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 Country: Austria
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
The Prostitution of Self-Determination by Hitler in Austria

The Prostitution of Self-Determination by Hitler in Austria

Date: January 1955
Creator: Bates, Stephen S.
Description: The right of national independence, which came to be called the principle of self-determination, is, in general terms, the belief that each nation has a right to constitute an independent state and determine its own government. It will be the thesis of this paper to show that the Nazi regime under the rule of Adolph Hitler took this principle as its own insofar as its relations with other nations were concerned, but while they paid lip service to the principle, it was in fact being prostituted to the fullest degree in the case of Austria and the Anschluss of 1938.
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Purchasing Power Parity and the Efficient Markets: the Recent Empirical Evidence

Purchasing Power Parity and the Efficient Markets: the Recent Empirical Evidence

Date: December 1988
Creator: Yuyuenyongwatana, Robert P. (Robert Privat)
Description: The purpose of the study is to empirically determine the relevance of PPP theory under the traditional arbitrage and the efficient markets (EPPP) frameworks during the recent floating period of the 1980s. Monthly data was collected for fifteen industrial nations from January 1980 to December 1986. The models tested included the short-run PPP, the long-run PPP, the EPPP, the EPPP with deviations from expectations, the forward rates as unbiased estimators of future spot rates, the EPPP and the forward rates, and the EPPP with forward rates and lagged values. A generalized regression method called Seemingly Unrelated Regression (SUR) was employed to test the models. The results support the efficient markets approach to PPP but fail to support the traditional PPP in both the short term and the long term. Moreover, the forward rates are poor and biased predictors of the future spot rates. The random walk hypothesis is generally supported.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries