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  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils VI : continuation of reports nos. 93, 124, 182, 244, and 286

Aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils VI : continuation of reports nos. 93, 124, 182, 244, and 286

Date: 1930~
Creator: unknown
Description: This collection of data on airfoils has been made from the published reports of a number of the leading aerodynamic laboratories of this country and Europe. The information which was originally expressed according to the different customs of the several laboratories is here presented in a uniform series of charts and tables suitable for use of designing engineers and for purposes of general reference. The authority for the results here presented is given as the name of the laboratory at which the experiments were conducted, with the size of the model, wind velocity, and year of test.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic characteristics of twenty-four airfoils at high speeds

Aerodynamic characteristics of twenty-four airfoils at high speeds

Date: 1930~
Creator: Brigg, L. J. & Dryden, H. L.
Description: The aerodynamic characteristics of 24 airfoils are given for speeds of 0.5, 0.65, 0.8, 0.95, and 1.08 times the speed of sound, as measured in an open-jet air stream 2 inches in diameter, using models of 1-inch chord. The 24 airfoils belong to four general groups. The first is the standard R. A. F. family in general use by the Army and Navy for propeller design, the members of the family differing only in thickness. This family is represented by nine members ranging in thickness from 0.04 to 0.20 inch. The second group consists of five members of the Clark Y family, the members of the family again differing only in thickness. The third group, comprising six members, is a second R. A. F. Family in which the position of the maximum ordinate is varied. Combined with two members of the first R.A.F. family, this group represents a variation of maximum ordinate position from 30 to 60 percent of the chord in two camber ratios, 0.08 and 0.16. The fourth group consists of three geometrical forms, a flat plate, a wedge, and a segment of a right circular cylinder. In addition one section used in the reed metal propeller was ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agglomeration and Leaching of Slimes and Other Finely Divided Ores

Agglomeration and Leaching of Slimes and Other Finely Divided Ores

Date: 1930
Creator: Sullivan, John D. & Towne, Alfred P.
Description: Report discussing the loads and extracting of slime and other divided ores. The report discusses experimental work done on the materials.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (15th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 309 to 336

Annual report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (15th).administrative report including Technical Reports nos. 309 to 336

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: unknown
Description: Report includes the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics letter of submittal to the President, Congressional report, summaries of the committee's activities and research accomplished, bibliographies, and financial report.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Chakachamna-Stony Region, Alaska

The Chakachamna-Stony Region, Alaska

Date: 1930
Creator: Capps, Stephen R.
Description: A report on the exploration and survey of the Chakachamna-Stony Region of Alaska.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Coal-Mine Fatalities in the United States, 1928

Coal-Mine Fatalities in the United States, 1928

Date: 1930
Creator: Adams, William W.
Description: Report compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Mines including statistics on fatalities in coal mines located in the United States as well as data regarding the various operations (e.g., number of miners employed and average production). The information is organized into tables for comparison and the text draws some overall conclusions in the summary.
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Coefficients of flow of standard nozzles

Coefficients of flow of standard nozzles

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Mueller, H & Peters, H
Description: We first undertook experiments with air, devoted principally to the investigation of the disturbances due to the differences in the nature of the flow to the nozzle. The difficulty of measuring the air, however, caused us to experiment with water. Due to the possibility of measuring the capacity of the container, this method was much more accurate than measuring with Pitot tobes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Collection of wind-tunnel data on commonly used wing sections

Collection of wind-tunnel data on commonly used wing sections

Date: January 1930
Creator: Louden, F. A.
Description: This report groups in a uniform manner the aerodynamic properties of commonly used wing sections as determined from tests in various wind tunnels. The data have been collected from reports of a number of laboratories. Where necessary, transformation has been made to the absolute system of coefficients and tunnel wall interference corrections have been applied. Tables and graphs present the data in the various forms useful to the engineer in the selection of a wing section.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Combating airplane fires

Combating airplane fires

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Brunat, Henri
Description: This report provides a summary of the important steps to be taken in combating airplane fires.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Commercial Possibilities of the Texas-New Mexico Potash Deposits

Commercial Possibilities of the Texas-New Mexico Potash Deposits

Date: 1930
Creator: Wroth, James S.
Description: From Introduction Results of Test: "Among the domestic potash resources which were brought to the attention of the country during and after the war but were not utilized as a source of potash, although they indicated that they might furnish the cheap potash desired, were the potash deposits occurring with the think rock-salt formations of western Texas and southeastern New Mexico."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Construction and Operation of the Bureau of Mines Experimental Oil-Shale Plant, 1925-1927

Construction and Operation of the Bureau of Mines Experimental Oil-Shale Plant, 1925-1927

Date: 1930
Creator: Gavin, Martin J. & Desmond, John S.
Description: Report describing the construction of the Bureau of Mines experimental oil-shale plant at Rulison, CO, during 1925 and 1926, its operation, and the results obtained from refinery studies of the oil produced.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Contribution to the study of normal burning in gaseous carbureted mixtures. Part I

Contribution to the study of normal burning in gaseous carbureted mixtures. Part I

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Duchene, M R
Description: In the present study it is proposed to provide an equipment permitting the study of the propagation of the region of reaction in mixtures of air and carbureted gases enclosed within a cylinder. Ignition is produced at the end of compression by an electric spark. With this apparatus it is proposed to determine: 1) the influence of the richness of the explosive mixture on the rate of flame propagation; 2) the influence of the degree of volumetric compression on one of the hydrocarbons; 3) the influence of the variation of initial temperature of the mixture before compression; 4) the influence of tetraethyl-lead on the propagation - notably on the formation of the explosive wave.
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Contribution to the study of normal burning in gaseous carbureted mixtures.  Part II

Contribution to the study of normal burning in gaseous carbureted mixtures. Part II

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Duchene, M R
Description: Results of the investigations described in the previous report are presented and conclusions are drawn.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Drag and cooling with various forms of cowling for a "whirlwind" radial air-cooled engine  I

Drag and cooling with various forms of cowling for a "whirlwind" radial air-cooled engine I

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Weick, Fred E
Description: This report presents the results of an investigation undertaken in the 20-foot Propeller Research Tunnel at Langley Field on the cowling of radial air-cooled engines. A portion of the investigation has been completed, in which several forms and degrees of cowling were tested on Wright "Whirlwind" J-5 engine mounted in the nose of a cabin fuselage. The cowlings varied from the one extreme of an entirely exposed engine to the other in which the engine was entirely inclosed. Cooling tests were made and each cowling modified, if necessary, until the engine cooled approximately as satisfactorily as when it was entirely exposed. Drag tests were then made with each form of cowling, and the effect of the cowling on the propulsive efficiency determined with a metal propeller. The propulsive efficiency was found to be practically the same with all forms of cowling. The drag of the cabin fuselage with uncowled engine was found to be more than three times as great as the drag of the fuselage with engine removed and nose rounded. The conventional forms of cowling, in which at least the tops of the cylinder heads and valve gear are exposed, reduce the drag somewhat, but the cowling entirely ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Drag and cooling with various forms of cowling for a "Whirlwind" radial air-cooled engine  II

Drag and cooling with various forms of cowling for a "Whirlwind" radial air-cooled engine II

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Weick, Fred E
Description: This report gives the results of the second portion of an investigation in the twenty-foot Propeller Research Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, on the cowling and cooling of a "Whirlwind" J-5 radial air-cooled engine. The first portion pertains to tests with a cabin fuselage. This report covers tests with several forms of cowling, including conventional types, individual fairings behind the cylinders, individual hoods over the over the cylinders, and the new N. A. C. A. complete cowling, all on an open cockpit fuselage. Drag tests were also made with a conventional engine nacelle, and with a nacelle having the new complete cowling. In the second part of the investigation the results found in the first part were substantiated. It was also found that the reduction in drag with the complete cowling over that with conventional cowling is greater with the smaller bodies than with the cabin fuselage; in fact, the gain in the case of the completely cowled nacelle is over twice that with the cabin fuselage. The individual fairings and hoods did not prove effective in reducing the drag. The results of flight tests on AT-5A airplane has been analyzed and found to agree very well ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The effect of cowling on cylinder temperatures and performance of a Wright J-5 engine

The effect of cowling on cylinder temperatures and performance of a Wright J-5 engine

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Schey, Oscar W & Biermann, Arnold E
Description: This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine the effect of different amounts and kinds of cowling on the performance and cylinder temperatures of a standard Wright J-5 engine. These tests were conducted in conjunction with drag and propeller tests in which the same cowlings were used. Four different cowlings were investigated varying from the one extreme of no cowling on the engine to the other extreme of the engine completely cowled and the cooling air flowing inside the cowling through an opening in the nose and out through an annular opening at the rear of the engine. Each cowling was tested at air speeds of approximately 60, 80, and 100 miles per hour.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The effect of supercharger capacity on engine and airplane performance

The effect of supercharger capacity on engine and airplane performance

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Schey, O W & Gove, W D
Description: This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the effect of different supercharger capacities on the performance of an airplane and its engine . The tests were conducted on a DH4-M2 airplane powered with a Liberty 12 engine. In this investigation four supercharger capacities, obtained by driving a roots type supercharger at 1.615, 1.957, 2.4, and 3 time engine speed, were used to maintain sea-level pressure at the carburetor to altitudes of 7,000, 11,500, 17,000, and 22,000 feet, respectively. The performance of the airplane in climb and in level flight was determined for each of the four supercharger drive ratios and for the unsupercharged condition. The engine power was measured during these tests by means of a calibrated propeller. It was found that very little sacrifice in sea-level performance was experienced with the larger supercharger drive ratios as compared with performance obtained when using the smaller drive ratios. The results indicate that further increase in supercharger capacity over that obtained when using 3:1 drive ratio would give a slight increase in ceiling and in high-altitude performance but would considerably impair the performance for an appreciable distance below the critical altitude. As the supercharger capacity was increased, the height ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Effect of Vacuum on Oil Wells

Effect of Vacuum on Oil Wells

Date: 1930
Creator: Lindsly, Ben E. & Berwald, W. B.
Description: From Introduction: "Because of the above reasons, because there is a dearth of published information relating to the effect of vacuum oil wells, and because misapplication of vacuum may result in a greatly decreased ultimate recovery of oil, whereas the correct application may have the opposite effect, the Bureau of Mines has authorized this investigation."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experimental and analytical determination of the motion of hydraulically operated valve stems in oil engine injection systems

Experimental and analytical determination of the motion of hydraulically operated valve stems in oil engine injection systems

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Gelalles, A G & Rothrock, A M
Description: This research on the pressure variations in the injection system of the N.A.C.A. Spray Photography Equipment and on the effects of these variations on the motion of the timing valve stem was undertaken in connection with the study of fuel injection systems for high-speed oil engines. The methods of analysis of the pressure variations and the general equation for the motion of the spring-loaded stem for the timing valve are applicable to a spring-loaded automatic injection valve, and in general to all hydraulically operated valves. A sample calculation for a spring-loaded automatic injection valve is included.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Flight tests on U.S.S. Los Angeles. Part I : full scale pressure distribution investigation

Flight tests on U.S.S. Los Angeles. Part I : full scale pressure distribution investigation

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: De France, S J
Description: The primary purpose of this investigation was to obtain simultaneous data on the loads and stress experience in flight by the U. S. S. Los Angeles which could be used in rigid airship structure design. A secondary object of the investigation was to determine the turning and drag characteristics of the airship. The aerodynamic loading was obtained by measuring the pressure at 95 locations on the tail surfaces, 54 on the hull, and 5 on the passenger car. These measurements were made during a series of maneuvers consisting of turns and reversals in smooth air and during a cruise in rough air which was just short of squall proportions. The results of the pressure measurements on the hull indicate that the forces on the forebody of an airship are relatively small. The tail surface measurements show conclusively that the forces caused by gusts are much greater than those caused by horizontal maneuvers. In this investigation the tail surface loadings caused by gusts closely approached the designed loads of the tail structure. The turning and drag characteristics will be reported in separate reports.
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Flight tests on U.S.S. Los Angeles. Part II : stress and strength determination

Flight tests on U.S.S. Los Angeles. Part II : stress and strength determination

Date: January 1930
Creator: Burgess, C. P.
Description: The tests described in this report furnished data on the actual aerodynamic forces, and the resulting stresses and bending moments in the hull of the U. S. S. "Los Angeles" during as severe still-air maneuvers as the airship would normally be subjected to, and in straight flight during as rough air as is likely to occur in service, short of squall or storm conditions. The maximum stresses were found to be within the limits provided for in accepted practice in airship design. Normal flight in rough air was shown to produce forces and stresses about twice as great as the most severe still-air maneuvers. No light was thrown upon the forces which might occur in extreme or exceptional conditions, such as the storm which destroyed the "Shenandoah". The transverse aerodynamic forces on the hull proper were found to be small and irregular. Owing to the necessity of conserving helium, it was impossible to fly the airship in a condition of large excess of buoyancy or weight in order to determine the air pressure distribution at a fixed angle of pitch. However, there is every reason to believe that in that condition the forces on the actual airship are as close ...
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Flow and Force Equations for a Body Revolving in a Fluid

Flow and Force Equations for a Body Revolving in a Fluid

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Zahm, A F
Description: Part I gives a general method for finding the steady-flow velocity relative to a body in plane curvilinear motion, whence the pressure is found by Bernoulli's energy principle. Integration of the pressure supplies basic formulas for the zonal forces and moments on the revolving body. Part II, applying this steady-flow method, finds the velocity and pressure at all points of the flow inside and outside an ellipsoid and some of its limiting forms, and graphs those quantities for the latter forms. Part III finds the pressure, and thence the zonal force and moment, on hulls in plane curvilinear flight. Part IV derives general equations for the resultant fluid forces and moments on trisymmetrical bodies moving through a perfect fluid, and in some cases compares the moment values with those found for bodies moving in air. Part V furnishes ready formulas for potential coefficients and inertia coefficients for an ellipsoid and its limiting forms. Thence are derived tables giving numerical values of those coefficients for a comprehensive range of shapes.
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Fuel vapor pressures and the relation of vapor pressure to the preparation of fuel for combustion in fuel injection engines

Fuel vapor pressures and the relation of vapor pressure to the preparation of fuel for combustion in fuel injection engines

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Joachim, William F & Rothrock, A M
Description: This investigation on the vapor pressure of fuels was conducted in connection with the general research on combustion in fuel injection engines. The purpose of the investigation was to study the effects of high temperatures such as exist during the first stages of injection on the vapor pressures of several fuels and certain fuel mixtures, and the relation of these vapor pressures to the preparation of the fuel for combustion in high-speed fuel injection engines.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Full-scale turning characteristics of the U.S.S. Los Angeles

Full-scale turning characteristics of the U.S.S. Los Angeles

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Thompson, F L
Description: This paper present a description of the method employed and results obtained in full-scale turning trials on the rigid airship U. S. S. "Los Angeles". The results of this investigation are not sufficiently comprehensive to permit definite conclusions as to the variation of turning characteristics with changes in speed and rudder angle. They indicate however, that the turning radius compares favorably with that for other large airships, that the radius is independent of the speed, that the position of the point of zero yaw is nearly independent of the rudder angle and air speed, and that a theoretical relation between radius and angle of yaw in a turn gives a close approximation to actuality.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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