You limited your search to:

  Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Serial/Series Title: NACA Technical Notes
 Collection: Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Rate of heat transfer from finned metal surfaces

Rate of heat transfer from finned metal surfaces

Date: January 1, 1930
Creator: Taylor, G Fayette & Rehbock, A
Description: The object was to evaluate the factors which control the rate of heat transfer to a moving current of air from finned metal surfaces similar to those used on aircraft engine cylinders. The object was to establish data which will enable the finning of cooling surfaces to be designed to suit the particular needs of any specific application. Most of the work was done on flat copper specimens 6 inches square, upon which were mounted copper fins with spacings varying from 1/2 inch to 1/12 inch. All fins were 1 inch deep, 6 inches long, and .020 inch thick. The results of the investigation are given in the form of curves included here. In general, it was found that for specimens of this kind, the effectiveness of a given fin does not decrease very rapidly until its distance from adjacent fins has been reduced to 1/9 or 1/10 of an inch. A formula for the heat transfer from a flat surface without fins was developed, and an approximate formula for the finned specimens is suggested.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Comparative performance obtained with XF7C-1 airplane using several different engine cowlings

Comparative performance obtained with XF7C-1 airplane using several different engine cowlings

Date: February 1, 1930
Creator: Schey, Oscar W; Johnson, Ernest & Gough, Melvin N
Description: Discussed here are problems with the use of cowlings with radial air cooled engines. An XF7C-1 airplane, equipped with service cowling and with narrow ring, wide ring, and exhaust collector ring cowlings over the service cowling, was used. For these four cowling conditions, the rate of climb and high speed performance were determined, the cylinder conditions were measured, and pictures to show visibility were taken. The level flight performance obtained with an engine speed of 1900 r.p.m. for the service type, the narrow ring, the wide ring, and the exhaust collector ring was 144.4, 146.6, 152.8, and 155 mph, respectively. The rate of climb was practically the same for each type tested. The visibility was not materially impaired by the use of the wide or the narrow cowlings. With the narrow ring and exhaust collector ring cowlings there was an increase in cylinder temperature. However, this increase was not enough to affect the performance of the engine. The use of an exhaust collector ring incorporated into the cowling is practical where the problem of visibility does not enter.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Injection labs in a common-rail fuel injection system

Injection labs in a common-rail fuel injection system

Date: February 1, 1930
Creator: Rothrock, A M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Test of an adjustable pitch model propeller at four blade settings

Test of an adjustable pitch model propeller at four blade settings

Date: February 1, 1930
Creator: Lesley, E P
Description: This note describes tests of an adjustable blade metal model propeller, both in a free wind stream and in combination with a model fuselage, at four settings of the blades. The model propeller is designed for a uniform nominal pitch/diameter ratio of .7 and the blade settings used correspond to nominal pitch/diameter ratios of .5, .7, .9, and 1.1 at the .6 radius. The tests show that propellers of this type may be considerably changed in setting from the designed pitch angles and yet give excellent performance. The efficiency realized and power absorbed when blades are set at other than the designed angle, are little different than would be obtained from a propeller with uniform pitch equal to the mean pitch of the propeller under test.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The effect of wing tip floating ailerons on the autorotation of a monoplane wing model

The effect of wing tip floating ailerons on the autorotation of a monoplane wing model

Date: March 1, 1930
Creator: Knight, Montgomery & Wenzinger, Carl J
Description: The preliminary tests described here were made to determine the extent to which wing tip floating ailerons might be effective in reducing airplane spinning tendencies. The tests showed that initial spinning tendencies and rates of stable spinning could doubtless be reduced by the use of tip floating ailerons on an airplane. It also appears to be desirable to reduce to a minimum the interference between wing and aileron. This would serve to maintain uniformity of action at all angles of attack and enable calculation of the aileron characteristics.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The structure and properties of parachute cloths

The structure and properties of parachute cloths

Date: March 1, 1930
Creator: Mcnicholas, H J & Hedrick, F
Description: The requisite properties of a parachute cloth are discussed and the methods for measuring these properties described. In addition to the structural analysis of the cloths, the properties measured were weight, breaking strength, tear resistance, elasticity, and air permeability. Thirty-six silk cloths of domestic manufacture, not previously used in parachute construction are compared with some silk cloths of foreign manufacture. These foreign cloths were ones proven by trial and extended use to be suitable materials for parachute construction. Contrary to the belief that domestic woven cloths were not suitable materials for parachute construction, it is shown that many domestic silk cloths are satisfactory and in some respects superior to the foreign products. Based on a comparative study of all the cloths, specifications are drawn for the manufacture of silk parachute cloth.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Pressure distribution on the tail surfaces of a PW-9 pursuit airplane in flight

Pressure distribution on the tail surfaces of a PW-9 pursuit airplane in flight

Date: April 1, 1930
Creator: Rhode, Richard V
Description: Presented here are pressure distribution data obtained from the tail surfaces of a PW-9 in a number of flight maneuvers. The results given are part of those obtained in an extensive investigation of the pressure distribution over all of the lifting and control surfaces of this airplane. The results are given in tabular and curve form and are discussed briefly with respect to their comparison with existing tail surface design specifications. It is recommended that tail load design loadings should be revised upwards. This is particularly true of leading edge loads, which should be at least doubled for thick sections.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Full scale drag tests on various parts of Fairchild (FC-2W2) cabin monoplane

Full scale drag tests on various parts of Fairchild (FC-2W2) cabin monoplane

Date: May 1, 1930
Creator: Hernstein, William H , Jr
Description: The drag due to the various parts of a Fairchild (FC-2W2) cabin monoplane was measured at air speeds varying from 50 to 100 m.p.h., in the Twenty-Foot Propeller Research Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. It was found that the largest drag was due to the radial air-cooled engine. The measured drag due to the landing gear was also large, being about 4/5 of that due to the engine. Substituting Musselman type wheels for the standard wheels caused no change in the drag due to the landing gear. A small decrease in drag was effected by adding a turtle back to the airplane fuselage.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Refrigerated wind tunnel tests on surface coatings for preventing ice formation

Refrigerated wind tunnel tests on surface coatings for preventing ice formation

Date: May 1, 1930
Creator: Knight, Montgomery & Clay, William C
Description: This investigation was conducted to determine the effectiveness of various surface coatings as a means for preventing ice formations on aircraft in flight. The substances used as coatings for these tests are divided into two groups: compounds soluble in water, and those which are insoluble in water. It was found that certain soluble compounds were apparently effective in preventing the formation of ice on an airfoil model, while all insoluble compounds which were tested were found to be ineffective.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Some effects of air and fuel oil temperatures on spray penetration and dispersion

Some effects of air and fuel oil temperatures on spray penetration and dispersion

Date: May 1, 1930
Creator: Gelalles, A G
Description: Presented here are experimental results obtained from a brief investigation of the appearance, penetration, and dispersion of oil sprays injected into a chamber of highly heated air at atmospheric pressure. The development of single sprays injected into a chamber containing air at room temperature and at high temperature was recorded by spray photography equipment. A comparison of spray records showed that with the air at the higher temperature, the spray assumed the appearance of thin, transparent cloud, the greatest part of which rapidly disappeared from view. With the chamber air at room temperature, a compact spray with an opaque core was obtained. Measurements of the records showed a decrease in penetration and an increase in the dispersion of the spray injected into the heated air. No ignition of the fuel injected was observed or recorded until the spray particles came in contact with the much hotter walls of the chamber about 0.3 second after the start of injection.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT LAST