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 Department: Department of Psychology
 Degree Discipline: Health Psychology/Behavioral Medicine
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Assessing the Psychological Impact of Fertility Treatment

Assessing the Psychological Impact of Fertility Treatment

Date: August 1997
Creator: McKenna, Kenneth A. (Kenneth Allen)
Description: This controlled descriptive study was designed to investigate the psychological status of couples who are engaged in advanced fertility treatments. A battery of psychological test instruments, including the Millon Behavioral Health Inventory (MBHI), the Health Attribution Test (HAT), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS), was used to measure psychological variables that have been shown in the infertility research literature to be associated with the psychological experiences of infertility patients. The scores from the four assessment instruments were compared with those of pregnant couples in childbirth education classes to differentiate the impact of stress associated with fertility treatment from the stress experienced by third trimester pregnant couples. Eighty-five subjects (42 male and 43 female) volunteered for the study and completed packets of questionnaires. The groups were designated Treatment (infertile couples) and Control (pregnant couples). The resulting data were collected and analyzed on the basis of group mean scores on the test instruments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Cognitive Dysfunction in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Cognitive Dysfunction in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Date: August 1997
Creator: Niemela-Waller, Kirsi (Kirsi M.)
Description: The purpose of the study was to determine the point prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to investigate its association with corticosteroids and depression. The severity of dysfunction and the pattern of cognitive changes were examined. This study hypothesized that cognitive dysfunction is common in SLE and many previous studies have underestimated its prevalence, partially due to using limited neuropsychological batteries and insensitive test instruments. It was further hypothesized that the pattern of cognitive changes in SLE patients will resemble that observed in subcortical dementias.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Music Training on Electroencephalographic Coherence of Preschool Children

The Effects of Music Training on Electroencephalographic Coherence of Preschool Children

Date: August 1999
Creator: DeBeus, Roger J. (Roger John)
Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music training on electroencephalographic (EEG) coherence of preschool children. EEG coherence is a measurement of brain wave activity that reflects anatomical and neurophysiological parameters and functional connectivity between areas of the brain. Participants were 4- to 6-year-old children divided into two groups: one received music training for 20 minutes twice a week for 10 weeks while the other group served as controls. Nineteen channels of EEG data were collected from each child pre- and post-training. Data were collected from three conditions: eyes-open resting, listening to music, and performing the Object Assembly subtest of the Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence - Revised (1989). The hypothesis was that the music training group would show increased EEG coherence as compared to controls. The EEG data was reduced into seven bandwidths and analyzed separately for each condition. Multiple ANCOVAs were used to factor out pre-test variability and to maximize connectivity changes between the two groups. The dependent measures were the post-QEEG electrode pairs and the covariates were the pre-QEEG electrode pairs. Results indicated the eyes-open and listening to music conditions showed more significant changes between the groups than the Object Assembly ...
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Factors of the Geriatric Depression Scale that may Distinguish between Four Cognitive Diagnostic Groups: Normal, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type, and Vascular Dementia

Factors of the Geriatric Depression Scale that may Distinguish between Four Cognitive Diagnostic Groups: Normal, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type, and Vascular Dementia

Date: December 2009
Creator: Cornett, Patricia F.
Description: The purpose of the current study was to explore the relationship between cognitive status and depression in a sample of geriatric patients. Participants included 282 geriatric patients ranging in age from 65 to 96 years who were classified according to diagnosis as: DAT, VaD, MCI, and Norm. All were referred for neurocognitive testing from the Geriatric Assessment Program (GAP) at the University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) in Fort Worth, Texas. This study sought to identify factor structures for two versions of the GDS using a geriatric sample of cognitively impaired and intact patients. It then compared these factors to each other to determine whether the GDS-15 is truly a shorter version of the GDS-30. These were then compared to a previously determined factor structure. This study explored whether the four-factors of the GDS-30 are able to differentiate cognitive diagnostic groups. Further, this study sought to identify whether the severity of cognitive decline impacted GDS factor score for each of the cognitively impaired groups. Results revealed a two-factor model of the GDS - 15 and a four-factor model with the GDS - 30. The GDS-15 factors did not differ from the first two factors of the GDS-30. Comparison ...
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High-Risk Sexual Behaviors of Young Adults: AIDS Prevention

High-Risk Sexual Behaviors of Young Adults: AIDS Prevention

Date: August 1994
Creator: Bloodgood, Martha Madden
Description: The Health Belief Model was used to study HIV/AIDS beliefs of 419, 18 to 24 year old, never married, sexually active, heterosexual college students and predict their AIDS preventive behaviors from a larger sample of 662 college students. The structural properties of the scales used were evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. Recent preventive behaviors were predicted in a LISREL Structural Equation Modeling analysis.
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Neuropsychological Functioning of Adult Subjects with Diabetic Retinopathy Compared to a Normal Blind Population

Neuropsychological Functioning of Adult Subjects with Diabetic Retinopathy Compared to a Normal Blind Population

Date: August 1994
Creator: McGee-Hall, Joanne M. (Joanne Moore)
Description: To investigate the possibility that chronic diabetes mellitus was related to specific neuropsychological deficits, cognitive functioning was measured in subjects with diabetic retinopathy (without secondary disabilities), and in subjects classified as normal blind adults (also without secondary disabilities). The scores for the two groups were then compared.
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The Relationship Between Hostility and Social Support with Chronic Pain and Health Indicators

The Relationship Between Hostility and Social Support with Chronic Pain and Health Indicators

Date: December 1997
Creator: Witham, Kevin J.
Description: The purposes of the study were to examine the psychosocial variables of hostility and social support, and their independent relationships with resting physiological levels and chronic pain symptoms, and to examine the independent relationships of chronic pain chronicity and social support with hostility.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Self-Other Perceptions under Challenge: a Personal Construct Approach to Hostility and the Type A Behavior Pattern

Self-Other Perceptions under Challenge: a Personal Construct Approach to Hostility and the Type A Behavior Pattern

Date: August 1994
Creator: Bollinger, Hautina K. (Hautina Kay)
Description: The purpose of the study was to determine if exposure to a challenging interpersonal situation would have an adverse impact on intra- and interpersonal constructs. Individual difference variables including level of hostility and anger, Type A behavior, control in social situations, depression and sex were examined as "predictors" of those more likely to be adversely affected by personal challenge. Eighty subjects, 40 male and 40 female, completed questionnaires at a pretesting session including measures of hostility, the Type A behavior pattern, trait anger, exaggerated social control, depression, and self-other constructs. Twenty subjects then participated in a "supportive" role-play condition where the confederate was agreeable and friendly. Sixty subjects participated in a "challenge" role-play condition; the confederate was disagreeable, confrontive, and unpleasant. The posttesting measures were then completed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Validation of the Expanded McCarron-Dial System for Diagnosis of Neuropsychological Dysfunction in Adults

Validation of the Expanded McCarron-Dial System for Diagnosis of Neuropsychological Dysfunction in Adults

Date: August 1998
Creator: Colaluca, Beth
Description: The McCarron-Dial System (MDS) has successfully predicted vocational and independent living outcomes with neuropsychologically disabled individuals receiving rehabilitation services. In addition, preliminary validation studies suggest that the abbreviated MDS is useful for clinical neuropsychological diagnosis. The present study represents part of an ongoing research project aimed at validating the expanded version of the MDS for diagnosis of neuropsychological dysfunction. Specifically, it was hypothesized that the expanded MDS would be able to accurately discriminate between brain-damaged and non-brain-damaged individuals. Accurate diagnosis facilitates rehabilitation efforts for individuals with neuropsychological disabilities and the data profile provided by the expanded version of the MDS can consequently form the basis from which more complete individual treatment and rehabilitation plans can be conceptualized.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries