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 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Tests on thrust augmenters for jet propulsion

Tests on thrust augmenters for jet propulsion

Date: September 1, 1932
Creator: Jacobs, Eastman N & Shoemaker, James M
Description: This series of tests was undertaken to determine how much the reaction thrust of a jet could be increased by the use of thrust augmenters and thus to give some indication as to the feasibility of jet propulsion for airplanes. The tests were made during the first part of 1927 at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. A compressed air jet was used in connection with a series of annular guides surrounding the jet to act as thrust augmenters. The results show that, although it is possible to increase the thrust of a jet, the increase is not large enough to affect greatly the status of the problem of the application of jet propulsion to airplanes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests to determine effects of slipstream rotation on the lateral stability characteristics of a single-engine low-wing aircraft model

Tests to determine effects of slipstream rotation on the lateral stability characteristics of a single-engine low-wing aircraft model

Date: September 1, 1946
Creator: Purser, Paul E & Spear, Margaret F
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests to Determine the Adhesive Power of Passenger-Car Tires

Tests to Determine the Adhesive Power of Passenger-Car Tires

Date: August 1, 1956
Creator: Foerster, B.
Description: The concept of the adhesive power of a tire with respect to the road involves several properties which result from the purpose of the tire; namely, connecting link between vehicle and road: (1) The tire must transfer the tractive and braking forces acting in the direction of travel (tractive and braking adhesion); (2) The tire is to prevent lateral deviations of the vehicle from the desired direction of travel (track adhesion). Moreover, the rubber tire provides part of the springing of the vehicle. Above all, it has to level out the minor road irregularities; thus it smoothes, as it were, the road and simultaneously reduces the noise of driving. The springing properties of the tire affect the adhesive power. The tests described below comprise a determination of the braking and track adhesion of individual tires. The adhesion of driven wheels has not been investigated so far.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests to determine the effect of heat on the pressure drop through radiator tubes

Tests to determine the effect of heat on the pressure drop through radiator tubes

Date: July 1, 1947
Creator: Habel, Louis W & Gallagher, James J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests with hydrogen fuel in a simulated afterburner

Tests with hydrogen fuel in a simulated afterburner

Date: July 2, 1956
Creator: Dangle, E. E. & Kerslake, W. R.
Description: Hydrogen fuel combustion analysis in simulated afterburner.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests with hydrogen fuel in a simulated afterburner

Tests with hydrogen fuel in a simulated afterburner

Date: July 2, 1956
Creator: Kerslake, W R & Dangle, E E
Description: An investigation was conducted in a 16-inch-diameter simulated afterburner using gaseous hydrogen fuel. No flameholder was used with a multipoint fuel injector. The burner length was varied from 9.5 to 38 inches. The afterburner-inlet conditions were: temperature of 1200 degrees or 1500 degrees F, pressure of 14 to 44 inches mercury absolute, and velocity of 300 to The measured combination efficiency ranged from 85 to 98 percent over an equivalence-ratio range of 0.2 to 1.0. The cold-flow pressure-drop coefficient was 1.0 for the system. Spontaneous ignition was always possible at temperatures above 1200 degrees F but was not possible at temperatures above 1200 degrees F but was not possible below 1100 degrees F for all pressures and velocities tested.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Theoretical additional span loading characteristics of wings with arbitrary sweep, aspect ratio, and taper ratio

Theoretical additional span loading characteristics of wings with arbitrary sweep, aspect ratio, and taper ratio

Date: December 1, 1947
Creator: Deyoung, John
Description: The Weissinger method for determining additional span loading has been used to find the lift-curve slope, spanwise center of pressure, aerodynamic center location, and span loading coefficients of untwisted and uncambered wings having a wide range of plan forms characterized by various combinations of sweep, aspect ratio, and taper ratio. The results are presented as variations of the aerodynamic characteristics with sweep angle for various values of aspect ratio and taper ratio. Methods are also included for determining induced drag and the approximate effects of compressibility. Despite the limitations of a lifting line method such as Weissinger's, the good agreement found between experimentally and theoretically determined characteristics warrants confidence in the method. In particular, it is believed that trends observed in results of the Weissinger method should be reliable. One of the most significant results showed that for each angle of sweep there is a taper ratio for which aspect ratio has little effect on the span loading and for which the loading is practically elliptical. This elliptic loading is approached at a taper ratio of 1.39 for 30 degree of sweepforward, 0.45 for zero degree of sweepback. (author).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Theoretical aerodynamic characteristics of a family of slender wing-tail-body combinations

Theoretical aerodynamic characteristics of a family of slender wing-tail-body combinations

Date: November 1, 1951
Creator: Lomax, Harvard & Byrd, Paul F
Description: The aerodynamic characteristics of an airplane configuration composed of a swept-back, nearly constant chord wing and a triangular tail mounted on a cylindrical body are presented. The analysis is based on the assumption that the free-stream Mach number is near unity or that the configuration is slender. The calculations for the tail are made on the assumption that the vortex system trailing back from the wing is either a sheet lying entirely in the plane of the flat tail surface or has completely "rolled up" into two point vortices that lie either in, above, or below the plane of the tail surface.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Theoretical aerodynamic characteristics of bodies in a free-molecule-flow field

Theoretical aerodynamic characteristics of bodies in a free-molecule-flow field

Date: July 1, 1951
Creator: Stalder, Jackson R & Zurick, Vernon J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Theoretical aerodynamic coefficients of two-dimensional supersonic biplanes

Theoretical aerodynamic coefficients of two-dimensional supersonic biplanes

Date: June 1, 1947
Creator: Moeckel, W E
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department