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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
St. Petersburg: Water Resources
Map showing hydrologic resources (point source discharges, tide stations, sediment, tidal currents, etc.) in the St. Petersburg region of the Tampa Bay, Florida coastline area. Scale 1:24,000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66600/
Stability and control characteristics at high subsonic speeds of a 1/30-scale model of the mx-1554a design
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53103/
Stability and control characteristics at low speed of a 1/4-scale Bell X-5 airplane model : longitudinal stability and control
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58350/
Stability and control characteristics at low speed of a 1/5-scale model of the EDO 142 hydro-ski research airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58899/
Stability and control characteristics at low speed of a 1/10-scale model of mx-1554a design
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53099/
Stability and control characteristics at low speed of a 1/10-scale model of MX-1554A design
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59507/
Stability and control characteristics at low speed of a modified 1/10-scale model of the mx-1554a design
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53102/
Stability and control characteristics at low speed of a modified 1/10-scale model of the MX-1554A design
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65039/
Stability and control characteristics at low speed of an airplane model having a 38.7 degree sweptback wing with aspect ratio 4.51, taper ratio 0.54, and conventional tail surfaces
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54856/
Stability and control characteristics obtained during demonstration of the Douglas X-3 research airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61367/
Stability and control characteristics of a 1/4-scale Bell X-5 airplane model in the landing configuration
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58634/
Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/10-Scale Model of the McDonnell XP-85 Airplane While Attached to the Trapeze
At the request of the Air Materiel Command, Army Air Forces, an investigation of the low-speed, power-off, stability and control characteristics of the McDonnell XP-85 airplane has been conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. The results of the portion of the investigation consisting of tests of a 1/10-scale model to study the stability of the XP-85 when attached to the trapeze and during retraction into the B-36 bomb bay are presented herein. In the power-off condition the stability was satisfactory with all oscillations well damped and the nose-restraining collar could be placed in position without difficulty. In a simulated power-on condition the model had a constant-amplitude rolling and sidewise motion and when the collar was layered, a violent motion resulted if the collar struck the model but failed to hold it in the proper manner. Folding of the wings and retraction into the bomb bay offered no problem once the airplane was properly held by the collar. It is recommended that the power be cut immediately after hooking on and that a restricting mechanism be incorporated in the center of the trapeze to eliminate the sidewise motion. It also appears desirable to have the retracting procedure controlled by the XP-85 pilot or an observer in the mother ship to insure that the parasite is in proper position after hooking up before bringing the collar down. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64184/
Stability and control characteristics of a complete airplane model having a wing with quarter-chord line swept back 40 degrees, aspect ratio 2.50, and taper ratio 0.42
An investigation has been made of a complete airplane model having a wing with the quarter-chord line swept back 40 degrees, aspect ratio 2.50, and taper ratio 0.42 to determine its low-speed stability and control characteristics. The longitudinal stability investigation included stabilizer and tail-off tests with different wing dihedral angles (Gamma = 0 degrees and Gamma = -10 degrees) over an angle-of-attack range for the cruising and landing configurations and tests. with a high horizontal-tail location (Gamma = -10 degrees) for the cruising configuration. Tests were made of the wing alone and to determine the effect of wing end plates in pitch. Lateral stability characteristics were determined for the airplane with different geometric wing dihedrals, with end plates, and with several dorsal modifications. Tests were made with ailerons and spoilers to determine control characteristics. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55718/
Stability and control characteristics of a fighter airplane in inverted flight attitude as determined by model tests
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60999/
Stability and control characteristics of a free-flying model with an unswept wing of aspect ratio 3 (XS-3)
The results of power-off force tests and flight tests of a model with a thin unswept low-aspect-ratio wing are presented. The tests were made with the flaps retracted and deflected. The effects on the lateral flight characteristics of decreasing directional stability were noted. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57832/
Stability and control data obtained from first flight of X-4 airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64643/
Stability and Control Data Obtained from Fourth and Fifth Flights of the Northrop X-4 Airplane (A.F. No. 46-676)
NACA instrumentation has been installed in the Northrop X-4 airplane to obtain stability and control data during the Northrop conducted acceptance tests. The results of the fourth and fifth flights of the Northrop X-4 number 1 airplane are presented in this paper. These data were obtained for a center-of-gravity position of approximately 19.5 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord. The results of this flight showed that the directional stability as measured in steadily increasing sideslips was positive and high and that the effective dihedral was positive. The results also show the airplane to be longitudinally stable, stick fixed, with the center of gravity at 19.5 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58301/
Stability and control flight tests of a 0.13-scale model of the consolidated-Vultee XFY-1 airplane in take-offs, landings, and hovering flight : TED No. NACA DE 368
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59405/
Stability and Control Flight Tests of a Vertically Rising Airplane Model Similar to the Lockheed XFV-1 Airplane
This paper presents the results of an investigation of the dynamic stability and controllability of a model which approximately represents the Lockheed XFV-1 airplane to a 1/8 scale. The investigation consisted of hovering flights in still air at a considerable height above the ground, hovering flights very close to the ground, vertical take-offs and landings, flights through the transition range from hovering to normal forward flight, and sideways translational flights. The model could be flown smoothly and easily in hovering flight despite the fact that the uncontrolled pitching and yawing motions were unstable oscillations. There was a noticeable reduction in the controllability of the model when hovered very close to the ground but take-offs could be made easily and landings on a g,ven spot could be made accurately in spite of this adverse ground effect. Flights through the transition range from hovering to normal forward flight could be performed fairly easily. The model seemed to have stability of angle of attack and angle of roll over most of the transition range. The yawing motion was divergent in the very high angle-of-attack range but could be controlled easily. At the lower angles of attack, the model seemed to become stable in yaw. In sideways flight there was an increasingly strong tendency to diverge in roll as the speed was increased and finally, at a speed of about 25 knots (full scale), the model rolled off despite efforts of the pilot to control it. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65344/
Stability and control force tests of four- and six-unit wing designs of low aspect ratio and 20 degree triangular plan form
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62680/
Stability and control measurements obtained during USAF-NACA cooperative flight-test program on the X-4 airplane (USAF No. 46-677)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58987/
Stability and control tests of a 3/4-scale model of the XP-69 airplane in the NACA full-scale tunnel
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61031/
Stability and drag characteristics of 1/10-scale model of the Convair XF2Y-1 airplane with open inlets containing boundary layer splitter plates as obtained in free flight at Mach numbers between 0.7 and 1.5 : TED No. NACA DE 365
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61248/
Stability characteristics at low speed of a 1/4-scale Bell X-5 airplane model with various modifications to the basic model configurations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58515/
Stability characteristics at low speed of a variable-sweep airplane model having a partially cambered wing with several chord-extension configurations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60106/
Stability derivatives at supersonic speeds of thin rectangular wings with diagonals ahead of tip Mach lines
The investigation includes steady and accelerated vertical and longitudinal motions and steady rolling, yawing, sideslipping, and pitching for Mach numbers and aspect ratios greater than those for which the Mach line from the leading edge of the tip section intersects the trailing edge of the opposite tip section. The stability derivatives are derived with respect to principal body axes and then transformed to a system of stability axes. Theoretical results are obtained, by means of the linearized theory, for the surface-velocity-potential functions, surface-pressure distributions, and stability derivatives for various motions at supersonic speeds of thin flat rectangular wings without dihedral. In the case of yawing, a treatment for the infinitely long wing which takes account of the spanwise variation in the stream Mach number is extended to the finite wing, and a plausible, although not rigorous, solution is obtained for the wing tip effects. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60239/
Stability derivatives of cones at supersonic speeds
The aerodynamic stability derivatives due to pitching velocity and vertical acceleration are derived for circular cones traveling at supersonic speeds. Both first-order and a combination of first and second order potential solutions are obtained, and in calculations for the forces, no approximations are made to the tangency condition or the isentropic pressure relation. In addition, expressions for the forces, moments, and stability derivatives of arbitrary bodies of revolution are derived from Newtonian impact theory. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56055/
The stability derivatives of low-aspect-ratio triangular wings at subsonic and supersonic speeds
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54308/
Stability derivatives of thin rectangular wings at supersonic speeds : wing diagonal ahead of tip mach lines
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55389/
Stability derivatives of triangular wings at supersonic speeds
The analysis of the stability derivatives of low-aspect-ratio triangular wings at subsonic and supersonic speeds, given in NACA TN no. 1423, is extended to apply to triangular wings having large vertex angles and traveling at supersonic speeds. The lift, rolling moment due to sideslip, and damping in roll and pitch for this more general case have been treated elsewhere on the basis of the theory of small disturbances. The surface potentials for angle of attack and rolling taken therefrom are used to obtain the several side-force and yawing-moment derivatives that depend on leading-edge suction, and a tentative value for the rolling moment due to yawing. The lift and moment due to downward acceleration are obtained on the basis of an unpublished unsteady-flow solution. All the known stability derivatives of the triangular wing at supersonic speeds, regardless of source, are summarized for convenience and presented with respect to both body axes and stability axes. The results are limited to Mach numbers for which the triangular wing is contained within the Mach cone for its vertex. The spanwise variation of Mach number in the case of yawing is neglected, although the effect must be of importance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60217/
Stability derivatives of triangular wings at supersonic speeds
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54898/
Stability equations for airship hulls
In the text are derived simple formulae for determining, directly from the data of wind tunnel tests of a model of an airship hull, what shall be the approximate character of oscillation, in pitch or yaw, of the full-scale airship when slightly disturbed from steady forward motion. (author). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65864/
Stability investigation of a blunt cone and a blunt cylinder with a square base at Mach numbers from 0.64 to 2.14
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64415/
Stability limits and burning velocities for some laminar and turbulent propane and hydrogen flames at reduced pressure
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57515/
Stability limits and burning velocities of laminar hydrogen-air flames at reduced pressure
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56071/
Stability of a body stabilized by fins and suspended from an airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62405/
Stability of airplanes
The author attempts to correct the misconception that piloting an airplane requires extraordinary skill and balance. He also tries to show that airplanes are extremely stable in flight. Some of the major points covered in this article include: automatic pilots, airplanes designed to be stable, and the reliance on mathematics to help in designing stable aircraft. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55228/
Stability of Alclad plates
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55379/
Stability of ballistic reentry bodies
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53206/
Stability of bodies of revolution having fineness ratios smaller than 1.0 and having rounded fronts and blunt bases
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59468/
Stability of Castering Wheels for Aircraft Landing Gears
A theoretical study was made of the shimmy of castering wheels. The theory is based on the discovery of a phenomenon called kinematic shimmy. Experimental checks, use being made of a model having low-pressure tires, are reported and the applicability of the results to full scale is discussed. Theoretical methods of estimating the spindle viscous damping and the spindle solid friction necessary to avoid shimmy are given. A new method of avoiding shimmy -- lateral freedom -- is introduced. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66346/
Stability of Castering Wheels for Aircraft Landing Gears, Special Report
In many installations of castering rubber-tired wheels there is a tendency for the wheel to oscillate violently about the spindle axis. This phenomenon, popularly called 'shimmy,' has occurred in some airplane tail wheels and has been corrected in two ways: first by the application of friction in the spindles of the tail wheels; and, second, by locking the wheels while taxiing at high speeds. Shimmy is common with the large wheels used as nose wheels in tricycle landing gears and, since it is impossible to lock the wheels, friction in the nose-wheel spindle has been the sole means of correction. Because the nose wheel is larger than the conventional tail wheel and usually carries a greater load, the larger amounts of spindle friction necessary to prevent shimmy are objectionable. the present paper presents a theoretical and experimental study of the problem of the stability of castering wheels for airplane landing gears. On the basis of simplified assumptions induced from experimental observations, a theoretical study has been made of the shimmy of castering wheels. The theory is based on the discovery of a phenomenon called 'kinematic shimmy' and is compared quantitatively with the results of model experiments. Experimental checks, using a model having low-pressure tires, are reported and the applicability of the results to full scale is discussed. Theoretical methods of estimating the spindle viscous damping and spindle solid friction necessary to avoid shimmy - lateral freedom - is introduced. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65046/
Stability of Cylindrical and Conical Shells of Circular Cross Section, with Simultaneous Action of Axial Compression and External Normal Pressure
We consider in this report the determination of the upper limit of critical loads in the case of simultaneous action of a compressive force, uniformly distributed over plane cross sections, and of isotropic external normal pressure on cylindrical or conical shells of circular cross section. As a starting point we use the differential equations for neutral equilibrium of conical shells which have been used for the solution of the problem of stability of conical shells under torsion and under axial compression; upon solution of the problem it is possible to satisfy all boundary conditions, in contrast to the report where no attention is paid to the fulfillment of the boundary conditions, and to the report where only part of the boundary conditions are satisfied by solution of the problem according to Galerkin's method. Approximate formulas are used for the determination of the critical external normal pressure with simultaneous action of longituninal compression. Let us note that the formulas suggested in reference 5 are not well founded and may lead, in a number of cases, to a substantial mistake in the magnitude of the critical load. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63878/
Stability of elastically supported columns
A criterion is developed for the stiffness required of elastic lateral supports at the ends of a compression member to provide stability. A method based on this criterion is then developed for checking the stability of a continuous beam-column. A related method is also developed for checking the stability of a member of a pin-jointed truss against rotation in the plane of the truss. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56593/
The Stability of Isotropic or Orthotopic Cylinders or Flat or Curved Panels, Between and Across Stiffeners, with Any Edge Conditions Between Hinged and Fixed, Under Any Combination of Compression and Shear
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54753/
Stability of laminar boundary layer near a stagnation point over an impermeable wall and a wall cooled by normal fluid injection
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56409/
The stability of laminar flow past a sphere
As a contribution to the problem of turbulence on a surface of rotation, the method of small oscillation is applied to the flow past a sphere. It was found that the method developed for two-dimensional flow is applicable without modifications. The frictional layer in the vicinity of the stagnation point of a surface of rotation is less stable against small two-dimensional disturbances than in the stagnation point itself, as proved from an analysis of the velocity distribution made by Homann. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63088/
The stability of orthotropic elliptic cylinders in pure bending
The theoretical critical bending stress of elliptic cylindrical shells is determined on the assumption of infinite shell length and absence of local instability phenomena. The results of the tests on isotropic elliptic cylindrical shells stressed in bending are compared with the theoretical results. The practical applicability of the theory is discussed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63359/
Stability of Plates and Shells Beyond the Proportional Limit
In the present paper is examined the method of investigating the stability of plates and shells beyond the elastic limit, that proceeds from the generalization of the Hencky-Mises theory of elastico-plastic deformations given in the works of Smirnov-Alyayev, Schmidt, and in our papers. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64330/
Stability of propane-air flames in vortex flow
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57074/