operations; thus, reducing the learning time by half. This dissertation shows that UVM is a simple but semantically sound and powerful version model for both objects and schema.
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Exon/Intron Discrimination Using the Finite Induction Pattern Matching Technique

Exon/Intron Discrimination Using the Finite Induction Pattern Matching Technique

Date: December 1997
Creator: Taylor, Pamela A., 1941-
Description: DNA sequence analysis involves precise discrimination of two of the sequence's most important components: exons and introns. Exons encode the proteins that are responsible for almost all the functions in a living organism. Introns interrupt the sequence coding for a protein and must be removed from primary RNA transcripts before translation to protein can occur. A pattern recognition technique called Finite Induction (FI) is utilized to study the language of exons and introns. FI is especially suited for analyzing and classifying large amounts of data representing sequences of interest. It requires no biological information and employs no statistical functions. Finite Induction is applied to the exon and intron components of DNA by building a collection of rules based upon what it finds in the sequences it examines. It then attempts to match the known rule patterns with new rules formed as a result of analyzing a new sequence. A high number of matches predict a probable close relationship between the two sequences; a low number of matches signifies a large amount of difference between the two. This research demonstrates FI to be a viable tool for measurement when known patterns are available for the formation of rule sets.
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Computational Complexity of Hopfield Networks

Computational Complexity of Hopfield Networks

Date: August 1998
Creator: Tseng, Hung-Li
Description: There are three main results in this dissertation. They are PLS-completeness of discrete Hopfield network convergence with eight different restrictions, (degree 3, bipartite and degree 3, 8-neighbor mesh, dual of the knight's graph, hypercube, butterfly, cube-connected cycles and shuffle-exchange), exponential convergence behavior of discrete Hopfield network, and simulation of Turing machines by discrete Hopfield Network.
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