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 Serial/Series Title: NACA Advanced Confidential Report
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Shielded Horn Balances and Tabs on a 0.7-Scale Model of XF6F Vertical Tail Surface

Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Shielded Horn Balances and Tabs on a 0.7-Scale Model of XF6F Vertical Tail Surface

Date: March 1, 1944
Creator: Lowry, John G.; Maloney, James A. & Garner, I Elizabeth
Description: Results of subject tests indicate the difficulty of obtaining closely balanced rudder surfaces for most tail assemblies with shielded horns and maintaining a near zero rate-of-change of hinge-moment coefficient without an additional balancing device. A comparison is made between shielded and unshielded horn test results. Pressure distribution and tuft tests of flow over different shaped horns showed higher critical speed for medium-taper nosed horn. The trim tab nose shape had little effect on tab test results.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Investigation of the Effect of Compressibility on the Maximum Lift Coefficient, Special Report

Preliminary Investigation of the Effect of Compressibility on the Maximum Lift Coefficient, Special Report

Date: February 1, 1943
Creator: Stack, John; Fedziuk, Henry A. & Cleary, Harold E.
Description: Preliminary data are presented on the variation of the maximum lift coefficient with Mach number. The data were obtained from tests in the 8-foot high-speed tunnel of three NACA 16-series airfoils of 1-foot chord. Measurements consisted primarily of pressure-distribution measurements in order to illustrate the nature of the phenomena. It was found that the maximum lift coefficient of airfoils is markedly affected by compressibility even at Mach numbers as low as 0.2. At high Mach numbers pronounced decrease of the maximum lift coefficient was found. The magnitude of the effects of compressibility on the maximum lift coefficient and the low speeds at which these effects first appear indicate clearly that consideration of the take-off thrust for propellers will give results seriously in error if these considerations are based on the usual low-speed maximum-lift-coefficient data generally used.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary Wind-Tunnel Tests of the Effect of Nacelles on the Characteristics of a Twin-Engine Bomber Model with Low-Drag Wing, Special Report

Preliminary Wind-Tunnel Tests of the Effect of Nacelles on the Characteristics of a Twin-Engine Bomber Model with Low-Drag Wing, Special Report

Date: July 1, 1942
Creator: Wenzinger, Carl J. & Sivells, James C.
Description: Tests were made in the NACA 19-foot pressure tunnel of a simplified twin-engine bomber model with an NACA low-drag wing primarily to obtain an indication of the effects of engine nacelles on the characteristics of the model both with and without simple split trailing-edge flaps. Nacelles with conventional-type cowlings representative of those used on an existing high-performance airplane and with NACA high-speed type E cowlings were tested. The tests were made without propeller slipstream. The aerodynamic effects of adding the nacelles to the low-drag wing were similar to the effects commonly obtained by adding similar nacelles to conventional wings. The maximum lift coefficient without flaps was slightly increased, but the increment in maximum lift due to deflecting the flaps was somewhat decreased. The stalling characteristics were improved by the presence of the nacelles. Addition of the nacelles had a destabilizing effect on the pitching moments, as is usual for nacelles that project forward of the wing. The drag increments due to the nacelles were of the usual order of magnitude, with the increment due to the nacelles with NACA type E cowlings approximately one-third less than that of the nacelles with conventional cowlings with built-in air scoops.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The development and application of high-critical-speed nose inlets

The development and application of high-critical-speed nose inlets

Date: July 1, 1945
Creator: Wright, John B
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An analysis of jet-propulsion systems making direct use of the working substance of a thermodynamic cycle

An analysis of jet-propulsion systems making direct use of the working substance of a thermodynamic cycle

Date: February 1, 1945
Creator: Rubert, Kennedy F
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Addition of heat to a compressible fluid in motion

Addition of heat to a compressible fluid in motion

Date: February 1, 1945
Creator: Hicks, Bruce L
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Comparison of calculated and experimental propeller characteristics for four-, six-, and eight-blade single-rotating propellers

Comparison of calculated and experimental propeller characteristics for four-, six-, and eight-blade single-rotating propellers

Date: February 1, 1944
Creator: Crigler, John L
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Comparison of fixed-stabilizer, adjustable- stabilizer and all-movable horizontal tails

Comparison of fixed-stabilizer, adjustable- stabilizer and all-movable horizontal tails

Date: October 1, 1945
Creator: Harmon, Sidney M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

Date: August 1, 1941
Creator: Stack, John
Description: Compressible-flow research, while a relatively new field in aeronautics, is very old, dating back almost to the development of the first firearm. Over the last hundred years, researches have been conducted in the ballistics field, but these results have been of practically no use in aeronautical engineering because the phenomena that have been studied have been the more or less steady supersonic condition of flow. Some work that has been done in connection with steam turbines, particularly nozzle studies, has been of value, In general, however, understanding of compressible-flow phenomena has been very incomplete and permitted no real basis for the solution of aeronautical engineering problems in which.the flow is likely to be unsteady because regions of both subsonic and supersonic speeds may occur. In the early phases of the development of the airplane, speeds were so low that the effects of compressibility could be justifiably ignored. During the last war and immediately after, however, propellers exhibited losses in efficiency as the tip speeds approached the speed of sound, and the first experiments of an aeronautical nature were therefore conducted with propellers. Results of these experiments indicated serious losses of efficiency, but aeronautical engineers were not seriously concerned at the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Completed Tabulation in the United States of Tests of 24 Airfoils at High Mach Numbers (Derived from Interrupted Work at Guidonia, Italy in the 1.31- by 1.74-Foot High-Speed Tunnel)

Completed Tabulation in the United States of Tests of 24 Airfoils at High Mach Numbers (Derived from Interrupted Work at Guidonia, Italy in the 1.31- by 1.74-Foot High-Speed Tunnel)

Date: June 1, 1945
Creator: Ferri, Antonio
Description: Two-dimensional data were obtained in Mach range of from 0.40 to 0.94 and Reynolds Number range of (3.4 - 4.2) X 10 Degrees. Results indicate that thickness ratio is dominating shape parameter at high Mach numbers and that aerodynamic advantages are attainable by using thinnest possible sections. Effects of jet boundaries, Reynolds Number, and Data presented are free from jet-boundary and humidity effects.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department