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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/8-scale powered model of a high-speed bomber with a dual pusher propeller aft of the empennage
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61201/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 4-engine monoplane showing comparison of air-cooled and liquid-cooled engine installations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62601/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 4-engine monoplane showing effects of enclosing the engines in the wing and comparisons of tractor- and pusher-propeller arrangements
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62602/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 6-percent-thick symmetrical circular-arc airfoil having a 30-percent-chord trailing-edge flap at a Mach number of 6.9
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62279/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 6-percent-thick symmetrical double-wedge airfoil at transonic speeds from tests by the NACA wing-flow method
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58214/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 42 degree swept-back wing with aspect ratio 4 and NACA 64(sub 1)-112 airfoil sections at Reynolds numbers from 1,700,000 to 9,500,000
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58024/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 45 deg swept wing fighter airplane model and aerodynamic loads on adjacent stores and missiles at Mach numbers of 1.57, 1.87, 2.16, and 2.53
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53228/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 45 degree swept-back wing with aspect ratio of 3.5 and NACA 2S-50(05)-50(05) airfoil sections
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58041/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 45 degree swept-wing fighter-airplane model and aerodynamic loads on adjacent stores and missiles at Mach numbers of 1.57, 1.87, 2.16, and 2.53
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64099/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 60 degree delta wing having a half-delta tip control at a Mach number of 4.04
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61308/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 68.4 degree delta wing at Mach numbers of 1.6 and 1.9 over a wide Reynolds number range
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59872/
The aerodynamic characteristics of a body in the two-dimensional flow field of a circular-arc wing at a Mach number of 2.01
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63525/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a canard and an outboard-tail airplane model at a Mach number of 2.01
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64138/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a circular cylinder at Mach number 6.86 and angles of attack up to 90 degrees
Pressure-distribution and force tests of a circular cylinder have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.88, a Reynolds number of 129,000, and angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The results are compared with the hypersonic approximation of Grimminger, Williams, and Young and a simple modification of the Newtonian flow theory. An evaluation of the crossflow theory is made through comparison of present results with available crossflow Mach number drag coefficients. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56263/
Aerodynamic Characteristics of a circular cylinder at Mach number of 6.86 and angles of attack up to 90 degrees
Pressure-distribution and force tests of a circular cylinder have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.86, a Reynolds number of 129,000 based on diameter, and angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The results are compared with the hypersonic approximation of Grimminger, Williams, and Young and with a simple modification of the Newtonian flow theory. The comparison of experimental results shows that either theory gives adequate general aerodynamic characteristics but that the modified Newtonian theory gives a more accurate prediction of the pressure distribution. The calculated crossflow drag coefficients plotted as a function of crossflow Mach number were found to be in reasonable agreement with similar results obtained from other investigations at lower supersonic Mach numbers. Comparison of the results of this investigation with data obtained at a lower Mach number indicates that the drag coefficient of a cylinder normal to the flow is relatively constant for Mach numbers above about 4. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62708/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a cruciform-wing missile with canard control surfaces and of some very small span wing-body missiles at a Mach number of 1.41
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60170/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a flying-boat hull having a length-beam ratio of 15 and a warped forebody
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58193/
Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Flying-Boat Hull Having a Length-Beam Ratio of 15, TED No. NACA 2206
An investigation was made in the Langley 300 MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a flying-boat hull of a length-beam ratio of 15 in the presence of a wing. The investigation was an extension of previous tests made on hulls of length-beam ratios of 6, 9, and 12; these hulls were designed to have approximately the same hydrodynamic performance with respect to spray and resistance characteristics. Comparison with the previous investigation at lower length-beam ratios indicated a reduction in minimum drag coefficients of 0.0006 (10 peroent)with fixed transition when the length-beam ratio was extended from 12 to 15. As with the hulls of lower length-beam ratio, the drag reduction with a length-beam ratio of 15 occurred throughout the range of angle of attack tested and the angle of attack for minimum drag was in the range from 2deg to 3deg. Increasing the length-beam ratio from 12 to 15 reduced the hull longitudinal instability by an mount corresponding to an aerodynamic-center shift of about 1/2 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord of the hypothetical flying boat. At an angle of attack of 2deg, the value of the variation of yawing-moment coefficient with angle of yaw for a length-beam ratio of 15 was 0.00144, which was 0.00007 larger than the value for a length-beam ratio of 12. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64179/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a full-span trailing-edge control on a 60 degree delta wing with and without a spoiler at Mach number 1.61
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59959/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a large number of airfoils tested in the variable-density wind tunnel
The aerodynamic characteristics of a large number of miscellaneous airfoils tested in the variable-density tunnel have been reduced to a comparable form and are published in this report for convenient reference. Plots of the standard characteristics are given in tabular form. Included is a tabulation of important characteristics for the related airfoils reported in NACA report 460. This report, in conjunction with NACA report 610, makes available in comparable and convenient form the aerodynamic data for airfoils tested in the variable-density tunnel since January 1, 1931. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65459/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a model of an escape capsule for a supersonic bomber-type airplane at a Mach number of 2.49
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63900/
The aerodynamic characteristics of a model wing having a split flap deflected downward and moved to the rear
Tests were made on a model wing with three different sized split trailing-edged flaps, in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel. The flaps were formed of the lower rear portion of the wing and were rotated downward about axes at their front edges. The lift, drag, and center of pressure were measured with the axis in its original position and also with it moved back in even steps to the trailing edge of the main wing, giving in effect an increase in area. The split flaps when deflected about their original axis locations gave slightly higher maximum lift coefficients than conventional trailing-edge flaps, and the lift coefficients were increased still further by moving the axes toward the rear. The highest value of C(sub L max), which was obtained with the largest flap hinged at 90 per cent of the chord from the leading edge, was 2.52 as compared with 1.27 for the basic wing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54116/
Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Number of Modified NACA Four-Digit-Series Airfoil Sections
Theoretical pressure distributions and measured lift, drag, and pitching moment characteristics at three values of Reynolds number are presented for a group of NACA four-digit-series airfoil sections modified for high-speed applications. The effectiveness of flaps applied to these airfoils and the effect of standard leading-edge roughness were also investigated at one value of Reynolds number. Results are also presented of tests of three conventional NACA four-digit-series airfoil sections. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64893/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a number of modified NACA four-digit-series airfoil sections
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54583/
Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Portion of the Horizontal Tail from a Douglas C-74 Airplane with Fabric-Covered Elevators
A Douglas C-74 airplane, during a test dive at about 0.525 Mach number, experienced uncontrollable longitudinal oscillations sufficient to cause shedding of the outer wing panels and the subsequent crash of the airplane. Tests of a section of the horizontal tail plane from a C-74 airplane were conducted in the Ames 16-foot high-speed wind tunnel to investigate the possibility of the tail as a contributing factor to the accident. The results of the investigations of fabric-covered elevators in various conditions of surface deformation are presented in this report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63785/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail flying-boat hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes
An investigation was made in the Langley 300 mph 7-by 10-foot tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes. For comparison, tests were made on a streamline body simulating the fuselage of a modern transport airplane. The results of the tests, which include the interference effects of a 21-percent-thick support wing, indicated that for corresponding configurations the hull models incorporating a forebody with a length-beam ratio of 7 had lower minimum drag coefficients than the hull models incorporating a forebody with a length-beam ratio of 5. Longitudinal and lateral stability was generally about the same for all hull models tested and about the same as that of a conventional hull. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60512/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail flying-boat hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes
An investigation was made in the Langley 300-mph 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a refined deep-step planing-tail hull with various forebody and afterbody shapes and, for comparison, a streamline body simulating the fuselage of a modern transport airplane. The results of the tests indicated that the configurations incorporating a forebody with a length-beam ratio of 7 had lower minimum drag coefficients than the configurations incorporating a forebody with length-beam ratio of 5. The lowest minimum drag coefficients, which were considerably less than that of a conventional hull and slightly less than that of a streamline body, were obtained on the length-beam-ratio-7 forebody, alone and with round center boom. Drag coefficients and longitudinal- and lateral-stability parameters presented include the interference of a 21-percent-thick support wing. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55709/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a slender cone-cylinder body of revolution at a Mach number of 3.85
An experimental investigation of the aerodynamics of a slender cone-cylinder body of revolution was conducted at a Mach number of 3.85 for angles of attack of 0 degree to 10 degrees and a Reynolds number of 3.85x10(exp 6). Boundary-layer measurements at zero angle of attack are compared with the compressible-flow formulations for predicting laminar boundary-layer characteristics. Comparison of experimental pressure and force values with theoretical values showed relatively good agreement for small angles of attack. The measured mean skin-friction coefficients agreed well with theoretical values obtained for laminar flow over cones. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59055/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a slot-lip aileron and slotted flap for dive brakes
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61438/
The aerodynamic characteristics of a slotted Clark y wing as affected by the auxiliary airfoil position
Aerodynamic force tests on a slotted Clark Y wing were conducted in a vertical wind tunnel to determine the best position for a given auxiliary airfoil with respect to the main wing. A systematic series of 100 changes in location of the auxiliary airfoil were made to cover all the probable useful ranges of slot gap, slot width, and slot depth. The results of the investigation may be applied to the design of automatic or controlled slots on wings with geometric characteristics similar to the wing tested. The best positions of the auxiliary airfoil were covered by the range of the tests, and the position for desired aerodynamic characteristics may easily be obtained from charts prepared especially for the purpose. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66057/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a small-scale shrouded propeller at angles of attack from 0 to 90 degrees
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57798/
The aerodynamic characteristics of a supersonic aircraft configuration with a 40 degree sweptback wing through a Mach number range from 0 to 2.4 obtained from various sources
A summary and analysis have been made of the results of various investigations to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a supersonic aircraft configuration. The configuration has a wing with 40 degree sweepback at the quarter-chord line, aspect ratio 4, taper ratio 0.5, and 10-percent-thick circular-arc sections normal to the quarter-chord line. Experimental data were available for a Mach number range from 0.16 to 2.32. Results obtained from wing-flow, rocket-model, transonic-bump, and tunnel tests are presented and, where possible, are supplemented by empirical and theoretical calculations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59085/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-03R propeller
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64628/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(12)-03 propeller
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64968/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller and of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-045 propeller
Characteristics are given for the two-blade NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller and for the two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-045 propeller over a range of advance ratio from 0.5 to 3.8, through a blade-angle range from 20 degrees to 55 degrees measured at the 0.75 radius. Maximum efficiencies of the order of 91.5 to 92 percent were obtained for the propellers. The propeller with the thinner airfoil sections over the outboard portion of the blades, the NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller, had lower losses at high tip speeds, the difference amounting to about 5 percent at a helical tip Mach number of 1.10. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56670/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with Fowler flaps including flap loads, downwash, and calculated effect on take-off
This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests of a wing in combination with each of three sizes of Fowler flap. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the aerodynamic characteristics as affected by flap chord and position, the air loads on the flaps, and the effect of flaps on the downwash. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66190/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with quarter-chord line swept back 35 degrees, aspect ratio 4, taper ratio 0.6, and NACA 65A006 airfoil section : transonic-bumb method
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58209/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with quarter-chord line swept back 45 degrees, aspect ratio 4, taper ratio 0.6, and NACA 65A006 airfoil section : transonic-bump method
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58242/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with quarter-chord line swept back 45 degrees, aspect ratio 6, taper ratio 0.6, and NACA 65A006 airfoil section
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58328/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with quarter-chord line swept back 45 degrees, aspect ratio 6, taper ratio 0.6, and NACA 65A009 airfoil section
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58527/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with quarter-chord line swept back 60 degrees, aspect ratio 2, taper ratio 0.6, and NACA 65A006 airfoil section : transonic bump method
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58424/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with quarter-chord line swept back 60 degrees, aspect ratio 4, taper ratio 0.6, and NACA 65A006 airfoil section : transonic-bump method
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58370/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with unswept quarter-chord line, aspect ratio 2, taper ratio 0.78, and NACA 65A004 airfoil section : transonic-bump method
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58448/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with unswept quarter-chord line, aspect ratio 4, taper ratio 0.6, and NACA 65A004 airfoil section : transonic-bump method
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58473/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with unswept quarter-chord line, aspect ratio 4, taper ratio 0.6, and NACA 65A006 airfoil section
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58309/
Aerodynamic characteristics of aerofoils I
The object of this report is to bring together the investigations of the various aerodynamic laboratories in this country and Europe upon the subject of aerofoils suitable for use as lifting or control surfaces on aircraft. The data have been so arranged as to be of most use to designing engineers and for the purposes of general reference. The absolute system of coefficients has been used, since it is thought by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics that this system is the one most suited for international use, and yet is one for which a desired transformation can be easily made. For this purpose a set of transformation constants is included in this report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65743/
Aerodynamic characteristics of aerofoils II : continuation of report no. 93
This collection of data on aerofoils has been made from the published reports of a number of the leading aerodynamic laboratories of this country and Europe. The information which was originally expressed according to the different customs of the several laboratories is here presented in a uniform series of charts and tables suitable for the use of designing engineers and for purposes of general reference. The absolute system of coefficients has been used, since it is thought by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics that this system is the one most suited for international use, and yet is one for which a desired transformation can be easily made. For this purpose a set of transformation constants is included in this report. The authority for the results here presented is given as the name of the laboratory at which the experiments were conducted, with the size of the model, wind velocity, and date of test. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65774/
Aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft with reference to their use
Economic and design characteristics are examined in the design of airplanes and airships. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277393/
The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils as affected by surface roughness
The effect on airfoil characteristics of surface roughness of varying degrees and types at different locations on an airfoil was investigated at high values of the Reynolds number in a variable density wind tunnel. Tests were made on a number of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) 0012 airfoil models on which the nature of the surface was varied from a rough to a very smooth finish. The effect on the airfoil characteristics of varying the location of a rough area in the region of the leading edge was also investigated. Airfoils with surfaces simulating lap joints were also tested. Measurable adverse effects were found to be caused by small irregularities in airfoil surfaces which might ordinarily be overlooked. The flow is sensitive to small irregularities of approximately 0.0002c in depth near the leading edge. The tests made on the surfaces simulating lap joints indicated that such surfaces cause small adverse effects. Additional data from earlier tests of another symmetrical airfoil are also included to indicate the variation of the maximum lift coefficient with the Reynolds number for an airfoil with a polished surface and with a very rough one. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54195/
Aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at high speeds
This report deals with an experimental investigation of the aerodynamical characteristics of airfoils at high speeds. Lift, drag, and center of pressure measurements were made on six airfoils of the type used by the air service in propeller design, at speeds ranging from 550 to 1,000 feet per second. The results show a definite limit to the speed at which airfoils may efficiently be used to produce lift, the lift coefficient decreasing and the drag coefficient increasing as the speed approaches the speed of sound. The change in lift coefficient is large for thick airfoil sections (camber ratio 0.14 to 0.20) and for high angles of attack. The change is not marked for thin sections (camber ratio 0.10) at low angles of attack, for the speed range employed. At high speeds the center of pressure moves back toward the trailing edge of the airfoil as the speed increases. The results indicate that the use of tip speeds approaching the speed of sound for propellers of customary design involves a serious loss in efficiency. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65858/