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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Tank investigation of the hydrodynamic characteristics of a 1/3.33-scale jet-powered dynamic model of the Martin XP6M-1 flying boat with a revised forebody planing bottom : TED No. NACA DE 385
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62000/
Tank investigation of the hydrodynamic characteristics of a 1/13.33-scale jet-powered dynamic model of the Martin XP6M-1 flying boat. : TED No. NACA DE 385
A tank investigation was made of the hydrodynamic characteristics of a 1/13.33-scale jet-powered dynamic model of the 160,000-pound Martin XP6M-1 flying boat. Longitudinal stability during take-off and landing, resistance of the complete model, spray characteristics, flap loads, and effect of sinking speed in smooth and rough water are presented, as well as behavior during taxiing, take-off and landing in rough water. The effect on spray of two bows and several bow-spray-strip modifications and the effect on resistance of afterbody chine strips also are presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60832/
Tank spray tests of a jet-powered model fitted with NACA hydro-skis
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57572/
Tank Tests of 1/5.5-Scale Forward Dynamic Model of the Columbia XJL-1 Amphibian - Langley Tank Model 208, TED No. NACA 2336
Tests of a powered dynamic model of the Columbia XJL-1 amphibian were made in Langley tank no.1 to determine the hydrodynamic stability and spray characteristics of the basic hull and to investigate the effects of modifications on these characteristics. Modifications to the forebody chime flare, the step, and the afterbody, and an increase in the angle of incidence of the wing were included in the test program. The seaworthiness and spray characteristics were studied from simulated taxi runs in smooth and rough water. The trim limits of stability, the range of stable positions of the enter of gravity for take-off, and the landing stability were determined in smooth water. The aerodynamic lift, pitching moment, and thrust were determined at speeds up to take-off speed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64252/
Tank tests of a 1/5 full-size dynamically similar model of the Army OA-9 amphibian with motor-driven propellers : NACA model 117
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61769/
Tank Tests of a 1/7-Size Dynamic Model of the Grumman XJR2F-1 Amphibian to Determine the Effect of Slotted- and Split-Type Flaps on Take-Off Stability - NACA Model 212, TED No. NACA 2378
Additional tests of a 1/7-size model of the Grumman XJR2F-1 amphibian were made in Langley tank no. 1 to compare the behavior during take-off of the model equipped with split- and slotted-type flaps. The slotted flag had a large effect on locating the forward center-of-gravity limits for stable take-offs. Stable take-offs within the normal operating range of positions of the center of gravity could be made with the split flaps deflected 45deg or with the slotted flaps deflected less than 20deg. At flap deflections required for similar take-off stability, the use of split-flaps resulted lower take-off speeds than the use of slotted flaps. An increase in forward acceleration from 1.1 to 4.8 feet per second per second moved the center-of-gravity limit forward approximately 3-percent mean aerodynamic chord. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64241/
Tank Tests of a 1/7-Size Powered Dynamic Model of the Grumman XJR2F-1 Amphibian: Spray Characteristics, Take-Off and Landing Stability in Smooth Water - Langley Tank Model 212, TED No. NACA 2378
Tests of a model of the XJR2F-Y amphibian were made in Langley tank no. to determine the spray characteristics and the take-off and landing stability. At a gross load of 22,000 pounds full size, spray entered the propeller disk only at a very narrow range of speeds. The spray striking the flaps was not excessive and no appreciable wetting of the tail surfaces was noted. The trim limits of stability appeared to be satisfactory and the upper-limit porpoising was not violent. The stable range of center-of-gravity locations with flaps set 20deg was well aft of the desired operating range. However, with flaps up, the forward limit was about 18 percent mean aerodynamic chord and the aft limit about 28.5 percent mean aerodynamic chord at a load of 26,000 pounds and with elevators deflected -10deg. Under these conditions the location of the step is considered satisfactory. Tests showed that the effect of water in the nose-wheel well would be to move the forward limit aft about 2-percent mean aerodynamic chord. Without ventilation of the main step, the model skipped during landing at most trims, but this skipping was not violent. With the ventilation, the model skipped lightly only at trims where the afterbody keel was approximately parallel to the water (around 7.5 deg). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64245/
Tank tests of a 1/8-size dynamic model of the PB2Y-3 airplane with increased power : NACA model 131
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61766/
Tank Tests of a 1/8-Size Dynamic Model of the PB2Y-3 Airplane with Simulated Jet Motors: NACA Models 131J, 131J-1 and 131J-2
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61767/
Tank tests of a 1/8-size powered dynamic model of the Martin PBM-5 seaplane equipped with a single EDO hydro-ski : TED No. NACA AD3110
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61949/
Tank tests of a 1/10-size model of a hypothetical flying boat with a hull length-beam ratio of 9.0
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54637/
Tank tests of a family of flying-boat hulls
This report presents towing tests made in the N.A.C.A. tank of a parent form and five variations of a flying-boat hull. The beams of two of the derived forms were made the same as that of the parent and the lengths changed by increasing and decreasing the spacing of stations. The lengths of the two others of the derived forms were made the same as that of the parent while the beams were changed by increasing and decreasing the spacing of buttocks, all other widths being changed in proportion. The remaining derived form has the same length and beam as the parent, but the lines of the forebody were altered to give a planing bottom with no longitudinal curvature forward of the step. The test data were analyzed to determine the minimum resistance and the angle at which it occurs for all speeds and loads. The results of this analysis are given in the form of non dimensional curves for each model. The effect of variation in over-all size, as indicated by a "complete" test on any given hull, is pointed out. The effect of changing length alone by the spacing of buttocks, as well as the effects of the changes in length-beam ratio and longitudinal curvature that result from these operations are discussed. The difficulties encountered in interpreting test results of systematic families derived by the method used are emphasized. Further studies are suggested in which changes in the variable under consideration would not be obscured by secondary changes in other important variables. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54476/
Tank tests of a flying-boat model equipped with several types of fairing designed to reduce the air drag of the main step
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61763/
Tank tests of a model of a flying-boat hull having a longitudinally concave planing bottom
The NACA model 11-B, which has a longitudinally concave planing bottom forward of the step, was tested over a wide range of loading. The results of the tests are presented as curves of resistance and trimming moment plotted against speed for various trim angles and as curves of resistance coefficient at best trim angle, and trimming-moment coefficient. The characteristics of the form at the optimum trim are compared with those of NACA model 11-C which has the same form with the exception of a planing bottom longitudinally straight near the step. Photographs of the models being towed in the tank are included for a comparison of the spray patterns. At the best angles of trim in each case model 11-B has lower resistance at high speeds, a higher maximum positive trimming moment near the hump speed, and a more favorable spray pattern than of model 11-C. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54225/
Tank tests of a model of a flying-boat hull with a fluted bottom
A 1/5-scale model of a flying-boat hull having flutes in the bottom both forward and aft of the step (NACA model 19) was tested to determine its water performance. The model was also tested after the successive removal of the flutes on the afterbody and forebody. The results from these tests are compared with those from tests of a model of the hull of the Navy PN-8 flying boat and it is concluded that the fluted-bottom model and its modifications are inferior to the model of the PN-8. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54145/
Tank tests of a model of one hull of the Savoia S-55-X flying boat -N.A.C.A. Model 46
A model of one of the twin hulls of the Italian Savoia S-55-X flying boat (N.A.C.A. Model 46) was tested in the N.A.C.A. tank according to the general method. The data obtained from these tests cover a broad range of speeds, loads, and trims and are given in nondimensional form to facilitate their use in applying this form of hull to any other flying boat or comparing it's performance with the performance of any other hulls. The results show that the resistance characteristics at best trim of this model are excellent throughout the speed range. In order to compare the performance of the S-55-X hull with that of the 35, a pointed-step hull developed at the N.A.C.A. tank, the data are used in the computations of take-off example of a twin-hull, 23,500-pound flying boat. The calculations show that the S-55-X hull has better take-off performance. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54467/
Tank tests of a model of the NC flying-boat hull - N.A.C.A. model 44
A 1/7.06 full-size model of the NC-type hull was tested in the N.A.C.A. tank by both the general method and the specific or free-to-trim method. The results of the tests are given in curves plotted as non dimensional coefficients and are compared with the test results of N.A.C.A. model 11-A. The NC model (N.A.C.A. model 44) shows higher resistance than model 11-A at hump speed but lower resistance at high speeds. Model 44 has a higher best trim angle at the jump and a lower maximum positive trimming moment than model 11-A. At high speeds the best trim angle and the trimming moments of the two models are approximately the same. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54170/
Tank tests of a powered dynamic model of a flying boat having an afterbody length-beam ratio of 4.7-Langley tank model 203C-1
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61788/
Tank Tests of a Powered Model of a Compression Plane, NACA Model 171A-2
The compression plane is intended for operation on or close to the surface of the water, and has a hull with a concave bottom which forms the upper surface of a tunnel into which air is forced under pressure to support part of the load. The results of the tests made in Langley tank no. 1 include values of the horizontal forces, trimming moment, and static pressure in the tunnel for a wide range of loads and speeds and two power conditions, and are presented in the form of curves against speed with load as a parameter. The results are scaled up to 10 times the model size for three conditions at which the model is self-propelled at a steady speed. Lift is obtained from the static pressure of air in the tunnel. In general, the ratio of the gross load to the total resistance increases with increase in load and decrease in speed. This ratio varies between l-7 and 5.7 at high speeds and has a maximum value of 7. The total resistance is nearly the same for both power conditions except at low speeds and heavy loads. No abrupt change in forces on the hull or flow around the hull occurs in. the region of zero draft. The centers of pressure are generally far aft. At the most efficient trim (1.2'), considerable bow-up moment would be required for practicable operation. There is no abrupt transition from the air-borne to the water- borne condition. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64781/
Tank Tests of an Alternate Hull Form for the Consolidated Vultee PB2Y-3 Airplane
Tests have been made in Langley tank no. I of a dynamic model of the Consolidated Vultee PB2Y-3 airplane. These tests were made using an alternate hull form, the purpose of which was to reduce the bow spray and eliminate the landing instability which are objectionable features of the production design. The major differences from the PB2Y-3 hull included a deeper step to improve the landing stability , and a lengthened forebody and increased beam to reduce the sway in the propellers and on the flaps. The tests showed that the spray characteristics of the revised hull form were much better than that ot the production design. In addition the take-off and landing stability of the model with the alternate hull were satisfactory. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64546/
Tank tests of auxiliary vanes as a substitute for planing area
The results of towing tests made on two models at the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, are presented. The first model represents the hull of the U.S. Navy PN-8 flying boat, in which the sponsors of the original hull are removed and auxiliary lifting vanes are fitted at the chines immediately forward of the main step. The tests showed that the altered form gave a large increase in hump resistance and a very undesirable spray formation through a large part of the speed range. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54462/
Tank tests of flat and v-bottom planning surfaces
Four planing surfaces, all having beams of 16 inches and lengths of 60 inches but varying in dead rise by 10 degrees increments from 0 degrees to 30 degrees, were tested in the N.A.C.A. tank. The results cover a wide range of speed, loads, and trim angles, and are applicable to a variety of problems encountered in the design of seaplanes. The data are analyzed to determine the characteristics of each surface at the trim angle giving minimum resistance for all the speed and loads tested. A planing coefficient intended to facilitate the application of the results to design work is developed and curves of resistance, wetted length, and center of pressure are plotted against this coefficient. Several examples, showing the application of the test data to specific design problems are included. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54174/
Tank tests of model 11-G flying-boat hull
The NACA model 11-G flying-boat hull, a modification of NACA model 11-A was tested over a range of loadings. The planing bottom of model 11-G has a variable-radius flare, or concavity, at the chines in contrast to the straight V planing bottom of model 11-A. The results are given as curves of resistance and trimming moment plotted against speed for various angles of trim. The characteristics of the form at the optimum angles of trim are given in non-dimensional form as curves of resistance coefficient, best trim angle, and trimming-moment coefficient plotted against speed coefficient. As compared with the original form, model 11-G is shown to have higher resistance at all loads and speeds and higher maximum trimming moments at heavy loads. The spray pattern, however, is generally more favorable, indicating that the service performance of model 11-A would be improved by some form of chime flare. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54167/
Tank tests of Model 36 flying boat hull
N.A.C.A. Model 36, a hull form with parallel middle body for half the length of the forebody and designed particularly for use with stub wings, was tested according to the general fixed-trim method over the range of practical loads, trims, and speeds. It was also tested free to trim with the center of gravity at two different positions. The results are given in the form of nondimensional coefficients. The resistance at the hump was exceptionally low but, at high planing speeds, afterbody interference made the performance only mediocre. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54502/
Tank tests of models of floats for single-float seaplanes First series.
Large models of the Mark V and Mark VI floats used for single float seaplanes (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) models 41-A and 41-B, respectively) were tested in the NACA tank to provide general test data for typical single floats and a basis for possible improvements of their form. The resistance of model 41-B was greater than that of model 41-A, either when free to trim or at the best trim angle for each. The resistance of model 35-B (a pointed step hull tested free to trim) was less than either of the models at the hump speed, greater at intermediate planing speeds, and less at the speeds and loads near get-away, although the spray was generally worse owing to the absence of transverse flare. The results of the fixed-trim tests of model 41-A were cross plotted to obtain data at the angle for zero trimming moment and at the best trim angle. The trims assumed by models 41-A and 41-B, when tested free to trim, were found to be excessive at the hump speed. The corresponding trim of model 35-B was found to be approximately 3 degrees lower because of the lower angle of afterbody keel used in this model, and the maximum hump resistance was 15 percent lower. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54163/
Tank tests of models of flying boat hulls having longitudinal steps
Four models with longitudinal steps on the forebody were developed by modification of a model of a conventional hull and were tested in the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) tank. Models with longitudinal steps were found to have smaller resistance at high speed and greater resistance at low speed than the parent model that had the same afterbody but a conventional V-section forebody. The models with a single longitudinal step had better performance at hump speed and as low high-speed resistance except at very light loads. Spray strips at angles from 0 degrees to 45 degrees to the horizontal were fitted at the longitudinal steps and at the chine on one of the two step models having two longitudinal steps. The resistance and the height of the spray were less with each of the spray strips than without; the most favorable angle was found to lie between 15 degrees and 30 degrees. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54213/
Tank tests of NACA model 40 series of hulls for small flying boats and amphibians
The NACA model 40 series of flying-boat hull models consists of 2 forebodies and 3 afterbodies combined to provide several forms suitable for use in small marine aircraft. One forebody is the usual form with hollow bow sections and the other has a bottom surface that is completely developable from bow to step. The afterbodies include a short pointed afterbody with an extension for the tail surfaces, a long afterbody similar to that of a seaplane float but long enough to carry the tail surfaces, and a third obtained by fitting a second step in the latter afterbody. The various combinations were tested in the NACA Tank by the general method over a suitable range of loadings. Fixed-trim tests were made for all speeds likely to be used and free-to-trim tests were made at low speeds to slightly beyond the hump speed. The characteristics of the hulls at best trim angles have been deduced from the data of the tests at fixed trim angles and are given in the form of nondimensional coefficients applicable to any size hull. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66201/
Tank Tests of the Effect of Rivet Heads, etc., on the Water Performance of a Seaplane Float, Special Report
A 1/3.5 full-size model of the Mark V float of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, was tested in the NACA tank both with smooth painted bottom surfaces and with roundhead rivets, plate laps, and keel plates fitted to simulate the actual bottom of a metal float. The augmentation in water resistance due to the added roughness was found to be from 10-12% at the hum speed and from 12-14% at high speeds. The effect of the roughness of the afterbody was found to be negligible except at high trims. The model data were extrapolated to full size by the usual method which assumes the forces to vary according to Froude's law, and in the case of the smooth model by a method of separation that takes into account the effect of scale on the frictional resistance. It was concluded that the effect of rivet heads on the takeoff performance of a relatively high-powered float seaplane is of little consequence but that it may be of greater importance in the case of more moderately powered flying boats. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65053/
Tank tests of three models of flying-boat hulls of the pointed-step type with different angles of dead rise - NACA model 35 series
The results of tank tests of three models of flying-boat hulls of the pointed-step type with different angles of dead rise are given in charts and are compared with results from tests of more conventional hulls. Increasing the angle of dead rise from 15 to 25 degrees: had little effect on the hump resistance; increased the resistance throughout the planning range; increased the best trim angle; reduced the maximum positive trimming moment required to obtain best trim angle; and had but a slight effect on the spray characteristics. For approximately the same angles of dead rise the resistance of the pointed-step hulls were considerably lower at high speeds than those of the more conventional hulls. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54256/
Tank tests of three types of afterbodies on a flying-boat model with basic hull length-beam ratio of 10.0
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55301/
Tank tests of twin seaplane floats
The following report contains the most essential data for the hydrodynamic portion of the twin-float problem. The following points were successfully investigated: 1) difference between stationary and nonstationary flow; 2) effect of the shape of the step; 3) effect of distance between floats; 4) effect of nose-heavy and tail-heavy moments; 5) effect of the shape of floats; 6) maneuverability. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65326/
Tank tests of two floats for high-speed seaplanes
At the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, a study of the design of floats especially suitable for use on high-speed seaplanes was undertaken in the N.A.C.A. tank. This note give the results obtained in tests of one-quarter full-size models of two floats for high-speed seaplanes. One was a float similar to that used on the Macchi high-speed seaplane which competed in the 1926 Schneider Trophy races, and the other a float designed at the N.A.C.A. tank in an attempt to improve on the water performance of the Macchi float. The model of the latter showed considerably better water performance than the model of the Macchi float. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54173/
Tank tests of two models of flying-boat hulls to determine the effect of ventilating the step
The results of tests made in the N.A.C.A. tank on two models of flying-boat hulls to determine the effect of ventilating the step are given graphically. The step of N.A.C.A. model 11-C was ventilated in several different ways and it was found that the resistance of the normal form is not appreciably affected by artificial ventilation in any of the forms tried. Further tests made with the depth of the step of model 11-C reduced likewise show no appreciable effect on the resistance from ventilation of the step. Tests were made on a model of the hull of the Navy P3M-1 flying-boat hull both with and without ventilation of the step. It was found that the discontinuity which is obtained in the resistance curves of this model is eliminated by ventilating the step. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54380/
Tank tests on the resistance and porpoising characteristics of three flying-boat hull models equipped with planing flaps
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61790/
Tank tests to determine the effect of varying design parameters of planing-tail hulls I : effect of varying length, width, and plan-form taper of afterbody
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54910/
Tank tests to determine the effect of varying design parameters of planing-tail hulls II : effect of varying depth of step, angle of after- body keel, length of afterbody chine, and gross load
The second part of a series of tests made in Langley tank no. 2 to determine the effect of varying design parameters of planing-tail hulls is presented. Results are given to show the effects on resistance characteristics of varying angle of afterbody keel, depth of step, and length of afterbody chine. The effect of varying the gross load is shown for one configuration. The resistance characteristics of planing-tail hulls are compared with those of a conventional flying-boat hull. The forces on the forebody and afterbody of one configuration are compared with the forces on a conventional hull. Increasing the angle of afterbody keel had small effect on hump resistance and no effect on high-speed resistance but increased free-to-trim resistance at intermediate speeds. Increasing the depth of step increased hump resistance, had little effect on high-speed resistance, and increased free-to-trim resistance at intermediate speeds. Omitting the chines on the forward 25 percent of the afterbody had no appreciable effect on resistance. Omitting 70 percent of the chine length had almost no effect on maximum resistance but broadened the hump and increased spray around the afterbody. Load-resistance ratio at the hump decreased more rapidly with increasing load coefficient for the planing-tail hull than for the representative conventional hull, although the load-resistance ratio at the hump was greater for the planing-tail hull than for the conventional hull throughout the range of loads tested. At speeds higher than hump speed, load-resistance ratio for the planing-tail hull was a maximum at a particular gross load and was slightly less at heavier and lighter gross loads. The planing-tail hull was found to have lower resistance than the conventional hull at both the hump and at high speeds, but at intermediate speeds there was little difference. The lower hump resistance of the planing-tail hull was attributed to the ability of the afterbody to carry a greater percentage of the total load while maintaining a higher value of load-resistance ratio. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53675/
Tank tests to determine the effect on planing-tail hulls of varying length, width, and plan-form taper of afterbody
Tests were conducted in Langley Tank no. 2 on models of an unconventional flying-boat hull called a planing-tail hull to determine the effects on resistance of varying a number of afterbody parameters. The effects of varying length, width, and plan-form taper of the afterbody are presented. Tests were made with afterbodies of two widths, two lengths, and two tapers. In the tests the depth of step and the angle of afterbody keel were held constant.(author). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65684/
Tank tests to determine the effects of the chine flare of a flying-boat hull N.A.C.A. Model Series 62 and 69
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54597/
Tank Tests to Show the Effect Rivet Heads on the Water Performance of a Seaplane-Float
A 1/3.5 full-sized model of a seaplane float constructed from lines supplied by the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, was tested first with smooth painted bottom surfaces and then with round-head rivets, plate laps, and keel plates fitted to simulate the actual bottom of a metal float. A percentage increase in water resistance caused by the added roughness was found to be from 5 to 20 percent at the hump speed and from 15 to 40 percent at high speeds. The effect of the roughness of the afterbody was found to be negligible except at high trims. The model data were extrapolated to full size by the usual method that assumes the forces to vary according to Froude's law and, in the case of the smooth model, by a method of separation that takes into account the effect of scale on the frictional resistance. It was concluded that the effect of rivet heads on the take-off performance of a relatively high-powered float seaplane is of little consequence, but it may be of greater importance in the case of more moderately powered flying boats. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54419/
Tanks test of a model of the hull of the Navy PB-1 flying boat - N.A.C.A. Model 52
A model of the hull of the Navy PB-1 flying boat was tested in the N.A.C.A. tank as part of a program intended to provide information regarding the water performance of hulls of flying boats of earlier design for which hydrodynamic data have heretofore been unavailable. Tests were made according to the general method over the range of practical loadings with the model both fixed in trim and free to trim. A free-to-trim test according to the specific method was also made for the design load and take-off speed corresponding to those of the full-scale flying boat. The resistance obtained from the fixed-trim test was found to be about the same as that of the model of the NC flying-boat hull, and greater at the hump but smaller at high speeds than that of a model of the Sikorsky S-40 flying-boat hull. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc54221/
Tapered wings, tip stalling, and preliminary results from tests of the stall-control flap
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61414/
Tarpon Springs: Biological Resources
Map showing biological resources (birds, habitats, reefs, fishes, etc.) in the Tarpon Springs region of the Florida coastline. Scale 1:100,000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66766/
Tarpon Springs: Biological Resources
Map showing biological resources (birds, habitats, reefs, fishes, etc.) in the Tarpon Springs region of the Florida coastline. Scale 1:100,000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66799/
Tarpon Springs, Florida
Map showing biological resources (aquatic organisms, terrestrial organisms, land use, etc.) in the Tarpon Springs region of the Gulf of Mexico coast area. Scale 1:250,000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66691/
Tarpon Springs: Hydrology and Climatology
Map showing various hydrologic and climatologic aspects (rainfall, measurement stations, hurricane inundation zones, etc.) in the Tarpon Springs region of the Florida coastline. Scale 1:100,000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66542/
Tarpon Springs: Hydrology and Climatology
Map showing various hydrologic and climatologic aspects (rainfall, measurement stations, hurricane inundation zones, etc.) in the Tarpon Springs region of the Florida coastline. Scale 1:100,000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66871/
Tarpon Springs: Oil, Gas and Mineral Resources
Map showing mineral resources (oil, gas, sand, clay, etc.) in the Tarpon Springs region of the Florida coastline. Scale 1:100,000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66718/
Tarpon Springs: Oil, Gas and Mineral Resources
Map showing mineral resources (oil, gas, sand, clay, etc.) in the Tarpon Springs region of the Florida coastline. Scale 1:100,000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66853/
Tarpon Springs: Socioeconomic Features
Map showing various sites and features (recreation sites, land use, landfills, historic sites, transportation, etc.) in the Tarpon Springs region of the Florida coastline. Scale 1:100,000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66750/
Tarpon Springs: Socioeconomic Features
Map showing various sites and features (recreation sites, land use, landfills, historic sites, transportation, etc.) in the Tarpon Springs region of the Florida coastline. Scale 1:100,000. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66817/