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 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Stability of thin-walled tubes under torsion
In this report a theoretical solution is developed for the torsion on a round thin-walled tube for which the walls become unstable. The results of this theory are given by a few simple formulas and curves which cover all cases. The differential equations of equilibrium are derived in a simpler form than previously found, it being shown that many items can be neglected. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66136/
Stability of Tube Rows in Crossflow
A mathematical model for the instability of tube rows subjected to crossflow is examined. The theoretical model, based on the fluid-force data for a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.33, provides additional insight into the instability phenomenon. Tests are also conducted for three sets of tube rows. The effects of mass ratio, tube pitch, damping, detuning and finned tubes are investigated. Theoretical results and experimental data are in good agreement. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283554/
Stability of Tubes Conveying Fluid
Tests and analysis are made for tubes conveying fluid for two types of support conditions. The objectives are to study the characteristics of different types of instability, the transition of one instability mechanism to another, and the control of instability. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc173302/
Stability results obtained with Douglas D-558-1 airplane (BuAero No. 37971) in flight up to a Mach number of 0.89
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57825/
The stability under longitudinal compression of flat symmetric corrugated-core sandwich plates with simply supported loaded edges and simply supported or clamped unloaded edges
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57014/
Stabilization of 50-percent magnesium - JP-4 slurries with some aluminum soaps of C(sub 8) acids
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60320/
Stabilization of Free Radicals at Low Temperatures: Summary of the NBS Program
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13163/
Stabilization techniques for ramp-type side inlets at supersonic speeds
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61107/
Stable Isotopes Division Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending November 30, 1956
Report issued by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discussing progress made by the Stable Isotopes Division. Descriptions of of the progress and studies made are presented. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100309/
The Stage Constants of Cascade Impactors
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13128/
Stagnation-point heat transfer to blunt shapes in hypersonic flight, including effects of yaw
An approximate theory is developed for predicting the rate of heat transfer to the stagnation region of blunt bodies in hypersonic flight. Attention is focused on the case where wall temperature is small compared to stagnation temperature. The theoretical heat-transfer rate at the stagnation point of a hemispherical body is found to agree with available experimental data. The effect of yaw on heat transfer to a cylindrical stagnation region is treated at some length, and it is predicted that large yaw should cause sizable reductions in heat-transfer rate. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57257/
Stagnation temperature recording
The present report deals with the development of a thermometer for recording stagnation temperature in compressible mediums in turbulent flow within 1 to 2 percent error of the adiabatic temperature in the stagnation point, depending upon the speed. This was achieved by placing the junction of a thermocouple near the stagnation point of an aerodynamically beneficial body, special care being taken to assure an uninterrupted supply of fresh compressed air on the junction together with the use of metals of low thermal conductivity, thus keeping heat-transfer and heat-dissipation losses to a minimum. In other experiments the use of the plate thermometer was proved unsuitable for practical measurements by reason of its profound influence in the reading by the Reynolds number and by the direction of flow. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63156/
Stall and flame-out resulting from firing of armament
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61353/
Stall Characteristics Obtained from Flight 10 of Northrop X-4 No. 2 Airplane (USAF No. 46-677)
NACA instrumentation has been installed ii the X-J4 airplanes to obtain stability and control data during the acceptance tests conducted by the Northrop Aircraft Corporation. This report presents data obtained on the stalling characteristics of the airplane in the clean and gear- down configurations. The center of gravity was located at approximately 18 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord during the tests. The results indicated that the airplane was not completely stalled when stall was gradually approached during nominally U accelerated flight but that it was completely stalled during a more abruptly approached stall in accelerated flight. The stall in accelerated flight was relatively mild, and this was attributed to the nature of the variation of lift with angle of attack for the 001-614 airfoil section, the plan form of the wing, and to the fact that the initial sideslip at the stall produced (as shown by wind-tunnel tests of a model of the airplane) a more symmetrical stall pattern. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64873/
Stall-proof airplanes
My lecture has to do with the following questions. Is the danger of stalling necessarily inherent in the airplane in its present form and structure, or can it be diminished or eliminated by suitable means? Do we possess such means or devices and how must they operate? In this connection I will devote special attention to the exhibition of stall-proof airplanes by Fokker under the auspices of the English Air Ministry, which took place in Croyden last April. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65126/
Stall propagation in a cascade of airfoils
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56729/
Stall propagation in axial-flow compressors
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57899/
Stalling characteristics of the Supermarine Spitfire 5A airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61033/
Stalling of helicopter blades
Theoretical studies have predicted that operation of helicopter rotor beyond certain combinations of thrust, forward speed, and rotational speed might be prevented by rapidly increasing stalling of the retreating blade. The same studies also indicate that the efficiency of the rotor will increase until these limits are reached or closely approached, so that it is desirable to design helicopter rotors for operation close to the limits imposed by blade stalling. Inasmuch as the theoretical predictions of blade stalling involve numerous approximations and assumptions, an experimental investigation was needed to determine whether, in actual practice, the stall did occur and spread as predicted and to establish the amount of stalling that could be present without severe vibration or control difficulties being introduced. This report presents the results of such an investigation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60130/
Stalling of helicopter blades
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54841/
Standard atmosphere
This report was prepared at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and discusses the need of a standard set of values of pressure, temperature and density at various altitudes and points out the desirability of adopting such values as are most in accord with actual average conditions, in order that corrections in individual cases may be as small as possible. To meet this need, so far as the united states is concerned, all free-air observations obtained by means of kites and balloons at several stations in this country near latitude 40 degrees N., have been used, and average values of pressure, temperature, and density, based upon those observations, have been determined for summer, winter, and the year, and for all altitudes up to 20,000 meters (65,000 feet). These values are presented in tables and graphs in both metric and english units; and in the tables of densities there are also included values of density for other parts of the world, more particularly for Europe. A comparison with these values shows that, except in the lowest levels, the agreement is very satisfactory. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65798/
Standard atmosphere - tables and data
Detailed tables of pressures and densities are given for altitudes up to 20,000 meters and to 65,000 feet. In addition to the tables the various data pertaining to the standard atmosphere have been compiled in convenient form for ready reference. This report is an extension of NACA-TR-147. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65870/
Standard atmosphere - tables and data for altitudes to 65,800 feet
Report includes calculated detailed tables of pressures and densities of a standard atmosphere in both metric and english units for altitudes from -5,000 meters to 20,000 meters and from -16,500 feet to 65,800 feet. Tables, figures, physical constants, and basic equations are based upon the text, reproduced herein, of the manual of the ICAO standard atmosphere, International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) draft of December 1952. (author). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65571/
Standard Cells: Their Construction, Maintenance, and Characteristics
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13267/
Standard method of graphical presentation of centrifugal compressor performance
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62083/
Standard nomenclature for airspeeds with tables and charts for use in calculation of airspeed
Symbols and definition of various airspeed terms that have been adopted as standard by the NACA subcommittee on aircraft structural design are presented. The equations, charts, and tables required in the evaluation of true airspeed, calibrated airspeed, equivalent airspeed, impact and dynamic pressures, and Mach and Reynolds numbers have been compiled. Tables of the standard atmosphere to an altitude of 65,000 feet and a tentative extension to an altitude of 100,000 feet are given along with the basic equations and constants on which both the standard atmosphere and the tentative extension are based. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60128/
Standard nomenclature for airspeeds with tables and charts for use in calculation of airspeed
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54944/
Standard Practices for Design of MTR and ETR Safety Circuits
Report containing notes for designing safety circuits for the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) and Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67274/
Standard Practices Guide for Writing Experimental Operating Manuals
This is a sample operating manual designed to aid experimenters in writing operating manuals for MTR and ETR experiments. It contains what is felt to be the necessary information for operating a particular experiment. One of the main functions of an operating manual is to provide quick reference to material needed in an emergency. It is believed this type of manual provides the required information without an excessive amount of bulky, surplus material. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc67283/
Standard procedures for rating and testing centrifugal compressors
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62068/
Standard procedures for rating and testing multistage axial-flow compressors
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55004/
Standard symbols for helicopters
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54618/
Standard Test Specimens of Zinc Bronze (Cu 88, Sn 10, Zn 2) - Parts 1 and 2: Part 1. - Preparation of Specifications, Part II. - Microstructure
Technical paper issued by the Bureau of Standards over tests conducted on the preparation of an alloy. The tests conducted, and their results are presented and discussed. This paper includes tables, illustrations, and photographs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66502/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 1. Data for 46 Substances
Report discussing forty-six standard X-ray diffraction powder patterns. Fourteen are to replace twelve patterns already given in the X-ray Powder Data File, and thirty-four are for substances not previously included. The X-ray Powder Data File is a compilation of diffraction patterns from many sources and is used for the identification of unknown crystalline materials by matching spacing and intensity measurements. The patterns were made with a Geiger counter X-ray diffractometer, using samples of high purity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70431/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 2. Data for 37 Substances
Report discussing standard X-ray diffraction powder patterns for thirty-seven substances. Eleven are to replace patterns already given in the X-ray Powder Data File issued by the American Society for Testing and Materials, and twenty-six patterns indicated by asterisks are for substances not previously included. The X-ray Powder Data File is a compilation of diffraction patterns from many sources and is used for the identification of unknown crystalline materials by matching spacing and intensity measurements. The patterns were made with a Geiger counter X-ray diffractometer, using samples of high purity. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc70432/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 3. Data for 51 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13211/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 4. Data for 103 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13212/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 5. Data for 80 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13213/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 6. Data for 60 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13214/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 7. Data for 81 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13215/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 8. Data for 81 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13216/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 9. Data for 63 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13217/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 10. Data for 84 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13202/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 11. Data for 70 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13203/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 12. Data for 57 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13204/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 13. Data for 58 substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13205/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 14. Data for 68 substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13206/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 15. Data for 112 substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13207/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns : Section 16. Data for 86 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13208/
Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns: Section 17. Data for 54 Substances
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13209/