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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Smoking characteristics of various fuels as determined by open-cup and laboratory-burner smoke tests
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62548/
Smooth-Water Landing Stability and Rough-Water Landing and Take-Off Behavior of a 1/13-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee Skate 7 Seaplane, TED No. NACA DE 338
A model of the Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation Skate 7 seaplane was tested in Langley tank no. 2. Presented without discussion in this paper are landing stability in smooth water, maximum normal accelerations occurring during rough-water landings, and take-off behavior in waves. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64762/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.1
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100366/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.2
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100367/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.3 Chromel-Alumel Thermocouples
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100368/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.4
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100369/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.5
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100370/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.6
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100371/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.7
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100372/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.8
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100373/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.9
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100374/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.10
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100375/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.11
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100376/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.12 Alumel-Chromel Cryogenic Thermocouple
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100377/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.13
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100378/
Smoothed Thermocouple Tables of Extended Significance (°C), Volume 2: Section 2.14
This report is a segment providing smoothed thermocouple tables of extended significance in degrees Celsius (°C) for [section name]. It includes [1] a figure illustrating the difference in microvolts between the values in the smoothed table and those in the reference table and [2] a reference table containing (i) a tabulation of smoothed emf (in absolute millivolts) vs. temperature for a specific thermocouple and (ii) a tabulation of emf differences. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100379/
Snap-8 Corrosion Program Quarterly Progress Report for Period Ending November 30, 1964
Report issued by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discussing quarterly progress made by the Snap-8 Corrosion Program. Progress in design, operation, and experimental work is presented. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100310/
SNAPTRAN 2/10A-3 destructive test results
Report regarding a rapid water immersion test on a SNAP 10A/2 reactor core. It includes the radiological results of the tests and the reactor behavior that influenced these results. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100243/
The soap-bubble method of studying the combustion of mixtures of carbon monoxide and oxygen
This investigation is a detailed description of the soap-bubble, or constant-pressure, method as applied to the explosive oxidation of carbon monoxide. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc66188/
Soaring flight and the Rhon contests
Explanation of soaring flight. Static and dynamic soaring flight. Results of the Rhon contest. Description of the most important gliders. Notes on Soaring Flight Contests in France and England. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56194/
Soaring flight in Guinea
The term soaring is applied here to the flight of certain large birds which maneuver in the air without moving their wings. The author explains the methods of his research and here gives approximate figures for the soaring flight of the Egyptian Vulture and the African White backed Vulture. Figures are given in tabular form for relative air speed per foot per second, air velocity per foot per second, lift/drag ratio, and selected coefficients. The author argues that although the figures given were taken from a very limited series of observations, they have nevertheless thrown some light on the use by birds of the internal energy of the air. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53687/
Soaring without rising currents
Methods for soaring with fluctuating wind speeds are examined. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56198/
Sodium Components Test Facility
Development of more reliable, lower cost components for high temperature liquid metal-cooled reactor plants. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc101022/
Sodium-Cooled Reactors Program, Fast Ceramic Reactor Development Program: Summary Report, July 1959 - September 1961
Summary report discussing progress on the Fast Ceramic Reactor Development Program, a project to develop fast reactors employing ceramic fuels, especially mixed plutonium-uranium oxide. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc101065/
Sodium Heat Engine Development Program
The Sodium Heat Engine (SHE) is an efficient thermoelectric conversion device which directly generates electricity from a thermally regenerative electrochemical cell that relies on the unique conduction properties of {beta}{double prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). Laboratory models of a variety of SHE devices have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the system, engineering development of large prototype devices has been slowed by a series of materials and fabrication problems. Failure of the electrolyte tubes has been a recurring problem and a number of possible causes have been postulated. To address these issues, a two-phase engineering development program was undertaken. This report summarizes the final results of the first phase of the program, which included extensive materials characterization activities, a study of applicable nondestructive evaluation methods, an investigation of possible stress states that would contribute to fracture, and certain operational issues associated with the electromagnetic pumps used in the SHE prototype. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283065/
Sodium Hydride Precipitation in Sodium Cold Traps
A series of experiments have been performed to test a calculational model for precipitation of NaH in sodium cold traps. The calculational model, called ACTMODEL, is a computer simulation that uses the system geometry and operating conditions as input to calculate a mass-transfer coefficient and the distribution of NaH in a cold trap. The ACTMODEL was tested using an analytical cold trap (ACT) that is simple and essentially one-dimensional. The ACT flow and temperature profile can be controlled at any desired condition. The ACT was analyzed destructively after each test to measure the actual NaH distribution. Excellent agreement was obtained between the ACTMODEL simulations and the experiments. Mass-transfer coefficients ranging upward from 6 x 10/sup -5/ m/s were measured in both packless and packed traps. As much as a fourfold increase in precipitation surface area was observed with increasing amount of NaH deposited. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283418/
The Sodium Hydroxide Reactor : Effect of Reactor Variables on Criticality and Fuel-Element Temperature Requirements for Subsonic and Supersonic Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59455/
The Sodium Hydroxide Reactor - Effect of Reactor Variables on Criticality and Fuel- Element Temperature Requirements for Subsonic and Supersonic Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion
No abstract available. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53169/
Sodium Mass Transfer - I: Test Loop Design
From abstract: "This report presents the design, fabrication, assembly, operating procedures, and start-up data for six experimental test loops to examine the effect of steel exposed to sodium at temperatures as high as 1300 F." digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc101061/
Sodium Waste Technology : a Summary Report
The Sodium Waste Technology (SWT) Program was established to resolve long-standing issues regarding disposal of sodium-bearing waste and equipment. Comprehensive SWT research programs investigated a variety of approaches for either removing sodium from sodium-bearing items, or disposal of items containing sodium residuals. The most successful of these programs was the design, test, and the production operation of the Sodium Process Demonstration Facility at ANL-W. The technology used was a series of melt-drain-evaporate operations to remove nonradioactive sodium from sodium-bearing items and then converting the sodium to storable compounds. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc282805/
Software for Estimating Sparse Jacobian Matrices
In many nonlinear problems it is necessary to estimate the Jacobian matrix of a nonlinear mapping F. In large scale problems the Jacobian of F is usually sparse, and then estimation by differences is attractive because the number of differences can be small compared to the dimension of the problem. For example, if the Jacobian matrix is banded then the number of differences needed to estimate the Jacobian matrix is, at most, the width of the band. In this paper we describe a set of subroutines whose purpose is to estimate the Jacobian matrix of a mapping F with the least possible number of function evaluations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283540/
Soil Mechanics Design: Stability of Slopes and Foundations
Report providing comprehensive descriptions of design methods for analyzing the stability of slopes and foundations. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc303908/
A Solar District-Heating System Using Seasonal Storage for the Charlestown, Boston Navy Yard Redevelopment Project
A preliminary analysis is presented for a seasonal storage solar heating system for the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston, Massachusetts. The area occupies a prominent location in the Boston Harbor and is being redeveloped for residential and commercial use. The system makes use of two large, buried concrete storage tanks totaling 5700 cubic meters as a water heat store. Other storage facilities, including a dry dock, offer additional solar opportunities for the navy Yard as the redevelopment progresses. The analysis makes extensive use of MINSUN, a computer performance and economic simulation routine written specifically for solar seasonal storage systems. The system performance and economics are analyzed for different collector types and areas, component costs, exogenous economic conditions, and optional inclusion of a heat pump. System cost-effectiveness is defined in relation to an economic break-even situation with respect to a conventional system, and is presented in terms of a solar premium, which is the incremental cost for the solar system per MWH of conventional fuel displaced. The additional analysis and design considerations necessary before an implementation phase are outlined. System implementation is discussed in terms of the roles of the various parties involved and funding/financing possibilities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283569/
Solar Energy Program Annual Report:1978
Annual report of the Solar Energy Program describing work in solar energy collection, heating and cooling, thermal energy storage, ocean thermal energy conversion, photovoltaics, satellite power systems, bioconversion, central receiver solar thermal power, and wind energy conversion. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283203/
The Solar Spectrum 2935 Å to 8770 Å : Second Revision of Rowland's Preliminary Table of Solar Spectrum Wavelengths
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc13249/
Solid State Division Annual Progress Report for Period Ending August 31, 1957
Report issued by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discussing annual progress made by the Solid State Division. Work and research progress made during 1957 is presented. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100307/
Solid State Division Annual Progress Report, May 31, 1964
Report containing ongoing research and development of the Solid State Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100345/
Solid State Division Semiannual Progress Report, August 30, 1955
Report containing papers, publications, and announcements from the Solid State Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100483/
Solid State Division Semiannual Progress Report, February 29, 1956
Report documenting the ongoing research and developments of the Solid State Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Contains related papers and other publications. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100484/
Solid State Division Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending August 30, 1956
Report issued by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discussing semiannual progress made by the Solid State Division during 1956. Descriptions of progress and studies made are presented. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100308/
Solidification and Separation of Ice From Saline Water
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11646/
Solidification Modeling of a Spiral Casting to Determine Material Fluidity
In casting, fluidity is the measure of the distance a metal can flow in a channel before being stopped by solidification. During mold filling, the metal loses heat to the surrounding mold, thereby cooling and becoming more viscous until the leading portion solidifies and no further flow is possible. A coupled heat-transfer and fluid-flow modeling of a spiral, involving the use of thermophysical properties to determine material fluidity, has been conducted. Simulations of these experiments utilized the Casting Process Simulator (CaPS) software developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Two types of spiral geometries with different assumptions were considered: (1) a two-dimensional laterally stretched spiral and (2) a three-dimensional lateral spiral. The computer extent of mold filling is in good agreement with the experimental results. Time required by the metal/gas interface to attain specific positions in the spiral arm also compares favorably with the experimental results. The influence of process variables, especially pour time, is discussed. The CaPS software has been used as a computational tool to investigate the validity of the dimensionality assumptions and to evaluate the ability of CaPS to model fluidity adequately. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283160/
Solidification of High-Level Radioactive Fuel Reprocessing Wastes by Spray and Pot Calcination: Hot-Cell Pilot Plant Studies
Report regarding the calcination of full level Purex and Redox waste carried out "in a remotely operated pilot plant consisting of a radiant-heat spray calciner and a pot calciner and their associated off-gas equipment" (p. 4). This contains details of the calcination, effects on the waste, and difficulties encountered. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100656/
Solubility of water in hydrocarbons
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59325/
A Solution of the Direct and Inverse Potential Problems for Arbitrary Cascades of Airfoils
Methods are given of determining the potential flow plast an arbitrary cascade of airfoils and the inverse problem of determining an airfoil having a prescribed velocity distribution in cascade. Results indicated that Cartesian mapping function method may be satisfactorily extended to include cascades. Numerical calculation for computing cascades by Cartesian mapping function method is considerably greater than for single airfoils but much less than hitherto required for cascades. Detailed results are presented graphically. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61263/
Solution of the General Nonlinear Programming Problem with Subroutine VMCOM
The solution of the general nonlinear programming problem by means of a subroutine called VMCON is described. VMCON uses an algorithm that solves a sequence of positive-definite quadratic programming sub-problems. Each solution determines a direction in which a one-dimensional minimization is performed. In developing this code, changes in the original implementation were made to make the program easier to use and maintain and to incorporate some recently developed LINPACK subprograms. The current implementation contains extensive in-line documentation; an interface subroutine, VMCON1, with a simplified calling sequence; and print options to aid the user in interpreting results. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283462/
The solution of the laminar-boundary-layer equation for the flat plate for velocity and temperature fields for variable physical properties and for the diffusion field at high concentration
In connection with Pohlhausen's solution for the temperature field on the flat plate, a series of formulas were indicated by means of which the velocity and temperature field for variable physical characteristics can be computed by an integral equation and an iteration method based on it. With it, the following cases were solved: On the assumption that the viscosity simply varies with the temperature while the other fluid properties remain constant, the velocity and temperature field on the heated and cooled plate, respectively, was computed at the Prandtl numbers 12.5 and 100 (viscous fluids). A closer study of these two cases resulted in general relations: The calculations for a gas of Pr number 0.7 (air) were conducted on the assumption that all fluid properties vary with the temperature, and the velocities are low enough for the heat of friction to be discounted. The result was a thickening of the boundary layers, but no appreciable modification in shearing stress or heat-transfer coefficient. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63026/
A solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for source and sink flows of a viscous heat-conducting compressible fluid
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56346/
Solutions of laminar-boundary-equations which result in specific-weight-flow profiles locally exceeding free-stream values
Revised solutions of the laminar-boundary-layer equations for cases which involved cooling at the wall combined with large pressure gradients in the main stream produced specific-weight-flow profiles which locally exceeded free-stream values. Heat-transfer and friction coefficients, boundary-layer thicknesses, and velocity, temperature, and specific-weight-flow distributions resulting from the revised solutions are presented for Euler numbers of 0.5 and 1, stream-to-wall temperature ratios of 2 and 4, and cooling-air flow rates through porous walls designated by flow parameters of 0, -0.5, and -1. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56390/
Solvent Extraction of Strontium, Cerium, and are Earths with D2EHPA, Part 2: Pilot Plant Studies
Report that "presents the results of pilot plant studies on the application of the D2EHPA (di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid) solvent system to the needs of the Hanford Waste Management Program" (p. 1). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc100640/