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 Department: Department of English
 Year: 2004
 Degree Discipline: English as a Second Language
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Past tense marking in Chinese-English interlanguage.

Past tense marking in Chinese-English interlanguage.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2004
Creator: Flahive, Patrick J.
Description: This data study concentrates on the past tense marking in the interlanguage (IL) of Chinese speakers of English. Following the assumptions of Hawkins & Lizska, (2003), it is assumed that unlike native speakers of English, Chinese speakers of English have a higher level of optionality within the past tense marking of their grammars. It is claimed that the primary reason for this occurrence is the lack of the functional feature T(ense) [+/-past] in Mandarin Chinese. If a particular functional feature is missing in a learner's L1 grammar, it is thought that it will be absent in one's L2 grammar as well. Three advanced Chinese speakers of English were tested on the past tense marking in their IL production. Both spontaneous oral and reading speech were used for this data analysis.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Speaking up! Adult ESL students' perceptions of native and non-native English speaking teachers.

Speaking up! Adult ESL students' perceptions of native and non-native English speaking teachers.

Date: December 2004
Creator: Torres, Julie West
Description: Research to date on the native versus non-native English speaker teacher (NEST versus non-NEST) debate has primarily focused on teacher self-perception and performance. A neglected, but essential, viewpoint on this issue comes from English as a second language (ESL) students themselves. This study investigated preferences of adults, specifically immigrant and refugee learners, for NESTs or non-NESTs. A 34-item, 5-point Likert attitudinal survey was given to 102 students (52 immigrants, 50 refugees) enrolled in ESL programs in a large metropolitan area in Texas . After responding to the survey, 32 students volunteered for group interviews to further explain their preferences. Results indicated that adult ESL students have a general preference for NESTs over non-NESTs, but have stronger preferences for NESTs in teaching specific skill areas such as pronunciation and writing. There was not a significant difference between immigrants' and refugees' general preferences for NESTs over non-NESTs based on immigration status.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries