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 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Tests of the Northrop XB-62 missile in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

Tests of the Northrop XB-62 missile in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

Date: September 27, 1954
Creator: Graham, D.
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of the Northrop XSSM-A-3 Missile in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: Wing Modifications

Tests of the Northrop XSSM-A-3 Missile in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: Wing Modifications

Date: January 5, 1950
Creator: Graham, David
Description: Wind-tunnel tests were conducted to determine the longitudinal stability characteristics of a full-scale Northrop XSSM-A-3 missile. Various wing modifications were investigated in an effort to provide a configuration that would maintain longitudinal stability to lift coefficients necessary for landing the missile during flight tests. The results of the tests led to the choice of a wing with an increased leading-edge radius. A short discussion of the results is presented, but no analysis of the data has been made in order to make the data available as soon as possible.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of Thermal-Electric De-Icing Equipment for Propellers

Tests of Thermal-Electric De-Icing Equipment for Propellers

Date: January 1, 1944
Creator: Scherrer, Richard & Rodert, Lewis A
Description: Flights were made in natural icing conditions at the NACA Ice Research Project, Minneapolis, Minn. to test several designs of thermal-electric propeller de-icing blade shoes and a hub-generator design. It was found that a minimum average unit power of 2.5 watts per square inch of blade-shoe area would protect the propeller blades at the test conditions. The most satisfactory blade shoe of the three designs tested extended to the 20-percent-chord point and to 90 percent of the blade radius. A concentration of heat in the leading-edge region of this shoe was found to reduce the power input necessary for satisfactory de-icing. A satisfactory thermal design of blade shoe and a hub generator of sufficient capacity were developed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of three tapered airfoils based on the N.A.C.A. 2200, the N.A.C.A.-M6, and the Clark Y sections

Tests of three tapered airfoils based on the N.A.C.A. 2200, the N.A.C.A.-M6, and the Clark Y sections

Date: January 1, 1934
Creator: Anderson, Raymond F
Description: Three tapered airfoils based on the N.A.C.A. 2200, the N.A.C.A.-M6, and the Clark Y sections were tested in the variable-density wind tunnel at a Reynolds Number of approximately 3,100,000. The models, which were of aspect ratio 6, had constant core center sections and rounded tips, and tapered in thickness from 18 percent at the roots to 9 percent at the tips. The aerodynamic characteristics are given by the usual dimensionless coefficients plotted for both positive and negative angles of attack and by effective profile-drag coefficients plotted against lift coefficients.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of Two-Blade Propellers in the Langley 8-Foot High-Speed Tunnel to Determine the Effect on Propeller Performance of a Modification of Inboard Pitch Distribution

Tests of Two-Blade Propellers in the Langley 8-Foot High-Speed Tunnel to Determine the Effect on Propeller Performance of a Modification of Inboard Pitch Distribution

Date: February 1, 1951
Creator: Delano, James B & Carmel, Melvin M
Description: Tests of two propellers having two blades and differing only in the inboard pitch distribution were made in the Langley 8-foot highspeed tunnel to determine the effect of inboard pitch distribution on propeller performance. propeller was designed for operation in the reduced velocity region ahead of an NACA cowling; the inboard pitch distribution of the modified propeller was increased for operation at or near free-stream velocities, such as would be obtained in a pusher installation. conditions covering climb, cruise, and high-speed operation. Wake surveys were taken behind the propellers in order to determine the distribution of thrust along the blades and to aid in the analysis of the results. Test results showed that the modified propeller was about 2.5 percent less efficient for a typical climb condition at all altitudes, 2 percent more efficient for one cruise condition, and 5 percent more efficient for high-speed operation. speed condition, the modified propeller showed a 6-percent loss in efficiency due to compressibility; whereas the original propeller showed an 11-percent efficiency loss due to compressiblity. The lower compressibility loss for the modified propeller resulted from the fact that the inboard sections of this propeller could operate at increased thrust loading after compressibility losses ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of two full-scale propellers with different pitch distributions, at blade angles up to 60 degrees

Tests of two full-scale propellers with different pitch distributions, at blade angles up to 60 degrees

Date: January 1, 1939
Creator: Biermann, David & HARTMAN EDWIN P
Description: Two 3-blade 10-foot propellers were operated in front of a liquid-cooled engine nacelle. The propellers differed only in pitch distribution; one had normal distribution (nearly constant pitch for a blade angle of 15 degrees at 0.75 radius), and the other had the pitch of the tip sections decreased with respect to that for the shank sections (blade angle of 35 degrees for nearly constant pitch distribution). Propeller blade angles at 0.75r from 15 degrees to sixty degrees, corresponding to design speeds up to 500 miles per hour, were investigated. Propeller blade angles at 0.75r from 15 degrees to 60 degrees, corresponding to design speeds up to 500 miles per hour, were investigated. The results indicated that the propulsive efficiency at a blade angle of 60 degrees was about 9 percent less than the maximum value of 86 percent, which occurred at blade angle of about 30 degrees. The efficiency at a blade angle of 60 degrees was increased about 7 percent by correcting for the effect of a spinner and, at a blade angle of 30 degrees about 3 percent. The peak efficiencies for the propeller having the washed-out pitch distribution were slightly less than for the normal propeller but ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of two models representing intermediate inboard and outboard wing sections of the XB-36 airplane

Tests of two models representing intermediate inboard and outboard wing sections of the XB-36 airplane

Date: January 1, 1943
Creator: Bogdonoff, Seymour M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of Wing Machine-Gun and Cannon Installations in the NACA Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, Special Report

Tests of Wing Machine-Gun and Cannon Installations in the NACA Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, Special Report

Date: August 1, 1941
Creator: Czarnecki, K. R. & Guryansky, Eugene R.
Description: At the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, an investigation was conducted in the full-scale wind tunnel of wing installations of .50-caliber machine guns and 20-millimeter cannons. The tests were made to determine the effect of various gun installations on the maximum lift and the high-speed drag of the airplane.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests on a model of the D.F.W. airplane T-29 of the "Deutsche Flugzeug derke" (German airplane works)

Tests on a model of the D.F.W. airplane T-29 of the "Deutsche Flugzeug derke" (German airplane works)

Date: January 1, 1924
Creator: Molthan, Wilhelm
Description: Experiments similar to those carried out with the A.E.G (Allgemeine Elektrizitats-Gesellschaft) were made in the small wind tunnel of the Gottingen laboratory on a model of the D.F.W. airplane T-29. Three series of tests were carried out on the model with a velocity head (or dynamic pressure) of 5 kg/sq m (1.02 lb/sq ft), during which one of the movable surfaces was deflected at various angles, while both the others were retained in their central positions. Of special interest among the results of the tests is the different run of the elevating moments. The curves for the A.E.G. model, rising to the right, denote stability with the elevator locked, while the slight inclination to the left with the D.F.W model denotes a slight instability. For the maximum C(sub L) values, the stability of A.E.G. model continues to increase and the instability of the D.F.W. model is converted into stability. The rolling moments shown when the angular deflection of the ailerons is 0 degrees are due, in both series of tests, to the unequal distribution of the air velocity over the cross section of the wind tunnel, rather than to a lack of symmetry in the model.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests on air propellers in yaw

Tests on air propellers in yaw

Date: January 1, 1923
Creator: Durand, W F & Lesley, E P
Description: This report contains the results of tests to determine the thrust (pull) and torque characteristics of air propellers in movement relative to the air in a line oblique to the line of the shaft, and specifically when such angle of obliquity is large, as in the case of helicopter flight with the propeller serving for both sustentation and traction.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department