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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/10-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel, TED No. NACA DE306

Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/10-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel, TED No. NACA DE306

Date: January 1, 1948
Creator: Draper, John W. & Hewes, Donald E.
Description: At the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, a stability and control investigation of a 1/10-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane has been conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. Results of force end flight tests to determine the power-off stability and control characteristics of the model with slats retracted and extended are presented herein. The longitudinal and lateral stability characteristics were satisfactory for both the slats retracted and extended conditions over the lift range up to the stall. With the slats retracted, the stall was fairly gentle but the model rolled off out of control. With the slats extended, control could be maintained at the stall so that the wings could be kept level even as the model dropped.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane

Free-Spinning-Tunnel Tests of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane

Date: January 1, 1948
Creator: Daughtridge, Lee T., Jr.
Description: An investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 0.057-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The effects of control settings and movements on the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics were determined, as were also the effects of extending the wing slats, of center-of-gravity movement, and-of variation in the mass distribution. The investigation also included wing-tip spin-recovery-parachute tests, pilot-escape tests, and rudder-control-force tests. The investigation indicated that the spin and recovery characteristics of the airplane will be satisfactory for all conditions. It was found that a single 4.24-foot (full-scale) parachute when opened alone from the outboard wing tip or two 8.77-foot (full-scale) parachutes when opened simultaneously, one from each wing tip, would effect satisfactory emergency recoveries (the drag coefficients of the parachutes, based on the surface area of the parachute, were 0.83 and 0.70 for the 4.24- and 8.77-foot parachutes, respectively). The towline length in both cases was 25 feet (full scale). Tests results showed that, if the pilot should have to leave the airplane during a spin, he should jump from the outboard side (left side in a right spin) of the cockpit. The rudder-control force ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Spin Tests of 1/20-Scale Models of the Chance Vought Revised XF6U-1 and F6U-1 Airplanes, TED No. NACA 2390

Spin Tests of 1/20-Scale Models of the Chance Vought Revised XF6U-1 and F6U-1 Airplanes, TED No. NACA 2390

Date: June 28, 1948
Creator: Klinar, Walter J. & Berman, Theodore
Description: An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on the 1/20-scale model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane altered to represent the XF6U-1 airplane as it will be spin-tested in flight, and also altered to represent the F6U-1 airplane as it will be produced for service use. Spin tests were made to determine the effects of control settings and movements at the normal loading. The results show that the spins obtained on the revised XF6U-1 airplane will be oscillatory in roll and yaw and that recoveries by rudder reversal will be rapid. Model test results indicate that the F6U-1 airplane will probably not spin. Inasmuch as the results of this investigation show that the new designs are as good as or better than the original XF6U-1 design in regard to spin recovery, it is felt that the conclusions and recommendations reached for the original design can be applied to the new designs for all loading conditions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of Mach number on performance of an axial-flow compressor rotor-blade row

Effect of Mach number on performance of an axial-flow compressor rotor-blade row

Date: September 28, 1948
Creator: Dugan, Paul D; Mahoney, John J & Benser, William A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ditching Tests of Two Models of the Army B-36 Airplane

Ditching Tests of Two Models of the Army B-36 Airplane

Date: March 1, 1948
Creator: Fisher, Lloyd J. & Cederborg, Gibson, A.
Description: The ditching characteristics of the Army B-36 airplane were determined by testing 1/20- and 1/30-scale dynamic models in calm water in Langley tank no. 2 and at the outdoor catapult. The scope of the tests consisted of ditching the models at various conditions of simulated damage, landing attitudes, and speeds, with various flap settings using several degrees of restraint of the flap hinges. The ditching behavior was evaluated from recordings of deceleration, length of run, and motions of the models. The results showed that the airplane should be ditched at an attitude of about 9 deg with flaps full down. The probable ditching behavior will be a smooth run with a maximum longitudinal deceleration of 3g to 4g and a landing run of 4 to 5 fuselage lengths. Structural failure of the underside of the fuselage will not seriously affect the behavior of the airplane.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of full-scale propellers having Clark Y blade sections

Aerodynamic characteristics at high speeds of full-scale propellers having Clark Y blade sections

Date: October 26, 1948
Creator: Johnson, Peter J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An investigation at low speed of a large-scale triangular wing of aspect ratio two I : characteristics of a wing having a double-wedge airfoil section with maximum thickness at 20-percent chord

An investigation at low speed of a large-scale triangular wing of aspect ratio two I : characteristics of a wing having a double-wedge airfoil section with maximum thickness at 20-percent chord

Date: November 13, 1947
Creator: Anderson, Adrien, E
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Results of an Investigation by the Wing-Flow Method of the Longitudinal Stability Characteristics of a 1/50-Scale Semispan Model of the McDonnell XP-88 Airplane

Preliminary Results of an Investigation by the Wing-Flow Method of the Longitudinal Stability Characteristics of a 1/50-Scale Semispan Model of the McDonnell XP-88 Airplane

Date: June 9, 1948
Creator: Crane, Harold L.
Description: This paper presents the results of measurements of longitudinal stability of a 1/50-scale model of the XP-88 airplane by the wing-flow method. Lift, rolling-moment, hinge-moment, and pitching-moment characteristics as well as the downwash at the tail were measured over a Mach number range from approximately 0.5 to 1.05 at Reynolds numbers below 1,000,000. No measurements of drag were obtained. No abrupt changes due to Mach number were noted in any of the parameters measured. The data indicated that the wing was subject to early tip stalling; that the tail effectiveness decreased gradually with increasing Mach number up to M = 0.9, but increased again at higher Mach numbers; that the variation of downwash with angle of attack did not change appreciably with Mach number except between 0.95 and 1.0 where d(epsilon)/d(alpha), decreased from 0.46 to 0.32; that at zero lift with a stabilizer setting of -1.5 deg there was a gradually increasing nosing-up tendency with increasing Mach number; and that the control-fixed stability in maneuvers at constant speed gradually increased with increasing Mach number.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Ditching Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Lockheed XR60-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 235

Ditching Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Lockheed XR60-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 235

Date: January 1, 1948
Creator: Fisher, Lloyd J. & Cederborg, Gibson A.
Description: The ditching characteristics of the Lockheed XR60-1 airplane were determined by tests of a 1/24-scale dynamic model in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, flap settings, speeds, and conditions of damager were investigated. The ditching behavior was evaluated from recordings of decelerations, length of runs, and motions of the model. Scale-strength bottoms and simulated crumpled bottoms were used to reproduce probable damage to the fuselage. It was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at a landing attitude of about 5 deg with flaps full down. At this attitude, the maximum longitudinal deceleration should not exceed 2g and the landing run will be bout three fuselage lengths. Damage to the fuselage will not be excessive and will be greatest near the point of initial contact with the water.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Report on Investigation of Developed Turbulence

Report on Investigation of Developed Turbulence

Date: January 18, 1949
Creator: Prandtl, L.
Description: The recent experiments by Jakob and Erk, on the resistance of flowing water in smooth pipes, which are in good agreement with earlier measurements by Stenton and Pannell, have caused me to change my opinion that the empirical Blasius law (resistance proportional to the 7/4 power of the mean velocity) was applicable up to arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers. According to the new tests the exponent approaches 2 with increasing Reynolds number, where it remains an open question whether or not a specific finite limiting value of the resistance factor lambda is obtained at R = infinity. With the collapse of Blasius' law the requirements which produced the relation that the velocity in the proximity of the wall varied in proportion to the 7th root of the wall distance must also become void. However, it is found that the fundamental assumption that led to this relationship can be generalized so as to furnish a velocity distribution for any empirical resistance law. These fundamental assumptions can be so expressed that for the law of velocity distribution in proximity of the wall as well as for that of friction at the wall, a form can be found in which the pipe diameter no ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department