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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Aerodynamic characteristics and flying qualities of a tailless triangular-wing airplane configuration as obtained from flights of rocket-propelled models at transonic and supersonic speeds
A flight investigation of rocket-powered models of a tailless triangular-wing airplane configuration was made through the transonic and low supersonic speed range at the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Station at Wallops Island, Va. An analysis of the aerodynamic coefficients, stability derivatives, and flying qualities based on the results obtained from the successful flight tests of three models is presented. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc56243/
Aerodynamic characteristics and pressure distributions of a 6-percent-thick 49 degree sweptback wing with blowing over half-span and full-span flaps
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61390/
Aerodynamic characteristics at a Mach number of 1.25 of a 6-percent-thick triangular wing and 6- and 9-percent-thick triangular wings in combination with a fuselage : wing aspect ratio 2.31, biconvex airfoil sections
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58471/
Aerodynamic characteristics at a Mach number of 1.38 of four wings of aspect ratio 4 having quarter-chord sweep angles of 0 degrees, 35 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58552/
Aerodynamic Characteristics at a Mach Number of 6.8 of Two Hypersonic Missile Configurations, One with Low-Aspect-Ratio Cruciform Fins and Trailing-Edge Flaps and One with a Flared Afterbody and All-Movable Controls
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53265/
Aerodynamic characteristics at a Mach number of 6.8 of two hypersonic missile configurations, one with low-aspect-ratio cruciform fins and trailing-edge flaps and one with a flared afterbody and all-movable controls
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64170/
Aerodynamic characteristics at high and low subsonic Mach numbers of four NACA 6-series airfoil sections at angles of attack from -2 to 31 degrees
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59710/
Aerodynamic Characteristics at High and Low Subsonic Mach Numbers of the NACA 0012, 64(sub 2)-015, and 64(sub 3)-018 Airfoil Sections at Angles of Attack from -2 Degrees to 30 Degrees
An investigation has been made in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel of the aerodynamic characteristics of the NACA 0012, 64(sub 2)-015, and 64(sub 3)-018 airfoil sections. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.3 to that for tunnel choke, at angles of attack from -2deg to 30deg, and with the surface. of each airfoil smooth-and with roughness applied at the leading edge.The Reynolds numbers of the tests ranged from 0.8 x 10(exp 6) to 4.4 x 10(exp 6). The results are presented as variations of lift, drag, and quarter-chord pitching-moment coefficients with Mach number. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64237/
Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller and of a two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-045 propeller
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57659/
Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of full-scale propellers having Clark Y blade sections
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64614/
Aerodynamic Characteristics at High Speeds of Full-Scale Propellers having Different Shank Designs
Tests of two 10-foot-diameter two-blade propellers which differed only in shank design have been made in the Langley 16-foot high-speed tunnel. The propellers are designated by their blade design numbers, NACA 10-(5)(08)-03, which had aerodynamically efficient airfoil shank sections, and NACA l0-(5)(08)-03R which had thick cylindrical shank sections typical of conventiona1 blades, The propellers mere tested on a 2000-horsepower dynamometer through a range of blade-angles from 20deg to 55deg at various rotational speeds and at airspeeds up to 496 miles per hour. The resultant tip speeds obtained simulate actual flight conditions, and the variation of air-stream Mach number with advance ratio is within the range of full-scale constant-speed propeller operation. Both propellers were very efficient, the maximum envelope efficiency being approximately 0,95 for the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03 propeller and about 5 percent less for the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03R propeller. Based on constant power and rotational speed, the efficiency of the NACA 10-(05)(08)-03 propeller was from 2.8 to 12 percent higher than that of the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03R propeller over a range of airspeeds from 225 to 450 miles per hour. The loss in maximum efficiency at the design blade angle for the NACA 10-(5)(08)-03 and 10-(5)(08)-03R propellers vas about 22 and 25 percent, respectively, for an increase in helical tip Mach number from 0.70 to 1.14. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64248/
Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of related full-scale propellers having different blade-section cambers
Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale two-blade NACA 10-(10)(08)-03 (high camber) propeller have been made for a range of blade angles from 20 degrees to 55 degrees at airspeeds up to 500 miles per hour. The results of these tests have been compared with results from previous tests of the NACA 10-(3) (08)-03 (low camber) and NACA 10-(5)(08)-03 (medium camber) propellers to evaluate the effects of blade-section camber on propeller aerodynamic characteristics. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60706/
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach number 4.04 of a rectangular wing of aspect ratio 1.33 having a 6-percent-thick circular-arc profile and a 30-percent-chord full-span trailing-edge flap
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59736/
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach number of 2.01 of two cruciform missile configurations having 70 degree delta wings with length-diameter ratios of 14.8 and 17.7 with several canard controls
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60740/
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach number of 4.06 of a typical supersonic airplane model using body and vertical-tail wedges to improve directional stability
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63668/
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers 2.36 and 2.87 of an airplane configuration having a cambered arrow wing with a 75 degree swept leading edge
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64269/
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 0.7 to 1.75 of a four-engine swept-wing airplane configuration as obtained from a rocket-propelled model test
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62214/
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 2.5 to 3.5 of a canard bomber configuration designed for supersonic cruise flight
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64406/
Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers of 1.61 and 2.01 of various tip controls on the wing panel of a 0.05-scale model of a Martin XASM-N-7 (Bullpup) missile : TED No. NACA AD 3106
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62380/
Aerodynamic characteristics at Reynolds numbers of 3.0 x 10(exp 6) and 6.0 x 10(exp 6) of three airfoil sections formed by cutting off various amounts from the rear portion of the NACA 0012 airfoil section
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55451/
Aerodynamic characteristics at subcritical and supercritical Mach numbers of two airfoil sections having sharp leading edges and extreme rearward positions of maximum thickness
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58030/
Aerodynamic characteristics at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers of a thin triangular wing of aspect ratio 2 I : maximum thickness at 20 percent of the chord
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57967/
Aerodynamic characteristics at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers of a thin triangular wing of aspect ratio 2 II : maximum thickness at midchord
The lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics of a triangular wing, having an aspect ratio of 2 and a symmetrical double-wedge profile of 5-percent-chord maximum thickness at midchord, have been evaluated from wind-tunnel tests at Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.975 and from 1.09 to 1.49 and at Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.67 to 0.85 million. The lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients of the triangular wing with a leading-edge sweepback of approximately 63 degrees did not exhibit the irregular variations with Mach number at high subsonic and low supersonic Mach numbers that are characteristic of unswept wings. The lift-curve slope increased steadily with Mach number below unity and declined slowly beyond the Mach number of 1.13. A substantial rise in the minimum drag coefficient occurred between Mach numbers of 0.95 and 1.20 with an associated reduction in the maximum lift-drag ratio. The aerodynamic center shifted rearward toward the centroid of area of the wing with increasing Mach number below 0.975; whereas above 1.09 it coincided with the centroid. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64583/
Aerodynamic characteristics at subsonic and transonic speeds of a 42.7 degree sweptback wing model having an aileron with finite trailing-edge thickness
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc57819/
Aerodynamic characteristics at supersonic speeds of a series of wing-body combinations having cambered wings with an aspect ratio of 3.5 and a taper ratio of 0.2 : effect at M = 2.01 of nacelle shape and position on the aerodynamic characteristics in
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64976/
Aerodynamic characteristics at supersonic speeds of a series of wing-body combinations having cambered wings with an aspect ratio of 3.5 and a taper ratio of 0.2 : effects of sweep angle and thickness ratio on the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59859/
Aerodynamic characteristics at supersonic speeds of a series of wing-body combinations having cambered wings with an aspect ratio of 3.5 and a taper ratio of 0.2 : effects of sweep angle and thickness ratio on the static lateral stability characteris
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59769/
Aerodynamic characteristics at transonic and supersonic speeds of a rocket-propelled airplane configuration having a 52.5 degree delta wing and a low, swept horizontal tail
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60270/
Aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of a 60 degree delta wing equipped with a constant-chord flap-type control with and without an unshielded horn balance : transonic-bump method
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59035/
Aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of a 69 degree delta wing with a triangular plan-form control having a skewed hinge axis and an overhang balance : transonic-bump method
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58716/
The aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of a model with a 45 degree sweptback wing, including the effect of leading edge slats and a low horizontal tail
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59937/
Aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of a tapered 45 degree sweptback wing of aspect ratio 3 having a full-span flap type of control with overhang balance : transonic-bump method
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59858/
Aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of a wing having a 45 degree sweep, aspect ratio 8, taper ratio 0.45, and airfoil sections varying from the NACA 63A010 section at the root to the NACA 63A006 section at the tip.
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59094/
The aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of an all-movable, tapered, 45 degree sweptback, aspect-ratio-4 tail deflected about a skewed hinge axis and equipped with an inset unbalancing tab
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59768/
The aerodynamic characteristics at transonic speeds of an all-movable, tapered, 45 degrees sweptback, aspect-ratio-4 tail surface deflected about a skewed hinge axis
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59136/
Aerodynamic characteristics extended to high angles of attack at transonic speeds of a small-scale 0 degree sweep wing, 45 degree sweptback wing, and 60 degree delta wing
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59419/
Aerodynamic characteristics for internal-balance and Frise type ailerons on an NACA 6 series low-drag tip section of the wing for the XP-63 airplane
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61354/
Aerodynamic Characteristics in Pitch and Sideslip at High Subsonic Speeds of a 1/14-Scale Model of the Grumman XF104 Airplane with Wing Sweepback of 42.5 Degrees
An investigation has been made at high subsonic speeds of the aerodynamic'characteristics in pitch and sideslip of a l/l4-scale model of the Grumman XF10F airplane with a wing sweepback angle of 42.5. The longitudinal stability characteristics (with the horizontal tail fixed) indicate a pitch-up near the stall; however, this was somewhat alleviated by the addition of fins to the side of the fuselage below the horizontal tail. The original model configuration became directionally unstable for small sideslip angles at Mach numbers above 0.8; however, the instability was eliminated by several different modifications. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65277/
The Aerodynamic Characteristics in Pitch of a 1/15-Scale Model of the Grumman F11F-1 Airplane at Mach Numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01, TED No. NACA DE 390
Tests have been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01 to determine the static longitudinal stability and control characteristics of various arrangements of the Grumman F11F-1 airplane. Tests were made of the complete model and various combinations of its component parts and, in addition, the effects of various body modifications, a revised vertical tail, and wing fences on the longitudinal characteristics were determined. The results indicate that for a horizontal-tail incidence of -10 deg the trim lift coefficient varied from 0.29 at a Mach number of 1.61 to 0.23 at a Mach number of 2.01 with a corresponding decrease in lift-drag trim from 3.72 to 3.15. Stick-position instability was indicated in the low-supersonic-speed range. A photographic-type nose modification resulted in slightly higher values of minimum drag coefficient but did not significantly affect the static stability or lift-curve slope. The minimum drag coefficient for the complete model with the production nose remained essentially constant at 0.047 throughout the Mach number range investigated. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64561/
Aerodynamic characteristics in pitch of a series of cruciform-wing missiles with canard controls at a Mach number of 2.01
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc59869/
Aerodynamic characteristics including effects of wing fixes of a 1/20-scale model of the Convair F-102 airplane at transonic speeds
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc60691/
Aerodynamic characteristics including pressure distribution of a fuselage and three combinations of the fuselage with swept-back wings at high subsonic speeds
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58630/
Aerodynamic characteristics including scale effect of several wings and bodies alone and in combination at a Mach number of 1.53
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc58084/
Aerodynamic characteristics of 15 NACA airfoil sections at seven Reynolds numbers from 0.7 x 10(exp 6) to 9.0 x 10(exp 6)
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc55250/
Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 0.5-Scale Model of the Fairchild XSAM-N-2 Lark Missile at High Subsonic Speeds
An investigation was conducted to determine the longitudinal- and lateral-stability characteristics of a 0.5-scale moue1 of the Fairchild Lark missile, The model was tested with 0 deg and with 22.5 deg of roll. Three horizontal wings having NACA 16-009, 16-209, and 64A-209 sections were tested. Pressures were measured on both pointed and blunt noses. The wind-tunnel-test data indicate that rolling the missile 22.5 deg. had no serious effect on the static longitudinal stability. The desired maneuvering acceleration could not be attained with any of the horizontal wings tested, even with the horizontal wing flaps deflected 50 deg. The flaps on the 64A-209 wing (with small trailing-edge angles and flat sides) were effective at all flap deflections, while the flaps on the 16-series wings (with large trailing-edge angles) lost effectiveness at small flap deflections. The data showed that rolling moment existed when the vertical wing flaps were deflected with the model at other than zero angle of attack. A similar rolling moment probably would be found . with the horizontal wing flaps deflected and the model yawed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc65224/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01
Tests have been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01 of various arrangements of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane with faired inlets. Tests made of the model equipped with a plain wing, a wing with 6.4 percent conical camber, and a wing with 15 percent conical camber. Body modifications including an extended nose, a modified canopy, and extended afterbody fillets were evaluated. In addition, the effects of a revised vertical tail and two different ventral fins were determined. The results indicated that the use of cambered wings resulted in lower drag in the lift-coefficient range above 0.2. This range, however, is above that which would generally be required for level flight; hence, the usefulness of camber might be confined to increased maneuverability at the higher lifts while its use may be detrimental to the high-speed (low-lift) capabilities. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc53599/
Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 0.04956-Scale Model of the Convair F-102A Airplane at Transonic Speeds
Tests have been conducted in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel on a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane which employed an indented and extended fuselage, cambered wing leading edges, and deflected wing tips. Force and moment characteristics were obtained for Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.135 at angles of attack up to 20 . In addition, tests were made over a limited angle-of-attack range to determine the effects of the cambered leading edges, deflected tips, and a nose section with a smooth area distribution. Fuselage modifications employed on the F-102A were responsible for a 25.percent reduction in the minimum drag-coefficient rise between the Mach numbers of 0.85 and 1.075 when compared with that for the earlier versions of the F-102. Although the wing modifications increased the F-102A subsonic minimum drag-coefficient level approximately 0.0020, they produced large decreases in drag at lifting conditions over that for the original (plane-wing) F-102. The F-102A had 15 to 25 percent higher maximum lift-drag ratios than did the original F-102. The F-102A had about 15 percent lower maximum lift-drag ratios at Mach numbers below 0.95 and slightly higher maximum lift-drag ratios at supersonic speeds when compared with those ratios for sn earlier modified-wing version of the F-102. Chordwise wing fences which provided suitable longitudinal stability for the original F-102 were not adequate for the cambered-wing F-102A The pitching-moment curves indicated a region of near neutral stability with possible pitch-up tendencies for the F-102A at high subsonic Mach numbers for lift coefficients between about 0.4 and 0.5. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64638/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102B airplane at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01 : COORD No. AF-231
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc62402/
Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 0.04956-Scale Model of the Convair TF-102A Airplane at Transonic Speeds, Coord. No. AF-120
The basic aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair TF-102A airplane with controls undeflected have been determined at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.135 for angles of attack up to approximately 22 deg in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel. In addition, comparisons have been made with data obtained from a previous investigation of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane. The results indicated the TF-102A airplane was longitudinally stable for all conditions tested. An increase in lift-curve slope from 0.045 to 0.059 and an 11-percent rearward shift in aerodynamic-center location occurred with increases in Mach number from 0.60 to approximately 1.05. The zero-lift drag coefficient for the TF-102A airplane increased 145 percent between the Mach numbers of 0.85 and 1.075; the maximum lift-drag ratio decreased from 9.5 at a Mach number of 0.60 to 5.0 at Mach numbers above 1.025. There was little difference in the lift and pitching-moment characteristics and drag due to life between the TF-102A and F-102A configurations. However, as compared with the F-102A airplane, the zero-lift drag-rise Mach number for the TF-102A was reduced by at least 0.06, the zero-lift peak wave drag was increased 50 percent, and the maximum lift-drag ratio was reduced as much as 20 percent. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64563/
Aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/4-scale model of the duct system for the General Electric P-1 nuclear powerplant for aircraft
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc61696/