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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Tests of a 1/17-scale model of the XBDR-1 airplane in the NACA gust tunnel

Tests of a 1/17-scale model of the XBDR-1 airplane in the NACA gust tunnel

Date: February 1, 1944
Creator: Reisert, Thomas D
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of a 1/40-scale wing-hull model and a 1/10-scale float-strut model of the Hughes-Kaiser cargo airplane in the two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel

Tests of a 1/40-scale wing-hull model and a 1/10-scale float-strut model of the Hughes-Kaiser cargo airplane in the two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel

Date: September 1, 1943
Creator: Fullmer, Felician F , Jr
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of a 45 degree sweptback-wing model in the Langley gust tunnel

Tests of a 45 degree sweptback-wing model in the Langley gust tunnel

Date: February 1, 1948
Creator: Pierce, Harold B
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of a centering spring used as an artificial feel device on the elevator of a fighter airplane

Tests of a centering spring used as an artificial feel device on the elevator of a fighter airplane

Date: September 12, 1952
Creator: Adams, James J & Whitten, James B
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of a contra-propeller for aircraft

Tests of a contra-propeller for aircraft

Date: November 1, 1938
Creator: Benson, William M
Description: Tests of an 8-blade contra-propeller of 32-inch diameter in combination with a 4-inch, 36-inch diameter adjustable pitch, metal propeller at pitch setting of 15, 25, 35, and 45 degrees at 0.75 R were made. The tests showed a significant increase in effective thrust of the combination over that of the propeller alone for value V/nD somewhat below those for maximum efficiency and without a corresponding increase of power absorbed. From 1/2 percent to 2-1/2 percent in propulsive efficiency was thus gained in this range. In all but one case, however, the peak propulsive efficiency of the combination was found to be from 1 to 2 percent less than that of the propeller alone. Counter torque on the contra-propeller amounted to about 50 percent of the propeller torque.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of a dynamic model in NACA tank number 1 to determine the effect of length of afterbody, angle of afterbody keel, gross load, and a pointed step on landing and planning stability

Tests of a dynamic model in NACA tank number 1 to determine the effect of length of afterbody, angle of afterbody keel, gross load, and a pointed step on landing and planning stability

Date: March 1, 1943
Creator: Lina, Lindsay J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of a full-scale horizontal tail surface in the Langley 16-foot high-speed tunnel

Tests of a full-scale horizontal tail surface in the Langley 16-foot high-speed tunnel

Date: May 1, 1946
Creator: Schueller, Carl F; Korycinski, Peter F & Strass, H Kurt
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of a Full-Scale Model of the Republic XF-91 Airplane in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. Force and Moment Data

Tests of a Full-Scale Model of the Republic XF-91 Airplane in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. Force and Moment Data

Date: May 4, 1949
Creator: Hunten, Lynn W. & Dew, Joseph K.
Description: Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale model of the Republic XF-91 airplane having swept-back wings and a vee tail were conducted to determine both the stability and control characteristics of the model longitudinally, laterally, and directionally. Configurations of the model were investigated involving such variables as external fuel tanks, a landing gear, trailing-edge flaps, leading-edge slats, and a range of wing incidences and tail incidences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of a gust-alleviating flap in the gust tunnel

Tests of a gust-alleviating flap in the gust tunnel

Date: January 1, 1940
Creator: Donely, Philip & Shufflebarger, C C
Description: Tests were made to determine the effectiveness of a long-period dynamically overbalanced flap in reducing airplane accelerations due to atmospheric gusts. For two gust shapes, one gust velocity, one forward velocity, and one wing loading, a series of flights was made with the flap locked and was then repeated with the flap free to operate. The records were evaluated by routine methods. The results indicate that the flap reduced the maximum acceleration increment 39 percent for a severe gust but with a representative gust shape (a sharp-edge gust), the reduction was only 3 percent. The results also indicate that the flap tended to reduce the longitudinal stability of the airplane. Computations made of the effectiveness and the action of the flap were in good agreement with the experimental results.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Tests of a gust-alleviating wing in the gust tunnel

Tests of a gust-alleviating wing in the gust tunnel

Date: April 1, 1941
Creator: Shufflebarger, C C
Description: Tests were made in the NACA gust tunnel to determine the effectiveness of a torsionally flexible wing with the torsion axis ahead of the locus of the section aerodynamic centers in reducing airplane accelerations due to atmospheric gusts. For three gust shapes, a series of flights was made with the airplane model equipped with either a torsionally flexible or a rigid wing. The results indicated that the torsionally flexible wing reduced the maximum acceleration increment 5 percent for the sharp-edge gust and about 17 percent for gust shapes with gradient distances of 6.8 and 15 chord lengths. The analysis indicated that the effectiveness of this method of gust alleviation was independent of the gust velocity and that, for the same total load increment, the torsionally flexible wing would have 10 percent less bending-moment increment at the root section of the wing than a rigid wing in all but the sharpest gusts. The results also indicated that the torsionally flexible wing slightly increased the longitudinal stability of the airplane model in a gust.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department