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  Access Rights: Use restricted to UNT Community
 Year: 2006
 Degree Discipline: Criminal Justice
 Collection: UNT Theses and Dissertations
Accuracy variations in human facial identification based on time of exposure.

Accuracy variations in human facial identification based on time of exposure.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2006
Creator: Cowle, Kenneth M.
Description: This study examined the relationship between time of exposure to the human face and accurate subsequent photo line-up identification. A volunteer group of 124 undergraduate students was divided into three approximately equal sized subgroups. The three groups were then exposed to a video or a portion of a video depicting a theft. Exposure times ranged from two minutes to 30 seconds. The subjects were then given a questionnaire and shown a photo line-up of the mock perpetrator and five foils. Subjects were asked to identify the perpetrator and mark that identification on the questionnaire. Results of the experiment indicated that the longer a subject was exposed the greater the possibility of an accurate identification.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Foot and/or Bicycle Patrols in Major Texas Metropolitan Police Departments

Foot and/or Bicycle Patrols in Major Texas Metropolitan Police Departments

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2006
Creator: Pavlik, Wayne Louis
Description: During the last 25 years in law enforcement in the United States, there has been a universal practice of foot and/or bicycle patrols used to accomplish the goal of police patrol enforcement and the philosophy of community policing in metropolitan areas. These tactics of patrol have also been used in police departments in and around the State of Texas. This report is a research project on six major metropolitan police departments in the State of Texas, analyzing their allocation of foot and/or bicycle patrol units within their urban cities. The study assesses their early history in using these two police tactics to address criminal activity and their progression from foot patrol to bicycle patrol. The findings of this research support the proposition that major Texas police departments have adopted the practices and philosophies of other major urban police departments around the US, by using foot and/or bicycle patrols in their cities. There is evidence that major Texas police departments were using foot patrol during the early 1980s in support of community policing and gradually phased out this practice in the early 1990s to adopt the new enforcement tactic of policing on a bicycle.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries